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Page 245 of Abolitionism unveiled, or, Its origin, progress and pernicious tendency fully developed / Henry Field James.

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ABOLITI0!MISM UXNVEILED. to depart from their holy estate, so hast thou sought to entwine thyself around the heart of the poor, ignorant, confiding Slave, and lead him through the labyrinth of ruin. Happy and contented at his home, thou didst find him and poured thy poisonous breath into his ear, and brought upon him irretrievable ruin. The blood of infiwt,- like Moloch of old, has stained thy hands, because thou didst induce the mother to escape, who, if not tempted by thee, would have remained at her home, happy and con1- tented. Thou didst draw her into that perilous condition, the most friohtful to the Slave, in which, by the instiga- tion of the Devil, if not by thyself, she felt herself con- strained to pour out the blood of an innocent and harm- less child. But here, let the curtain fall-I have done with Ohio." CHAPTER XXXIII. The 'Squire and David at home-The Pony-Final Conversation. " HERE we are, at home once more," said the 'Squire to David, " and on the soil of our beloved Kentucky. We have had hairbreadth escapes from those malicious negroes in Canada, and for our escape, we are chiefly in- debted to that splendid little pony. Oh ! I must see him at once. Tell the hostler to bring him in the yard, that we may feast our eyes upon him." After a few moments' absence, David returned, and informed his uncle, the pony was in the yard. He imme- diately walked out, and addressed Henry, the hostler, in the followino words: " Well, Henry, have you treated this little horse with the utmost kindess, ever since his arrival Have you given him a-plenty of oats and hay-or whatever he most relished; and then, a-plenty of good soft straw, upon which he could repose of nights. To us, lie has been a precious pony, having borne us twice away from infuri- ated mobs of negroes in Canada. By his agility and speed, our lives have been preserved, to be present with yon ll this day." 245