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Image 4 of Kentucky farm and home science, vol. 3 No. 3 summer 1957

Part of Kentucky Agricultural Experiment Station

.. A -2 A ll *3 .~ K Gr V M, .~/, -.7~ .',(Q_ l r' . V _ , A. A A @4 "fY7. -, = Z $}'_ , . A *4.- l &_ gp at , i., J ,4 'nZ,d,*,*i{ X t , _ ~' ." , Ji"/.~ g -,.1**:* "'f ` __ A; ,,.- if _ ia ,. T~ , J . (K A ` L -A=~-= _ , i2;"f ;~ J - i1 `&` . A A A - :~ iE4 - `i2 `SA *" . .tA. c , . v_,,4 A ``,` ;" s I`:lE iE:;` e _. - if ' Q. t ' '' _A A _ __ _ " E *f M e l , __VI W VV t Ivz, V _,l-, A V V _____v. =AA. vAAAA Z ,,__; + 4 * ?P?f* ;~Z<>" A V ` A " ` ` - i '`' ` *? ,~A A _A . =V `:AA A * V _ '` A *7 _ * T ;rAe > A,A A zz * -{A-=,.r, . - . .A - * * A AA Z, , IJ-=iit.t1 .A * H I _ { _ V V V ll VVVV VV i. ii _ __V_ l Q i _A,7 A[;VA. VV.= =v :AAA A-i-. AA~ ~ I '` ;=V _ ~~ s AAA. ef Fig. l.- More knowledge of Kentuckys rainfall character- irrigation would likely be most profitable. Records are _ l istics may help to determine those areas where supplemental available for an average of 66 years, " BETTER PLANNING OF CROP PRODUCTION MAY RESULT FROM .. . K lyRflIStdy Ollllllfj { RID 3 ll or Variation in amount and frequency during the growing _ season influences possible need for supplemental ""<` l irrigation in various sections of the state _ tif By GENE A. BRAMLETT and DANA G. CARD Grant Dam in Boone county. During the ]une-]uly- llamfall in Kentucky is fairly uniform compared Augugtbpenod tg; gtgt ageraigas li P lgzgls tif] with the wide variations which exist across the nation. VME; Btgveen Tu mc ei Z; damn O mc _S Vithin the state, rainfall varies from season to season, at evt nam` 6 gener? um gfmy Waih Or ta?_m_ _ _ from year to year, and from place to place. Moderate Cgeagzllllsi 6 migmge Him; inovgug SO? begs {O3] fluctuations do not greatly affect farming activities, t 10 _wF2'lfuU?1gt]t ep eng 427 Cho er I?;1?h but when the variations are unexpectedly extreme they iwemgc Iam S bof t G Sta? gas M lgcigsf W; 6 Hg? can upset the best-laid farming plans. Such was the Mgcst aglggmf Emg TCGWG ai aytc 1; fav]? _ case recently, when three straight years of drouth COuuty `_ 5HChS' 1 genera Wes Gill neg ug y L caught farmers overstocked in several areas of Ken- aims mcege t 6 ug est average mm a urmg __ tucky. Excess rainfall in western Kentucky during the t GSB mont S` ei early part of the 1957 growing season delayed plant- Difference in Leeqrien * ing in several areas. Current studies are attempting The accompanying graph (Fig. 2) shovvs the rne_ _ to discover just hoyv much variation can be expected dieni urnounts of rainfall received during August at during various periods of the growing season at num- 24 locations in or near Kentuclde having the longest " erous locations in Kentucky, and to state the results neriods of record The average length of record Wes 44 so that farmers can use them in planning crop pro- 66 veers, ranging from 40 years ut Mayfield to 94 duction. For example, knowledge of rainfall fre- years at Lexington The stations are arranged in order. 9* quencics and amounts could help determine whether of the median amount of rainfall in August In gen_ we supplemental irrigation would be profitable at various eral, stations vvitli the lovvest rainfall are located in l locations m the Stuff" the western part of the state and those with the highest Average Rainfall Tendencies rainfall in the southeastern part of Kentucky. The M. Dllrlllg l\l)lll and A/ItlyV il] il rcccllt 22-y;_ll pgllOd_ 1 T.l]C II'lCd1illl is .21 pOSltl01'l 8\'I'1lgC (ll\'ldS tllii Sl'lG$ ([+4 at- state tl\'Cl'ill.[t martin was vs; r..ChtAS and mea of *e1 Hem me aw Pee- O* of the hud r _ _ __ _ _ _ _ more ram than the median amount, and onehalf of the years .;1, from 5.54 inches at Mt. Sterling to 6.50 inches at had less rainfall than the median ( 4 Krwrucxr FARM AND Horns SCIENCESU)I1\IER 1957 { F