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Page v of Compromises of life : and other lectures and addresses, including some observations on certain downward tendencies of modern society / by Henry Watterson.

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Publishers' Note In issuing this volume of "Lectures and Addresses" the publishers are induced by many considerations to believe that they meet a requisition of the reading pub- lic. Few writers in the last three decades have been more noted, few speakers heard by larger audiences, than the editor of the Louisville Courier-Journal. As he successor of Prentice, he carried forward the work of that eminent and brilliant man to yet further achievement; succeeding, before he was thirty years of age, in combining the newspapers of the Kentucky metropolis and in creating out of the union a journal of national influence and celebrity. Although an untiring journalist, versed in the varied lore of newspaper organism and management, Mr. Watterson early became a favorite in political conven- tions and on the hustings, a popular lecturer, and a captivating occasional speaker. He led the Southern wing of the Liberal movement in 1872-a member of the famous Quadrilateral, his colleagues being Mr. Samuel Bowles, Mr. Murat Halstead, and Mr. Hor- ace White whose labors, though not so designed, cul- minated in the nomination of Horace Greelev for President. Henceforward he occupied a conspicuous position in the councils of the Democratic party, largely its platform-maker from i876 to I892. He wxras the close friend of Mr. Tilden, presiding over the National Convention which nominated the Sage of Greystone for President, and, later on, his personal representative upon the floor of the Lower House of V