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Page 89 of Addresses delivered in honor of John Marshall Day, by members of the Fayette County Bar, February 4, 1901, Lexington, Ky.

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to be his duty-uncompromising in the maintenance of what he believed to be the right-fearless in his own conscious rectitude, and inflexible in his loyalty to his own convictions, he so bore himself during his arduous career upon the bench as to inspire in all who knew him the most perfect confidence in his incorruptible integrity. His strong friendships-and no man ever had stronger- never warped his official opinions, and no breath of sus- picion ever tainted his judicial decisions with the fault that they were dictated by his prejudices or influenced by his passions." Back to the dust, "whence they sprung," they have all passed. Noble in the conception of what was duty, and brave in its performance, they have all been summoned to appear before the bar of that inexorable court from whose decrees no error lies, and from whose judgments there is no appeal. Their mortal forms, with which the elements have long since mixed, must soon from the memory of the quick forever pass, but so long as we shall remain a liberty loving and a law-abiding people so long will their names remain as monuments to regnant law and established order. In the Court of Grand Assize, o'er which Remorseless Time presides, the final orders have been entered, and the last sentence executed. Whether those "strong and subtle energies," which here gave them such distinguished pre-emi- nence, yct serve them in the presence of some higher court; whether those "trained and quick- ened faculties" yet contend for supremacy in some greater forum; whether in some court of Last Resort, before the Great Chancellor of the Universe, they have long ago appeared, or back to dreamless dust have passed, lies yet beyond the impenetrable veil. 89