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[5]

Part of Minutes of the University of Kentucky Board of Trustees

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PRESIDENT'S REPORT TO THE TRUSTEES February 17, 1970 1. SPRING ENROLLMENT SHOWS MORE NEW FRESHMEN More complete registration figures for the Spring Semester 1970 reflect a total enrollment of 14,955, compared with a Spring Semester 1969 enrollment of 14,224, or a 5.1 percent increase, reports Dean of Admissions Elbert Ockerman. Selected points of interest concerning the enrollment: --the new student enrollment (895) replaced the December graduating group (859); --an increase in new freshmen over last Spring of 182 vs. 108; --an increase in new graduate students of 293 vs. 226; and --an increase in Community College transfer students to the Lexington campus of 162 vs. 127. Dr. Ockerman and four of his staff (Larry Dykes, Dick Stofer, Ed Brand and Jerry Booher) spent two days, February 5-6, visiting 17 high schools in north Kentucky. They spent two to three hours in each school. Similar visits were to the Louisville-Jefferson County area in December and "proved to be very successful," Dr. Ockerman said. 2. NEW AG FACILITY WILL BENEFIT INDUSTRY, CONSUMER, SAYS DEAN Kentucky's livestock industry and consumers will have an even stronger ally in the College of Agriculture now that the new Animal Sciences Building is underway, says Dean Charles E. Barnhart of the College of Agriculture. Ground breaking ceremonies today for the 6- million dollar structure, described as one of the finest in the nation, got things officially underway for the building, scheduled for com- pletion early in 1972. Dean Barnhart said expansion in the college was "timed perfectly with Kentucky's agricultural progress. Livestock is taking a more prominent place in the state's agriculture, contrib- uting more than a half billion dollars annually to Kentucky's gross income. This new facility will allow us to increase our teaching, research, and Extension support to the producers, packers, processors, and consumers who will buy these products." The cube-shaped structure will house, for the first time in modern history, all animal sciences department faculty under one roof, Dr. W. P. Garrigus, department chairman, said.