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Image 1 of Kentucky fruit notes, vol. 2, No. 7, May 1944

Part of Kentucky Agricultural Experiment Station

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Vol. 2 May, 1944 NO_ 7 4l W. D. Armstrong, Horticulturist, Editor ` PEACH THINNING on txvigs 12 inches long and three > a — — · By w. D. ARMSTRONG la.? °s§Ei$?n§`Vi€is1ii$§i$SKill? ileis ° The untimely heavy freezes and loleseslloe t°_oote how leaolly a V, frosts of early April reduced the Ken- slew can bs llolneo to use lt· _ t tucky peach crop prospects; however, Several _rs¤s¤t m€th0dSi ¤S1¤B _ A number Of gt.0“.eI.S may stm have short sections of rubber hose to ; a full crop and a heavy thinning job. knock on and olsl0dg€_S0m9 Of 'fh€ The Original bud emp was the heeV_ fruits, have been described and are t test in years and the peeehes being used w1th some success. Others · bloomed earlier than in several lsilgitsln$‘§é;P€%_3kP¥6€t§€ Qf MIR? . ygay _ IO YI S IC S IH IHHIU . . ' Ttie nmsheet Ot it neeeh cme the Eison orchard, n_ear_Paduca%1, the brings to mind the laborious fruit stlok Ynolnoo Of thmmng has been thinning operation that is ahead if nsoo for ssysrsl YEQYS and IS €0¤· ~_ the crop suffers no further cold or slooleo sa_USfnClo¥`Y End T8Pld· A frost damage. The current. labor SU`sn_gnt Stick O? 3_ D1€9€ Cut fY01’¤ H shortage will make the operation dif- sapllng about ei" in d13m?t€1` and 5 ficult and it will bc up te the feet long IS used. One end is flattened " growers to work out their labor dnhn to 6 l0¤S 0V31~_ W€dg€·Sh3D€d problems and decide on a method of Point that can bs €3S1lY 1¤S€i`t€d b€· ` thinning that will enable them to l“'€€¤ P€€¤€h€$ Bild 1¤'f0 l3Yg€ CIUS- ‘ cover the greatest number of trees WTS and D81‘t_ sf 'fh€m d1Sl0dg€d Y in the time available. The old sys- Simply l>>‘_Y¤1`¤1¤g this Siiffk- Wh€1'€ ‘ ‘ ‘ wm or hand thinning is slow and peaches imc both sides of a twig. while satisfactory in normal times s11_¤>¤ sms side can bedislcdgsd by 1011 tl can hardly bg dgpgndgd upgn gy]- Q·L1ICkI§` 1`bllJl)lIlgtI'l€ StlCl( 3IOIlg {ITIS APW V tirely by the large grower in 1944. Edo. {SIMS 1`€1T1%V€S halfd USB fliuitt _ Time to Thin ie o ers can e space y sior t ust . . . . . uick movements of the stick. It aulnle. i . Mush lnlnnlng ln Geolegla ls none should be pointed out that this is not worn I ln the Pink ono and blossom stage a beating or thrashing practice but the the hand and Ubloushl, rather 3 rubbing and ()p€]'8— ' but it » msthsd- Thess msthsds wsfk satis- tion that when used by s Cassini them, fsctsrily ln seotlons not frequently operator does very little bruising of It 1`cl navlng el”oP‘Yeollolng flosls ol` twigs and foliage. This method is y and t frsszss sftsr blossolnlng ln msst suggested for trial. After a crew has ‘ Bd. it other seetlons tlllnnlng ls genelally been instructed, the owner can soon ry! done between the time of the June ptek ent the Ones whe are taking te drop and pit hardening time. Tests tt The Others een then he given ln llllnols and olllel states have additional instruction or put to thin- Shown that while the greatest bencnt ning h`. et different method Ot. put at nk is frfotn the zarlteiti thgnning, some other g\,Ot.k_ rlshtnk CDC IS C21!] C IH 1 llllllllllg IS _ · - » , V siting 4 dm Msht on Us *0 hsosst time iis?b2‘Z?$‘2L°%$?€iiltifaltcilliiitlials lol do Th¤¤¤¤¤¤ Methods blossomed and set before pruning. sci Qt ‘ 'One should follow a rather deli- Then at pruning time the fruit can ` Qld n· llltc method of thinning to insure a be thinned also by clipping out heav- °ol`n‘_ Slmcing of the fruits that will permit ily fruited twigs and small limbs. mY ol Sfttisfactory development. Then after this type of thinning iS '“'nn· _ Asimplc rule of thinning followed done a small amount of touch-up _Wol`e 111 Some states is as follows: Leave by other methods is needed. —allol`e 0YlC peach on twigs 6 inches in Even where pruning has been done t gmx lifngth and less, leave two peaches earlier, some growers prefer to take BULLETIN OF THE KENTUCKY AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY `