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Page 5 of Address delivered before the Colonization society of Kentucky : at Frankfort, on the 6th day of January, 1831 / by Robert J. Breckinridge.

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5 ing, also, those unknown nations inhahitine the equatorial re- gions of that continent. lisrantim peopled what tvas known to the antients as the Tlhebais, 11ermnop)olis, Memphis, aril the Del- ta of the Nile-to us, as Upper and Lower Evlpt. From hild al;o were (lescende(l, amono- other people of Awrica, the itilhari- tants of Colchlis, the ancestors of the varlike Philistines, whose descendants, until this day, if learned men are to be cre(dited, have occupied so large a space on the page of history. Plint peopled Lybia and Mauiritania, emnbraving the kingdoin of Fez, the Deserts, Algiers, and other p)ortions. From these, with such additions as einigration anald frequent conquiiest have given, it is probable that all the nations of Africa, however divided, mixed, or dispersed, originally came. Agrenor, an Egyp)tian, founded the Plicenecian Commonwealtil and the Republic of ryre. Cad inus, the son of Aoenor, found-- ed the Republic of Thebes, and intro(luce(l the use of letters in- to Greece. Cecrops, at the head of all Egyptian colony, found- e(l the Athenian State, and gave laws to the barbarous hordes of Attica. If p)rofane tra(hition is to be creditedI, these and other colonies from Africa, were dIriveen out from their native regions bv the first of the Shepherd Kings, (who were themselves the Amelekites, descendants of Canaan, another son of Ham,) who devastated Egypt at the head of two hundred antd forty thotis- and warriors, and established at 'lanais, the seat of that empire, under whose iron sway the chuosen people of Gold groanre(, undier a (espotism so bitter ill its pro-aress, so awful in its overthrow. There are several reflections here which wonderfully illuastrate, Ul)OF this fated race, the vicisitudes whic h bel(ng to all that iV human. They who gave to our ancestors the first model of those institutions which d eserve to he called free, have the lolgl- est bowed down nuder insupportable oppression. They wno, gave to Europe the first knowle(dge of the arts, and of huinan let- ters, have been shrouded in the lo:nuest and the deepedt intel4m lectual darkness. They wvho. in the career of resistless victory, first established the principle of natioanal, perpetual andt heredi- tary slavery, have the sorest, and the inost uanpitied, wept mial- der that deep and unmnitigated curse. Certain lortions of Africa were, as early as amy other regions, erectedl into regliar (oknniuuities, after tile re-peojing tile earth by the descendants of Noith. That so ate of those coma- munities very early attaiiled to a high dep ree of cultivation, wealth and(l power, there is abundaiat evidence ill profane hiisto- ry, in the Holy Scriptures, and ill those extraordinary nionil- ments of taste and magalificence, xvlaich placed beyond the lar- thest verge of knowviedge, and ais it were, beside its regular cur- rent, yet remain thie wonder aral aitoni.- haae.AL of iaankind. That their progress iln illinmorality afnd UriHe. wa. equaal to their ad-