Collections: 
0-9 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

Image 3 of Kentucky farm and home science, vol. 3 No. 1 winter 1957

Part of Kentucky Agricultural Experiment Station

item | thumbnails | details | text | pdf
Download this image
no L°I;tle · Q P l , 1956 Estimate reveals small Q increase; high birtl11·ates Y T, offset by migration to .»>• nearby states hy By NORMA BREAZEALE _ "`B if Has recent industrial growth in Kentucky resulted pared with 2,945,000 recorded in the 1950 census. l in a substantial population growth? Or, is Kentucky This increase represents an annual growth rate of 9 ‘ continuing to furnish thousands yearly to the indus- slightly more than one-tenth oi 1 percent during the . dr'. trial areas of neighboring states? Are more Kentuck- 6%-year period. y. mus moving from areas Of $m?~ll‘SCal€ ?~g1“iCUltU1'€ IMO A relatively high rate of natural increase—the dif- i the cities Hlld €X ahdifl m€tf0 Ohtflfl &f€3S? The ference between number of births and deaths—added P S P ), RUSWGYS tv th€$€ and Similar qU€$ti0U$ mlatihg to approximately 50,000 new Kentuckians each year pOpul&tiOl1 t1‘€HdS Hfé of gféat imp0r’€3l1C€ to the during this period. But even this high rate failed to { l Plmm€I`$ of K€UtU€kY’$ fUtUT€· raise the state population total appreciably because •~·, A 1956 population estimate, recently published of the heavy migration of Kentucky residents to other p by the K€H'fUCl<)’ Agficultuféil Experiment St3fi0H,l states. It is estimated that some 41,000 civilian M reveals a relatively slow rate of population growth migrants leave the state each year. a loss generally ` H for the state since the census of 1950. Kentuckyls attributed to the attraction of industrial job oppor- ' estimated population for 1956 is 2,968,000 as com- tunities in the nearby states of Ohio, Indiana, and ll;. IThomas R. Ford, Population Estimates for Kentucky llllllOlS' ii.; Counties and Economic Areas, ]uIy I, 1956, Ky. Agr. Expt. hd Sta. Prog. Rept. 42. 1956. (Continued on Page II) . ·s Avzmcsa ANNUAL RATE or POPULATION CHANGE. °AmE$§lg,§Ql_l§$E,l°N GAIN toss {0 §l·°$$ lh°" @ L°$s ih°“ , ._.._., ; _, 4 * |D€fC€ht I percent ;:...·x,.\A_J Jl -| percent or Q I percent or \·· 1 ‘ '“°"° '“°'° EFFER Z" @· a s • J SON ,:?GRASS&.:;_._, tp ._._,$% V- METROPOLITAN ‘·‘* t ._._; gt; ; =· ····· I . 5 ·-\ ; ¢' $·Z·Y·Z· ' ‘`‘'‘’’’`'’ ` ‘ * · ; ii .·;——:·:·;?:-:·:¥i·~;·. '"'`:: 4f) * t I-- , sa t ee ?¢== =+= I I V" ‘'`‘ `‘"‘‘‘ qw “\ I'; F ?=i¤ "‘ ` *"‘· ‘ QJUTH U '`U: M r » ` /7 I pt :5;*- - 0}}*5 "Ei ;?¥l»¢¢ E l *·L· Qy` /’/ * ENTRAL ‘ él . 14* T mi "° '`'' . KN S GUMg_§RLA§_[L.f . **4 "¤ **··?i‘··f’::€::;$!:: " " ··!#=¤·-¥===—· ,,_,L_ .,_,·· The average annual population change in Kentucky, by moving to the state`s urban centers; others have migrated y economic area, from April 1950 to ]uly 1956. Many of to Ohio. Indiana and Illinois, F the migrants from the farms and mining towns seem to be P 0 . — KENTUCKY FARM AND Hour; Scusxcm-\V1:<‘rER 1957 :3 { I