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42 > Image 42 of Kentuckian Volume VII

Part of University of Kentucky Yearbook Collection

of the fair co-eds, and man's natural inclination to be affected by his environment, immediately transformed not a few of this noble clan into ladies' men. Some of the efforts were of no avail, while others are expected to culminate in the not far distant future. The grand success of the Junior Prom is not to be wondered at, when the acquaintance of the class has been made. It was the most enjoyable affair of the yearnot even the wonderful, warlike '13's were able to do anything to detract from the perfection of our dance. Finally the enchanted Senior corner was reached and as the venerable Seniors gazed abroad over the sea of sparkling, youthful faces, an occasional smile would play upon their countenances when some fond recollection presented to them scenes of their "childhood" days. It was during this year on the afternoon of November 2nd, that our football eleven marched from the field, having established the unprecedented record of not having been scored against during their college career. Under the leadership of our sages, the Varsity Football squad marched on to victory, and the Basketball quintet captured the Southern championship. During this time, however, we were not wholly occupied by athletics, and upon a memorable morning in chapel unveiled a beautiful monument dedicated to the University in the form of an Honor System; nor were activities confined to this or to the class room; the literary societies and debating clubs received our hearty support, and no social function occurred at which we were not well represented. Time has flowen so swiftly, that we have hardly begun to realize that we are Seniors, and that we are about to finish the course. Are we satisfied with the four years? Who could wish to have had them different? What class has had the opportunity to watch the dear old school grow, as we have watched it? We have lived through the excitement of Willis E. Smith's disappearance, and have seen the college grow into a University. We have seen States' first president finish his work, and hand it on to a successor in every way worthy to follow him; we have stood firm to protect the inexorable right of upperclassmen to dictate to those beneath; we have upheld student government, and furnished some of our strongest members to be its officers; we have seen new buildings erected, and the campus improved; we have watched our engineering and agricultural colleges force their way to the front rank; we have helped to develop champion athletic teams; we have seen the student body more than doubled in number; and, as Seniors, we have watched our University come nobly through one of the severest tests a school ever had to undergo, and stand with unscarred record for all to see and admire. And the dearest wish of our hearts is that State may stand always for that which is noble, and excellent, and true. The coveted goal is just within our reach; only a few more weeks, and we shall go from this campus and these friends we have learned to love, and begin our lives On the campus of the world; may we live our lives there, and do our work there so as to reflect honor on our dear Alma Mater; and may the friendship we have made in these four splendid years be a source of happiness and joy to us through all future.