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6 > Page 6 of Appeal of Cassius M. Clay to Kentucky and the world.

6 i mmortal W ashington, and such was ours. But we are told, the enunciation of the great and soul-stirring principles of Revolutionary patriots was a lie, as a dog returns to his vomit we are to go back to the foul and cast-off rags of European tyranny to h ide our nakedness; slavery, the most unmitigated, the lowest, basest that the world has seen, is to be substituted forever for our better, more glorious, holier aspirations, the constitution is torn and trampled under foot, j ustice and good f aith in a nation are d erided, brute force is substituted in the place of high moral t one: all the great principles of national liberty, which we i n herited from our B ritish ancestry, are yielded up, and we are left without God or hope i n the world. When the great hearted of our land w eep, and the man of reflection maddens in the contemplation of our national apostacy, there are men pursuing gain and pleasure, who smile with contempt and indifference at their appeals. But remember you who dwell in marble p alaces that there are strong arms, and fiery hearts, and iron pikes i n the streets, and panes of glass only between them and the s ilver plate on the board, and the smooth skinned woman on the ottoman. When you have mocked at virtue, denied the agency of God in the affairs of men, and made rapjne your honied f aith: t remble! for the day of retribution is at hand and the masses w i l l be avenged." A fter I h ad w r i t t e n this, a ride *to the o ffice c aused a r elapse. W h i l s t I l a y prostrate w i t h disease, it w a s told m e , a f e w minutes b efore 3 o 'clock, o f the fourteenth day o f August, that there w a s to be held, at that hour, a m eeti n g o f the citizens at the Court H o u s e , i n L e x i n g t o n , for t he purpose of suppressing the T r u e A m e r i c a n . I i m mediately r ose a nd dressed m y s e l f ; and i n opposition to t he remonstrances of m y f a m i l y , and at the risk Tjf m y l ife f rom the exertion, I determined to confront my e nemies f ace to f ace, a nd vindicate m y c ause a t a l l hazards. A t t he Court H o u s e I found about t hirty i n d i v i d u a l s , i n c l u d i n g a f e w w h o c ame i n after I l e f t ; their names w e r e t a k e n d o w n by a c ouple o f friends, and are n o w i n m y possession. A l l these m e n had g r o w n from p o l i t i c a l o pponents t o personal enemies, b ecause o f m y devotion t o the W h i g cause, e xcept t wo, " a W h i g " and " J u n i u s , " w h o were influenced no doubt by feelings of revenge, o n a ccount of the castigation w h i c h I had g i v e n them, i n the first number of the T r u e A m e r i c a n , for their m enace o f t he murderous infliction of L y n c h l a w . A f t e r a silence o f about h a l f an hour, E . Q. Sayre said, he w o u l d speak