Collections: 
0-9 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

Image 3 of Inventory of the Records of the Work Projects Administration in Kentucky

Part of Kentucky Works Progress Administration Publications

item | thumbnails | details | text | pdf
Download this image
l PREFACE Inventories are basic archival finding aids which establish intellectual control over a record group and acquaint the public with a record group's content. The Division of Archives and Records Management defines a record group to be the records of a single major unit of government. The Division prepares two types of records inventories. Inventories of records of agencies still in existence are called preliminary inventories, since they will be updated periodically. The second type, known simply as inventories, describes closed record groups. A record group is considered closed when the agency of origin no longer exists and no new records are being created. The inventories are compiled only after it has been determined that the records are as complete as possible, and have been properly arranged and accur . rately described. The inventory of the Work Projects Administration in Kentucky is of the second type. Each inventory contains an introduction which out- ’ lines the history and function of the agency that created the records. Also indicated is the physical history of - the records themselves. Records of the record group which are in other repositories are usually not described, but their locations are noted in the introduction. Those repositories consulted which do not have records belonging to the record group are also identified. Within the record group records are arranged and described by subgroups and series. The series are arranged under the subgroup constituting the records' office of origin. A series description will provide the record's title, inclusive dates, quantity, arrangement, relationships to other series, and description of signifi- cant subject content. Sub-series are occasionally used to further differentiate similar or related records. A iii