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Page [NA] of Address on the life and character of the late Richard H. Menefee : delivered before the Law Society of Transylvania University, in the chapel of Morrison College in Lexington, April 12th, 1841 / by Thomas F. Marshall.

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ADDRESS. GENTLEMEN OF THE LAW SOCIETY: I am not here to recount in set phrase and with that courtesy which the living always pay to the dead, the virtues, real or supposed, of one around whose fate, youth and interesting private relations alone have cast a transient in- terest. I come not merely to acquit me of a duty to one whom I personally loved and admired, to weave a fading garland for his tomb, or scatter affection's incense over his ashes. Mine is a severer task, a more important duty. I stand here gentlemen, as a member of a great commonwealth, amidst assembled thou- sands of her citizens, to mourn with them the blow sudden and overwhelming, which has fallen upon the country. He about whose young brows there clustered most of honor-he, around whose name and character, there gathered most of public hope- the flower of our Kentucky youth, "the rose and expectancy of the fair state" lies uprooted. He, who by the unaided strength of his own great mind, had spurned from his path each obstacle that impeded and rolled back the clouds which darkened his morning march-who in his fresh youth had reached an emi- nence of fame and of influence, which to a soul less ardent might have seemed the topmost pinnacle, but which to him, was only a momentary resting place, from whence, ;vi'a aii indaz- zled eye and elastic limb, he was preparing to sprfig still up- wards and nearer to the sun of glory which gio-ved 'o'v'e himn; while the admiring crowd below were watchinla, With intensest interest each movement of his towering step, each wave of his eagle wing, "Why sudden droops his crest The shaft is sped, the arrow's in his breast." Death canonizes a great name and the seal of the sepulchre excludes from its slumbering tenant the breath of envy. I might fling the reins to fancy and indulge in the utmost latitude of