Collections: 
0-9 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

Image 6 of The Cats' Pause, December 24, 1988

Part of The Cats' Pause

item | thumbnails | details | text | pdf
Download this image
Q)ecem/>€f 24, /enTiitted to attend an all-star high school basketball game in the company of a member of the basketball staff and a representative of the university's athletic interests. ?No. 8 alleged that a member of the basketball staff riermitted a representative of the university's athletic interests to have an improper in-person recruiting contact with a prospective student-athlete while attending a high school game in which the prospect was participating. ?No. 10 alleged that academic fraud was committed by a UK student-athlete in 1987, and that during the investigation of the fraud, the student-athlete acted contrary to NCAA provisions of ethical conduct by providing false and misleading information to university and NCAA investigators and by refusing to cooperate with the NCAA in its investigation. It also alleged that the university violated NCAA rules by certifying the student-athlete for eligibilty, and that the student-athlete participated in the 1987-88 season even though he knew he was not eligible. ?No. 11 alleged that in July 1988, a member of the basketball staff and two UK student-athletes provided false and misleading information to NCAA investigators. Following is the text of the NCAA's Supplemental Official Inquiry: 2. [NCAA Bylaw l-l-(b)] It is alleged that during the 1986-87 academic year, while recruiting prospective student-athlete Sean Higgins (Los Angeles, Calif.), men's assistant basketball coach Dwane Casey offered Higgins recruiting inducements in order to encourage the young man to sign a national letter of intent to enroll in the university: further, Casey also made similar statements to Clifford Benson-Bey, the stepfather of the young man: further. Al Ross, a representative of the university's athletics interests, confirmed these offers to the young man. and finally, during the prospect's official paid visit to the university's campus, an unidentified representative of the universits 's athletics interests made a statement that reasonably led the young man to believe that he would receive the items offered by Casey. Specifically, during a telephone conversation with the young man, Casey told Higgins that he would assist in making payments for Higgins' mother's new home; further, during Higgins' official paid visit to the university's campus. Casey told Higgins that if he would sign a letter of intent to enroll at the university, he would receive: (a) a monthly allowance of approximately $300 cash beginning at the time he signed a letter of intent and ending when he left the university; (b) an automobile upon his signing, and (c) the opportunity to obtain a different automobile after enrollment. Also, on Oct. 10, 1986, following an exhibition professional basketball game between the Los Angeles Lakers and the Chicago Bulls at the Forum in Inglewood, Calif., Benson-Bey told Higgins that during the game, Casey stated he would provide a monthly allowance to the young man, an automobile and financial assistance for the home of the young man's mother, and. finally, the young man told his father, Earle Higgins, about Casey's offer of an automobile. Also, during a telephone conversation, Ross informed the young man that whatever Casey offered him would be provided and, finally, during the young man's official paid visit, after being introduced by Casey to the prospect, an unidentified representative of the university's athletics interests confirmed to the young man that whatever Casey told him, it would be provided. 3. [NCAA Bylaws l-2-(a)-(6) and l-6-(a)] It is alleged that in July 1986, while recruiting prospective student-athlete Sean Higgins (Los Angeles, Calif), men's assistant basketball coach Dwane Casey contacted Higgins at the Slam-N-Jam basketball tournament at Pauley Pavilion on the campus of the University of California, Los Angeles, during a period when such in-person, face-to-face recruiting contacts were not permitted under NCAA legislation; further, in September 1986, during Casey's attendance at a practice at the young man's high school, Casey shot baskets with the prospect. 