Collections: 
0-9 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

Page 34 of An account of Bon Harbor, in the state of Kentucky, on the Ohio River, one hundred and sixty miles below the falls; possessing extensive coal mines, great advantages for manufacturing, ship building, etc., and destined to become a place of great importance ..

item | thumbnails | details | text | pdf
Download this image
34 and from the natural location, there seems very little cause for disease, after this. Respectfully yours, (Signed) R. W. MURRAY. W. H. HOWARD. Annexed is an extract from the National Intelligencer relative to the probability of the west being the great manufacturing region of the United States: also remarks by the Louisville Currier in regard to a letter of Professor Johnson on the subject of coal as steam-boat fuel for the west. We commend to our readers the subjoined article, from the pen of a Western Correspondent, who takes a deep interest in building up Factories on the lower part of the Ohio. The writer does not espouse the ultra doctrines either of protection or free trade; but he undertakes to show that, in the present condition of the world, it is our policy to look carefully to our internal commerce and to a home market. The immense coal formation which crosses the Ohio river below the Falls will, in all probability, sooner or later, cause factories of almost every description to be established there; and it may in time become the great Manufacturing District of the United States. fuel for steamboats. We publish to-day a valuable letter from Professor Walter N Johnson, on the subject of coal fuel for steamboats. Professor Johnson was employed by Secretary Upshur, to make a series of experiments with the various coals of the United States, for the purpose of ascertaining the most appropriate article for use in the Government vessels. The report of Professor Johnson is one of the ablest scientific papers we know of, and it conclusively establishes his reputation as a man of extensive attainments, and an experimenter of the highest ability. The country is deeply indebted to Secretary Upshur, not only for the investigation he instituted, but for the aid and encouragement he gave Professor Johnson throughout the