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9 > Image 9 of Kentucky Alumnus, vol. 7, no. 1, August 1915

Part of Kentucky alumnus

THE KENTUCKY ALUMNUS. 7 affairs, help the. University or support the Association. I have neither time, money nor inclination for such purpose." Did you ever hear anybody talk like that? Not even yourselfyes- terday, or some time? If not, you are more lucky than some of us. Suffice it to be said, a goodly number of alumni do not appreciate what Ken- tucky State has done for them, that the State has bestowed upon them a free gift in the form of an education-an investment of at least $1000 y in each of them, and that they have not given anything in return, nor * do they even possess a loyal disposition toward herin fact, their position , relative to the University is negative. If these anti-sentimentalists- ' these recipients of the States favors-have never tried keeping in touch i with the University; have never "reuned" with the old classmates; have i never attended a meeting of the Association; have never felt a throb of ` loyalty to the old College that has done so much for them, there is hope yet, for there must be hidden away somewhere in the innermost recesses a little feeling of appreciation, loyalty, a sense of dutya service they owe their Alma Mater and State. . * == =i= * * Those who were fortunate enough to be able to attend the The Alumni annual business meeting of the Association June 9 will Trustees testify to the genuineness and the sincerity of the hundred or more loyal members who were present to bring to the service of the Association and College the very best that their sober judg- ment possessed. It was a meeting marked by good spirit and unity of action and purpose. It would have been a happy occasion indeed if every 4 alumnus could have been present to hear the Alumni members of the Board of Trustees make their report and speak upon the subject of the University and the.Association, expressing themselves forcefully that it was their desire and duty to render the University the very best service possible, and they stated that in order to do it, it was necessary that they have the undivided support and co-operation of the Alumni. These gentlemen left no doubt in the minds of those who heard them that they fully appreciated the responsibilities imposed upon them by their offices, that they would take up their duties eourageously and discharge them without fear or favor. In these gentlemen the Associa- tion has a strong representation on the Boardmen with a broad vision, judgment and grasp, and men with good hearts as well as good heads. The alumni are fortunate to be represented on the Board by such a type of men, and men who are so deeply interested in the development and welfare of the University. * = * * * There seem to be a good many reasons why the Kentucky State Net alumni of state universities apparently feel less re-` An Exception sponsibility and less adection for their alma maters than the alumni of privately endowed universities, but the most potent cause of lack of loyalty seems to be that of free educa-