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Image 56 of Annual report. 1914

Part of Kentucky Agricultural Experiment Station

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Kentucky Agricultural Experiment Station. 39 T- combination with other feeds, for hogs on pasture. One lot of hogs was _fed in the dry lot for comparative purposes. The plan of. the experiment was as follows: Fifty—four shotes, averaging 68.6 pounds, were divided into four lots and fed as follows: Lot 1, consisting of 15 pigs, was allowed the run of a pasture of rape and oats, and it · was fed all the distillers’ dried grains it would eat without _ waste; Lot 2, consisting of 14 pigs, was allowed the same kind of pasture and given from two and one-half to three per cent of its weight in corn meal per day; Lot 3, consist- ing of 15 pigs, was given a similar pasture and allowed two and one-half to three per cent of its weight per day of a mixture of corn meal five parts and distillers’ dried grains one part. For comparative purposes, the fourth lot of 10 pigs was confined in a dry lot and given a full feed of corn meal Eve parts and distillers’ dried grains one part. Pro- fessor D. W. May, formerly of this Station, determined while here that no greater proportion of distillers’ dried grains to corn than is represented by one to five produced good results for pigs fed in the dry lot. The pigs in our experiment were fed seventy—three days. The average daily gain per pig in the different lots was as follows: Lot 1, .456 pound; Lot 2, .931 pound; Lot 3, 1.027 pounds; and Lot 4, .883 pound. The number of pounds of grain for a hundred pounds of gain in the different lots was as follows: Lot 1, 368; Lot 2, 344; Lot 3, 300; and Lot 4, 444. The cost of a hundred pounds of gain in the different lots, not considering the cost of the pasture, was $4.97 for Lot 1: $4.95 for Lot 2; $4.27 for Lot 3; and $6.32 for Lot 4. The above Hgures were based on corn at 75 cents per bushel, plus $2.00 per ton for grinding; distillers’ dried grains, $25.00 per ton, plus freight, $2.00 per ton. This experiment showed Lot 1, receiving distillers’ dried grains alone on pasture, did not make the gain that was made by any of the other three lots; in fact, the average gains of Lots 2 and 3 were more than double that of Lot 1, and, at the same time, a hundred pounds of gain were made on 68 pounds less feed in Lot 3, and 24 pounds less feed in Lot 2, than in Lot 1. The gains