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[35]

Part of Minutes of the University of Kentucky Board of Trustees

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Education in the State University of Missouri. I have assisted him and his enterprises as far as I could, giving him officer room in the Administration building and furnishing him, so far as I was able, with all the aid and assistance that he needed. Mr. Harrison's work, in a very large Dart, is pure Extension Work, and I suggest, to aid the farmer as far as possible, the Extension Denartment should take over a pro rata of his salary, equal to what he does in Extension Work. This would draw the farmers closer to us, aid them in a most laudable enterprise, and at the same time greatly facilitate the work the great Extension Department is doizg. This would bring us in close touch with the great principles of cooperation among farmers and enable us to teach in a practical way, the farmers the absolute necessity of their cooperating with each other and with the State of Kentucky in building up an Agri- cultural interest and Agricultural Education. This is made as a suggestion to be taken up and considered by the Extension Department at some time in the near future, and if the wisdom of the suggestion commends itself to them, I hope they will adopt it. I wish to reiterate that every interest in the Commonwealth is involved in the fate of Agriculture; it is the basis of the large part of our real wealth. Unless the farmer prospers, every other business must correspondingly suffer; if he is prosperous, every other interest is prosperous. It matters little how much money you spend on pensions or criminals or idiots, on the insane, the deaf and dumb, the halt and the lame, if you do not dry up the fountains of the farmers' wealth; if you make his farm fertile, his crops smile in the waving fields and his bins and granaries burst in the exuberance of their overflow, he cares not what taxes you take or spend. This University is valuable to the Commonwealth of Kentucky just in proportion as it stimulates every intellectual interest and aspiration of its people. In other words, it must bring to every man the last word in science which is interesting to his business or necessary to his life. It must educate and ennoble all the children of all the people of the Commonwealth. Respectfully submitted (Signed) Henry S. Barker