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Image 8 of The State College cadet, vol. 7, no. 7, April 1897

Part of The State College cadet

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I 34 THE CADET. II I comments on current topics, which I had so confidently I expected, but for some unknown reason, they refused to flow. / I said one or two things in a manner remarkable more i`? — Q i for its iinbecility than anything else, and then relapsed into a silence that bade fair to last as long as my call ` , did, but Dulcie’s surprised expression at length forced me to summon my last expiring atom of sense, and I said, ‘·Miss Dulcie, I came to see you this afternoon to ,3II I I ask you—to ask you—a question. Will you—won’t you y PI. —will you go walking with me this afternoon, such I r glorious weather, you know," I finished with suspicious . II celerity. . I Dulcie gave a funny little half laugh, but assented V readily, only saying as she put on her hat in the front ; hall, that we had better take an umbrella, for April ~ · weather was not to be trusted. \Ve chose a quiet street ‘ that leads into a country road which is very little , I frequented, and as I had not yet collected suflicient mind ’ Q to say anything, Dulcie discoursed at great length as to I i the peculiar advantages which her umbrella possessed _ over any other umbrella. It seemed that it was a new , » ‘ patent; it worked with a spring, you touch the spring X gently and it opens, touch it again, it shuts. I J During this thrilling conversation, in which both of - us seemed to take as lively an interest as though it were a matter of vital importance, an opportunity was ee ° given for an exhibition of the phenomenal powers of the umbrella, for it began to rain. I touched the spring; it V did not open. Perhaps I had not been gentle enough j with it. Itouched it again. It remained stubbornly closed. Imnst confess that this conduct puzzled and r grieved me I would not have thought it of that um- I brella. Some umbrellas might have taken a mean spite _ in seeing my new suit gradually shrink into the sem- "~— {ii ,,