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Part of Minutes of the University of Kentucky Board of Trustees

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MINUTES OF THE BOARD OF TRIJSTEES,Dec. 11, 1 06 Pane 113(0ont'd) as the representative institution of the Oommonwealth. The State Improvement Association which met in October in Winchester, the Grange Association which met in Lexington during the same month, the various Farmer's Institutes whicha met in the dif- ferent parts of the State, and county and District schools In- stitutes have al1 passed resolutions con.ending the college and its work. They have,moreover, with singtlar unanimity urged upon the Legislature and Legislation necessary to make it a University-the University of the State of Kentucky, We have now arrived at a period in our expansion when this should be done, and I recommend that the Board take appropriate action with reference thereto. Almost every Land Grant College has either developed into a University or become an integral part of a University. Page 114 Second- Twenty years ago, the whole time of the Collegiate year from September to June, with the exception of legal holi- days was given to study and class-room work. This, however, cannot now be said. Almost as soon as college work begins, foot-ball teams are organized ant, begin training. Twenty or thirty men are withdrawn for athletic exercise almost every afternoon. This interferes with the preparation of lessons with military requirements, gymnastic training and laboratory work to a very serious degree, journeys long and short, invol- ving absences, are undertaken to play match games. The whole student body is frequently detained after chapel in order to work up an artificial interest for contributing money to meet exoenses. Games are preceeded and accompanied by an excite- ment sometimes stimulated by reprehensible indulgences and money in greater or lesser sums is lost and won. I think that you can readily see that this is an atmosphere uncongenial to study and tends to defeat the purpose for whichihe college is organized and to disappoint the expectations of those who send their sons hither. From the end of November till about the middle of March, when the base-ball season begins, there is a comparative lull and during the interval the serious work of the year is done. I do not speak of broken noses, legs and arms, but of the time wasted, idleness encouraged and a heritage of demoralization carried over to the suceeding year. This is a serious matter and deserves your careful consideration. An exceeding regrettable occurrence took place on Hal- loween. The ex eriences of former years had. led me to expect some disturbance. I had consequently on the day proceeding Hallowe'en detained the young men after chapel services and enjoined upon them the necessity of not allowing fun to run int riot. I sent also for the cadet officers on the 31st October and requested their co-oneration in the maintenance of order.