4. [NCAA Bylaws l-l-(b)-(l), l-2-(a)-(4), l-2-(b), l-9-(a) and l-9-(d)] It is alleged that on at least one occasion during the summer of 1987, Bill Chupil, a representative of the university's athletics interests, provided prospective student-athlete Lawrence Funderburke (Columbus, Ohio) and the young man's friend, Mark Johnson, round-trip automobile transportation between Columbus, Ohio, and Lexington, Ky., in order for the young men to view the university's facilities; further, on one of these occasions, upon arriving at the offices of the men's basketball coaching staff, Chupil introduced Funderburke to men's head basketball coach Eddie Sutton and men's assistant basketball coach Dwane Casey; further, Casey and Chupil took the young men on a tour of the men's basketball residence hall, Wildcat Lodge; further, Chupil purchased a Kentucky University of Kentucky assistant coach Dwane Casey is mentionea in eight of the NCAA's 13 allegations of wrongdoing released by UK. Wildcat baseball hat for Funderburke and transported the young men back to the basketball offices to visit with Sutton and Casey prior to returning home, and finally. Chupil transported the young men to the apartment of Brett [sic] Bearup, a representative of the university's athetics interests, who encouraged Funderburke to attend the university. 6. [NCAA Bylaws l-l-(b)-(l), l-2-(a)-(4), l-2-(b), l-9-(j) and l-9-(l)] It is alleged that on Oct. 14 and 15, 1987. Bill Chupil, a representative of the university's athletics interests, provided round-trip automobile transportation, a meal and a gift of clothing to prospective student-athlete Lawrence Funderburke (Columbus. Ohio) and the young man's friend, Mark Johnson, when they attended "Midnight Madness," the university's initial men's basketball practice in 1987. Specifically, Chupil transported the young men between Columbus, Ohio, and Lexington, Ky., in order to attend this practice session; further, prior to the practice, Chupil and the young men met with men's head basketball coach Eddie Sutton and men's assistant basketball coaches Dwane Casey and James Dickey at the university's basketball offices; further, following their meeting, Chupil purchased a meal at a McDonald's restaurant for the young men; further, the young men and Chupil returned to Casey's office where they watched a major league baseball playoff game on television, and finally, after practice, Chupil purchased a t-shirt for each young man. 7. [NCAA Bylaws, H-(b)-(l), l-2-(a)-(4), l-2-(b), l-9-(d), l-9-(f)-(4), l-9-(j) and l-9-(l) It is alleged that on Dec. 12, 1987, Bill Chupil, a representative of the university's athletics interests, provide prospective student-athlete Lawrence Funderburke (Columbus, Ohio) and the young man's friend, Mark Johnson, round-trip automobile transportation, lodging, meals and a gift of clothing. Specifically. Chupil transported the young men between Columbus, Ohio, and Lexington, Ky.. in order for the prospects and Chupil to attend the University of Kentucky vs. the University of Louisville men's basketball game in Rupp Arena; further. Chupil paid all lodging and meal expenses on this trip and purchased t-shirts for the young men, and finally. Chupil tcxik the young men into the university's locker room after the game where they enjoyed fruit and other refreshments while they talked with men's basketball assistant coach Dwane Casey and were introduced to several team members. 9. [NCAA Bylaws l-2-(a)-(4), l-2-(b), 1-9-0) and 1-9(1)] It is alleged that on at least two additional occasions during the 1987-88 academic year not mentioned in Allegation Nos. 4, 5, 6 and 7, Bill Chupil, a representative of the university's athletics interests, provide round-trip automobile transportation between Columbus. Ohio, and Lexington, Ky., to prospective student-athlete Lawrence Funderburke (Columbus, Ohio) and, on another occasion, provided Funderburke with round-trip automobile transportation between Columbus. Ohio, and Cincinnati, Ohio. Specifically: A. Chupil provided Funderburke and the young man's friend, Mark Johnson, round-trip automobile transportation between Columbus and Lexington in order for Funderburke to be interviewed by Oscar Combs, the publisher of 77ie Cats' Pause (a publication that promotes the university's athletics program). B. In the spring of 1988, Chupil provided Funderburke round-trip automobile transportation between Columbus and Lexington in order for the young man to attend an AAU basketball game between the Soviet National Junior Basketball Team and an AAU all-star team. C. During the weekend of March 18-20, 1988, Chupil provided Funderburke round-trip transportation between Columbus and Cincin- (Continued on page 25)