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Image 44 of Annual report. 1908

Part of Kentucky Agricultural Experiment Station

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Spru,yi·n.g Apple Trees. 27 - Godling Moth. Other Lepidoptera. Other Insects. by J July 15 ............ None 115 38 ‘0w- July 16 ............ None 4 11 · ......... J . . 9 33 as 6 lil; $$-22 .... ii 362 m ‘P"‘ Juiy 24 ............ 1 215 399 that Aug. 6 ............ None 10 16 ex- Aug. S .......... \/None 20 73 seen Aug. 20 ............ None 269 48 ick Aug. 22 ............ None 123 95 thé Aug. 31 ......... I. .. None 620 38) . Sept. 1 ............ None 184 40 troy _; __1 _._ was Totals ......... 5 . 2016 1007 bc' In other words, about two-tenths (0.16 per cent., more exactly) 3CtS> of one per cent. of all insects captured were eodling moth, during ibla a period when theadult codling moths of the summer brood were Cod' most numerous, as shown by reared specimens and by examples > OH captured by other means. gulls The experiment proved simply that the moth is at times attract- _ IMP ed in very small numbers to light, a fact that has been verified by ml? the occasional capture of specimens about lamps indoors. one B1, a Codling Moth Attacking Peaches. _ Gm;) An interesting fact in the habits of the insect was observed on I-CGS} the Experiment Farm, August 25, 1893, when fruit of some peach MOH . trees grown in the midst of a small orchard were found to be injured Ault by eodling moth. The a.pple crop was very light, and the moths may were probably driven to the peaches by the scarcity ot their natural [wm food. Under similar circumstances, I have known peaches to be 2O_ badly injured in some neighborhoods by the plum oureulio, which PCC; seems more natural. since both plmn and peach are stone fruits. light H _ ` pl if 1HIu APPLE LEAF·ROLLER. ucd. ( . l 1·¢·71.1.ps rosac0rma») . tCtGfl The larva of this moth is generally to be found in small numbers zeord in Kentucky orchards, but the mischief done to the leaves is so rapi slight as not to attract attention. Yew and then it becomes very common and then shows a disposition to attack the young apples, especially where they hang in <·ontac·t or are closely surrounded by