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Image 10 of 1985 NCAA Championship, March 30-April 1, 1985

Part of University of Kentucky Basketball Programs (Men)

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Jim Valvano (below) and John Thomp son (below right) have expert enced the "Ultimate" — an NCAA Championship. Few moments in sports are more exhilarating for the winning coach and team — and at the same time disheartening for the losers — than that magic moment in the national championship game when it is apparent as the clock ticks down that the outcome is decided. And it has been interesting to watch in recent years how victorious coaches have reacted when they realized that their team would wear the most coveted crown in intercollegiate basketball. Sometimes it happens laser fast: Who, except Houston fans, could not share the happiness of North Carolina State's Jim Valvano at Albuquerque in 1983? Valvano set the standard for uncontrolled elation with his delightful dashes to here-there-everywhere after Lorenzo Charles' rebound shot gave the Wolfpack a pulsating 54-52 upset victory over Guy Lewis' Cougars. How many Valvano watchers remember his game stances? When his team has the ball, he takes a four-point, frog-like stance. He changes for defense to a two-point squat. The late Adolph Rupp held the pre-Valvano record when he uncharacteristically danced a jig with all-America center Alex Groza when he won one of four national championships at Kentucky.