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Page 5 of Address at the three hundredth anniversary of the settlement of Jamestown / by Hon. Thomas Nelson Page.

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so ill that his bodily sickness is noted in the report, stood forth at need the first of that courageous band of Soldiers of Christ, whose highest ambition has ever been to serve their Master faithfully by sea or land; reckoning, like the great Apostle to the Gentiles, that "the sufferings of this present time are not worthy to be compared with the glory which shall be revealed" hereafter. It was not until the 18th day of February. two months after starting, that they lost sight of the English coast and found themselves upon the shoreless sea, with naught visible but the heaving waste of waters and the heavens above. We know from the reports that they touched and rested a few days at the Azores, and found for a brief period a sum- mer land in the Islands of Dominica and of Nevis, where the wonders of the Tropics first dawned on their astonished vision. At Nevis some trouble occurred, taking shape, as is known, in something like mutiny, and because thereof, one of the chief of the voyagers fell under such suspicion that he was put under arrest, or, to use his own term, "was unjustly restrained of his liberty;" in which condition he remained until the 26th day of June following, when he was sworn of the Council of Virginia, and emerges from obscurity into the romance which has for three hundred years enveloped the fame of "Captain John Smith": Sometime, "Governor of Virginia, and Admiral of New England." It was the 26th of April when, "about four o'clock in the morning," storm-tost and travel-worn, they entered the Capes of the Chesapeake, and dropped anchor for the first time in the waters of Virginia. They anchored England to America. The day that a beseiged city capitulates is not so truly the day of its capture as the day on which the beseigers plant their standard upon the walls never again to be taken down. So, much more here. The approach had been long and ardu- ous. Effort after effort, attempt after attempt had been made 5