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Part of Minutes of the University of Kentucky Board of Trustees

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MINUTES OF THE BOARD OF TFUSTEES,Dec.l1, 1906 Page 112(contl' Up)on the motion of President Patterson, seconded by Judge Barker and. dauly carried it was Resolved that the minutes of the Executive Committee be refered to the Appropriate Committee/ Upon motion of President Patterson, seconded by Mr. Mc- Ohord and carried the minutes of the Faculty since the last meeting of the Board were refered to the Executive Committee with power to act. Upon motion of President Patterson, seconded by Judge Lafferty and carried the minutes of the Special Faculties were refered to the Executive Committee wi.th nower to act. Upon motion of President Patterson, seconded by Mc~hord and carried, the Executive Committee appointed in June Last is continued until next June. At this point President Patterson read to the Board his Report, which is as follows- To the Honorable Board of Trustees of the State of Ken- tucky. Gentlemen:- There is ordinarily any occasion to present more than a brief report to the Board of Trustees at the Midwinter meeting. There are ,however, a few matters of interest and importance which may be presented for your consideration during the present meeting. First:- The matriculation this year largely exceeds that of any previous one. When the Board met in December 1905, there were on the College register 563 names. Today there are 633. The various Summer Schools of 1906- Engineering, Classical, Mathematical, Normal and various departments in Science had. much larger numbers in attendance than in proceed- ing year. The present outlook is that if the usual percentage of increase after the holidays be maintainr d, the Catalogue for the current year will show not far from a thousand names. This is very gratifying. It shows that notwithstanding the opposition of other institutions and of those interested in their maintenance, the unfriendly attitude of some of our own people and the apathy others, that the college is steadily growing in public estimation and is rapidly becoming recognized