Collections: 
0-9 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

6 > Page 6 of Aikenside / by Mary J. Holmes.

AIKENSIDE thought this note, with its P. S., decidedly girlish. Still he made no comment, either verbal or men- tal, so flurried was he with knowing that the evil he so much dreaded had come upon him at last. Had it been left to his choice, he would far rather have extracted every one of that maiden's teeth, than to have set himself up before her like some horrid ogre, asking what she knew. But the choice was not his, and, turning to the boy, he said, laconically, " Tell her to come." MIost men would have sought for a glimpse of the face under the bonnet tied with blue, but Dr. Holbrook did not care a picayune whether it were ugly or fair, though it did strike him that the voice was singularly sweet, which, after the boy had delivered his message, said to the old man, "Now, grandpa, we'll go home. I know you must be tired." Slowly Sorrel trotted down the street, the blue ribbons fluttering in the wind, while one little un- gloved hand was seen carefully adjusting about the old man's shoulders the ancient camlet cloak which had done duty for many a year, and was needed on this chill April day. The doctor saw all this, and the impression left upon his mind was that Candidate 'No. i was probably a niceish kind of a girl, and very good to her grandfather. But what should he ask her, and how demean himself toward her Monday afternoon was frightfully near, he thought, as this was only Sat- 6