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Page 4 of Address of Mrs. Cora Wilson Stewart before the Southern Educational Association, Houston, Texas, December 1, 1911 / Cora Wilson Stewart.

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THE CHAIR: It is with great pride and pleasure that I present the next speaker, who is a Kentucky product, a "live wire" of the Kentucky mountains. I have often thought that if she in her environment can do great things, how much more should we, who live in so much better environment, accomplish. Her environment is to that of yours what Helen Kellar's is to the normal child. The lady whom I shall introduce to you is the only County Superin- tendent in the United States who has established night schools in every school of her county. In these schools men and women students from 21 to 86 years of age have learned to read and write. Last year more than 1,200 of these older students attended the night schools. I now take great pleasure in introducing to you Mrs. Cora Wilson Stewart, Superintendent of Rowan County, Kentucky, who also has the honor of being President of the Kentucky Educational Association. (Applause.) Mrs. Stewart held the closest attention of the large audience during the presentation of the following paper, the reading of which was frequently interrupted by applause. THE EDUCATION OF THE MOUNTAIN CHILD MRS. CORA WILSON STEWART, MOREHEAD, KY. The mountain child, so long isolated and retarded, so long enslaved by poverty and ignorance, so long imprisoned between high hills and bridgeless streams, has missed much in the march of civilization; but has preserved the purity of his Anglo-Saxon blood, and has gathered strength, fresh- 4