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Image 6 of The Cats' Pause, 17-Dec-77

Part of The Cats' Pause

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PAGE 6 THE CATS' PAUSE, DECEMBER 10, 1977 St. John's Coach Has Illustrious Background In The Cage World One of the most respected basketball minds in the nation is Lou Carnesecca, coach at St. John's. Having spent nearly 25 years involved with Eastern basketball in some way, Carnesecca has seen the evolution of the sport from a vantage point unfamiliar to most Kentuckians. For years, Eastern basketball has been, well, diffeient from the type played in other localities. The emphasis in the East was on passing and moving, not shooting. With the coming of such one-on-one operators as Julius Erving and Earl Monroe, the eastern cities, such as New York and Philadelphia, have given rise to the new breed of. flambouyant performers. Carnesecca's seen it all -- the passing of a Bob Cousy, the slam dunks of Dr. J and Connie Hawkins, the college and the professional game. He's currently in his tenth year as head coach at St. John's, where he first served as an assistant to the legendary Joe Lapchick. Carnesecca also has coached in the pro ranks, guiding the New York Nets for three seasons in the early seventies. Back at his alma mater now, Carnesecca has assembled a good, young team, which will be playing in this year's UKIT. Recetnly, Carnessca consented to an interview, and he talked about his current team, the state of the game, and basketball in general. Q: We hear a lot about Eastern ball. Is it really that different from other styles of play? Carnesecca: "I would think there's very little difference any more. The tube has served as a great stabilizer for the game. Kids all over the country are exposed to the game via television, and they all learn the same basic game. TV is the great disseminator of Carnesecca ideas." Q: Maybe Eastern ball isn't different, but that game we all saw Holy Cross play in the NCAA against Michigan was far removed from the Nevada Las Vegases of the world. Carnesecca: "Holy Cross ran a clinic. They are a perfect example of the give-and-go. And remember, they almost beat Michigan without their best player, Ronnie Pery. The Princeton team that won the NIT a few years ago (1975) was like that, too. That's just the old give-and-go." Q: You've coached in both the colleges and the pros. Which type of game do you prefer? Carnesecca: "Both are great, great games, but when it comes down to watching the best basketball, you have to go with the pros. When they're well-rested, and not pacing themselves, they play the best brand of basketball." Q: How much difference was there in the way you handled your pro players and the way you handle college kids? Carnesecca: "Fundamentally, you approach the game in the same way. But you have to allow the professional players more room to express themselves. You've got to remember, you're dealing with a different type of individual in the pro ranks. You're dealing with an individual who already has achieved a large measure of fame, and who might be more concerned with next year's contract over the good of the team." Q: You stayed in the pros three years before returning to St. John's. Are you sorry you ever left college ball? Carnesecca: "No, I'm glad I did it. Each man has to find his own niche, and I think mine is at St. John's. I enjoy coaching at St. John's, I can stay with my family, there's not as much traveling involved. But I am glad I coached the Nets." Q: People around here probably remember the Net Teams you coached. In 1972, your team upset the Kentucky Colonels in the ABA playoffs when the Colonels were supposed to waltz through to the title. You had guys