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Image 7 of The Kentuckian : a monthly magazine, vol. 2, no. 2

Part of The Kentuckian : a monthly magazine

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..s. i A or c — r — ‘ A -5%: , · i _ .~?{’j`;`i€i· " L~ ‘ ‘ i A y » ·-»- » . ‘ T A STUDY OF WORDS. q 153 . _ _ cated him. Whether from Shetland Isles or Arabian _ Plains, or Kentucky Blue Grass the neighing of the horse is the same. The Texas cow boy hears today the same lowing of the herds that jacob did. . . p " , Man’s language is his chief legacy from the past and t his richest bequest to the future. It has become the most , i- Q Q plenteous source of his knowledge. It is that which ~ ‘ _ · _ ‘ touches nearest his soul, possesses the least of earthy clay and its consequent mortality. It alone throws a glow of ’ life over the dead past. We travel far to visit scenes 01 A human experience——battle grounds, buried cities, massive l A ruins and ancient relics, but the vastest structure ofrnan’s ‘ genius lies about us. It is like solid masonry built by · ~ hands, and yet has power to grow and die like a thing I , ‘``` "·—· possessed ot life. It is labyrynthian in structure where the great irmilies of language are ramihed and interlaced. . There is the American Indian with its power of agglutina- A tion or growing ofwords together, its beautiful metaphors and soft euphoneous cadences. We have borrowed many S _ A place names from them and should have borrowed many · 4 more. For example, Kentucky, dark and bloody ground ; _ » lVIississippi, father of waters ; Missouri, big muddy ; Ohio, beautiful ; Rappahannock, quick rising water ; l\‘linne— V haha, laughing water ; Chicago, wild onion ; Chautauqua, ` t foggy place; Saratoga, miraculous waters, and many others. How much prettier Chatterawa, rippling over _ rock, than our own. Big Sandy. S ‘_ if gf There may be seen in this labyrynth the Semitic lan- _, ` guage with its glorious coloring and rich learning whose n ij ‘ iridescence shines along the remotest past. `It embraces _ % ii;. ` the ancient Egyptian, from which we derive our system of A = if . months and years, weights and measures, and which as A _ i * has been said Moses spoke but joseph had to have inter- A Y _` `_ preted to him. To the Semitic belongs the Hebrew, in _ ~ Y--is r s ° . V Fi? ` A . .-.,, c S ‘ · A l A Q,. ,.r. _,