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Image 10 of Kentucky alumnus, 1920

Part of Kentucky alumnus

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i 3 ». lt i I i ii i 2 2 Er r I Y = I 8 THE KmN1·UcKY ALUMNUs. _ A * 2 ‘ · Value of State University plants.——Covering the value of grounds, build. ’ » I j ings, library, apparatus, machinery and furnit1u·e in 1916-17. (Based 5 1 it on the Federal Education Bureau Bulletin No. 55, 1917.) _ . I ‘ 1. California ............ $13,584,432 23. Delaware State Col..$1,423,129 lv ‘ T7 i 2. Minnesota ............ 10,681,075 24. Georgia ................ 1,375,000 Z 1 3. New York, Cornell 9,534,854 25. West Virginia ...... 1,281,085 . » C 4. Wisconsin .............. 8,128,346 26. North Carolina ...... 1,222,675 5. Michigan .............. 7,546,821 27. Kentucky ............ 1,185,542 · 6. Illinois .................. 6,556,659 28. Oregon ................. 1,043,702 E ~ §§ § , 7. Ohio State ............ 6,296,368 29. Louisiana ............ 970,574 { »· 1 8. Iowa ...................... 4,141,408 30. Idaho .................... 965,606 _ gg I‘ 9. Missouri ................ 3,982,525 31. Maine .................. 948,337 , _ 5*3 10. Nebraska .............. 3,153,174 32. Nevada ................ 918,220 j 11. Penn.State College 2,802,713 33. North Dakota ....... 904,997 , Z`? 12. Washington .......... 2,740,209 34. Oklahoma ............ 884,713 _ v_; n .. 13. Texas .................... 2,555,191 35. Wyoming ............ 865,000 _Q _ " 14. Virginia ........... . .... 2,297,059 36. Utah ..................... 757,812 ;_ `§ _~ 15. Kansas .............. 1,2,000,000 37. South Dakota ........ 750,000 5, ; 16. Indiana ................ 1,681,600 38. Arkansas ............. 718,000 ‘ . 1 17. New Jersey,Rutgers 1,660,979 39. Arizona ................ 708,500 Q_ ' -. 18. Colorado .............. 1,515,000 40. Florida ................ 698,000 19. Vermont ............... 1,511,222 41. Mississippi ........... 536,000 ’ i` 20. Tennessee ............ 1,458,993 42. R. I. State College 485,335 g 21. Alabama .............. 1,439,318 43. Montana .............. ’ 430,252 9 — 22. South Carolina ...... 1,425,004 44. New Mexico ......... 250,426 ’ Another table shows the investments made in University plants. · It will be observed that only three southern states have a smaller 1 A ’ f . investment than Kentucky. These are Louisiana, Mississippi and Arkansas. e { Our neighbors on the north have in Illinois an investment of $6,556,659; - . e ~ 3 Indiana with Purdue University, where Engineering and Agriculture are . - . E taught, an investment of $4,000,000; Ohio, $6,296,368. These iigures are `j ` i;_ now outgrown, and should be increased by many hundreds of thousands, ` , 1 Q, f while Kentucky’s investmenbhas been almost stationary for several years. i { (b) Requirements for Agriculture and Engineering ‘ ` l _;_ The great need of the University is additional funds because of it · i Q changed conditions. These funds are required for the payment of better ‘ _ ff' ; salaries and the increase of departments, particularly in agriculture and ° __ It engineering. The situation in the College of Agriculture has reached { [ such a point that it can hardly be expected that the teachers in that col- 7 - lege can be maintained largely from federal funds. The Experiment Station ._ ` JY also should have additional land. The farm of 240 acres is insufficient t V _ ?;- for the requirements of the University. While some progress has been A · {Y made in the purchase of livestock, still it is essential that the animals fof — — instructional purposes should be largely increased. _ . For twenty—five years now the College of Engineering has been . Q»_ getting on with inadequate equipment. Many of the buildings are HH- _ _ satisfactory, and much of the equipment is obsolete. The college has ,, ‘ had the reputation of turning out capable young men. In fact, every mall ;