Collections: 
0-9 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

Page 938 of Annals of the West : embracing a concise account of principal events which have occurred in the western states and territories, from the discovery of the Mississippi valley to the year eighteen hundred and fifty-six.

item | thumbnails | details | text | pdf
Download this image
938 MISSOURI FINALLY ADMITTED INTO THE UNION. 1821. sense of the Constitution of the United States, remains as it was before the action of Congress and the Legislature of Missouri. In the month of August, the president having received an authentic copy of the "Solemn Public Act," made proclamation that tbe reception of Missouri was complete. During the preceding session of Congress, the Senators and Representatives of this State had no seat in Congress, and tbe votes for president were not counted. As the admission of Missouri to become a sovereign State, was a subject which excited more than ordinary interest, the account here given is somewhat elaborated; especially that the reader may learn that there were two questions and lico compromises, and hereafter not confound the events nor their dates, as many have done heretofore. In November, of the previous year, Governor Cass had written to the War Department, proposing a tour along the Southern shore of Lake Superior, and toward the beads of the Mississippi; the purposes being to ascertain the state of the fur trade, to examine the copper region, and especially to form acquaintance and connections with the various Indian tribes. In the following January, the Secretary of War wrote, approving the plan; and in May, the expedition started. A full account of it by Mr. Schoolcraft,* is easily accessible, and we need only say that it was attended with as much success as could have been hoped for. During this year, and from this time forward, treaties were made with the Western and North-Western tribes extinguishing by degrees their title throughout a great part of the original northwestern territory: of these treaties we shall not, hereafter, speak particularly, excepting as far as they stand connected with the Black Hawk war of 1832. "In the ordinance of Congress authorizing the formation of a State Constitution for Indiana, four sections, containing two thousand five hundred and sixty acres of land were donated for the permanent seat of government. Commissioners on the part of the State were appointed in 1820, to make the selection, and in 1821 the town of Indianapolis was laid out."| * Schoolcraft, vol. i. published at Albany, in 1821. f Indiana Gazetteer.