like Rick Barry, John Roche, Billy Paultz, and some guy named John Baum who came off the bench and did a good job in one game when Barry was sick. Carnesecca: "You remember that team? That was some bunch of players. We also had Tom Washington and Ollie Taylor, and Bill Melchionni. That was a great thrill to beat a team like the Colonels. We really should have beaten the Pacers in the finals that year." (Continued On Page 27) RUSHING - Top Tv.'ent ' Att Player & School Att Yds Avq 5.4 5.1 5.4 Gair.e Aver. Statistics Alexander, LSU 11 311 1636 Davis, Ala. 11 182 931 Cribbs, Aub. 11 161 872 Finch, Tenn. 11 154 770 5.0 Green, Pla. 10 119 696 5.8 McLee, Ga. 11 17 8 717 4.0 McClendon, Ga. 11 116 705 6.1 D.Johnson, M.St. 9 114 .529 4.6 Nathan, Ala. 11 104 ' 642 6.2 Andrews, Aub. 11 137 635 4.6 LeCount, Fla. 11 130 628 4.8 Storey, Miss. 10 143 564 3.9 Ramsey, Ky. 11 159 618 3.9 Wilder, Fla. 11 87 4S5 5.7 Mordica, Vandy 11 133 449 3.4 Perry, Miss. 11 110 478 4.3 Brooks, Aub. 11 107 467 4.4 Streater, Tenn. 10 136 397 2.9 Williams, Miss. 11 80 433 5.4 Dipre, Ky. 11 116 399 3.4 15JK 3 84.6 79.3 70. 0 69. 6 65.2 64.1 58.8 58. 4 .7 ,1 . 4 .2 , 0 .9 ,5 ,5 .7 .4 ,3 TP 17 57 57 56 56 45 44 43 42 39 39 36 3 7 13 4 3 . 3 2 8 2 3v PASSING - Top Twenty Player s School G Att Cmp Int Pel Yds Gm Cmp TD "Wright, Vandy 11 211 Threadgil.'l,K.St. 11 _219 Ramsey, Ky. 11 156 Ensminger, LSU 11 159 Streater, Inrm. 10 105 Rutledge, Ala. ]1 107 LeCount, Fla. 11 13 4 Crane, Aub. 9 108 Ellis, Miss. 8 82 Garner, Miss. 9 56 106 91 7 4 71 59 64 62 43 35 33 13 6 4 4 5 9 10 7 2 5U2 416 474 447 562 59 8 462 398 429 . 58 9 Pyburn, Ga. 8 55 25 6 .454 Kyan, Tenn. 10 65 27 4 .415 Trotman, Aub. 11 47 23 5 .489 Brantley, Fla. 11 31 14 1 .451 Rogers, Ga. 9 24 11 1 .458 Cook, Ga. 10 41 12 3 .293 Woodley, LSU 11 36 12 2 .333 Deaton, Ky. 9 27 9 1 .333 Shealy, Ala. 11 11 5 0 .455 Brown, M.St. 5 23 5 3 .217 1383 1317 892 952 742 1207 848 67 9. 551 462 312 355 389 161 115 124 212 161 57 78 9.6 '8. 3 6.7 6.5 5.9 5.8 5.6 4.8 3.7 2.1 1.3 1.2 1.2 1.1 1.0 1. 0 1.0 7 6 9 4 8 6 4 3 3 2 3 2 2 0 0 3 2 1 0 RECEIVING - Top Twenty TANDEM OFFENS E - Top Twenty Yds Aver Cght Rush Pass Rec Yds Ttl Game TDR Player & School G Cgt Gnd Gain Pr&n TD Player & School G Yds Yds Yds Aver Cox, Vandy ii 48 783 16. 3 4 . 4 3 Alexander, LSU 11 1686 17 00 1783 16 2 . 1 17 Newsome, Ala. n 36 804 22.3 3.3 4 Threadgill,M.St. 11 274 1317 2 1593 14 4". 8 8 Harper, Tenn. 10 30 331 11.0 3.0 1 Wright, Vandy 11 188 1383 - 1571 14 3. 7 9 McDole, M.St. n 29 510 17.6 2.6 2 Rutledge, Ala. 11 311 12 0"7 - 1518 138. 0 12 Chandler, Fla. 10 25 490 19.6 2.5 6 Ramsey, Ky. 11 618 892 848 - 1510 137. 3 19 Trosper, Ky. 11 25 340 13. 6 2.3 4 LeCount, Fla. 11 628 17 14 93 1 35. 7 9 Carson, LSU 11 23 552 24.0 2.1 10 Streater, Tenn. 10 397 742 - 1139 113. 9 12 Weathers, Miss. 11 23 395 17.2 2.1 4 Ellis, Miss. 8 303 551 - 854 106. 8 8 Brown, Vandy 11 23 146 6.3 1.1 1 Ensminger, LSU 11 206 952 - 1158 105. 3 15 Chatman, M.St. 11 22 266 12.1 2.0 1 Crane, Aub. 9 171 679 — 850 94. 4 6 Kemp, Vandy 11 21 350 16.7 1.9 1 Davis, Ala. 11 931 - 49 980 89. 1 5 Arbo, Tenn. 11 20 314 15.7 1.8 2 Cribbs, Aub. 11 872 - 57 929 84. 5 4 J.Moore, Tenn. 10 18 275 15.3 1.8 2 Chandler, Fla. 10 353 — 490 843 84. 3 .12 Quintela, LSU 10 18 215 11.9 1.8 1 Pyburn, Ga. 8 348 312 - 660 82. 5 6 D.Johnson, M.St. 9 14 176 12-6 1.6 2 D.Johnson, M.St. 9 529 - 17 6 705 78. 3 4 Parrish, Vandy 11 16 102 6,4 1.5 0 Finch, Tenn, 11 770 - 76 846 76. 9 9 Gaffney, Fla. 11 14 319 22.8 1.3 2 Garner, Miss. 9 228 462 - 69 0 76. 6 7 Wilson, Ky. 11 14 247 17.6 1.3 3 Green, Fla. 10 - 696 17 34 747 74. 7 3 Franklin, Aub. 11 13 389 29.9 1.2 3 Newsome, Ala. 11 — - 8Q_4 8 04 73. 1 4 Murray, Ga. 11 13 216 16.6 1.2 0 Cox, Vandy 11 — — 771 771 71. 8 3