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News clippings. "Reforms In Surgeon Ranks Are Demanded By Dr. Rankin." Chicago, Illinois. "RANKIN WILL ADDRESS BRITISH, IRISH SURGEONS, 1953

Part of Fred W. Rankin, M.D. Scrapbooks

Page 12 TG Gmdfl G Y I'. GD H1 A C1 4 B D R k· CHICAGO, Oct. 9 (IP)-The new *—j"‘j ’ head of the American College of ` Surgeons said tonight the college . ‘ must end fee splitting, ghost sur- ,— gery and the charging of exorbit- . I ·» ant fees. ' i Dr. Fred W. Rankin, of Lexing- V _ ton, Ky., spoke after a ceremony, . Z ? at which he was installed as presi- dent of the college and 1,100 new fellows were inducted, l , , I "Let us admit," Dr. Rankin said, if-- "that there are still men in our V profession—fortunate1y their num- ber is sma1l—who practice divi- V. sion of fees, who do ghost surgery, - , who perform unnecessary opera- tions, and who charge exorbitant V tees for their services." _ _ _ . The responsibility of the Col- . lege of Surgeons, he said, is "to ” ,_ make every effort to end these . _` practices" which have been con- demned by the American Medical · . Association and by numberous . · state medical groups. ~ ‘° Dr. Rankin said that "in many ` respects surgeons carry the heav- ’ , ` iest responsibilities of all physi- ~ · cialis, if only because of the harm ‘ _ they can do." , ,For that reason, he said, and _ because the field of medical __,- knowledge is too broad for any _ one man to master it, specializa- . ‘ tion is necessary. _ "I am convinced," Dr. Rankin · · said, "that we do not have too _ , - many adequately trained special- ‘ ists, and I am equally convinced that surgery is too often done by — · _ . men of too little training and _ experience. "This problem will not be solved by attempts to delineate . _ the boundaries between minor and — major surgery. Minor surgery, when done by an unskilled hand, ’ A is major surgery.” ° _ . Dr. Rankin said that high ’ » ~ ethical standards, "honesty, integ- · _ rity and the stoutness of character » to which we give the old-fash- ; , ioned name of uprigh»tness," are ‘ "still the spiritual values which — — men should live by." Yet, he said, "there are some in V - our midst who do not recognize their .obligations or who, recog- V . nizing them, lack the courage to . ` live by them. They fall into the V - twin- pitfalls of avarice and ill- ' gotten gains." , - Dr. Rankin said that during the V past ye. {attempts have actually been m in certain medical ‘ . organiza? ’ to discipline the _re- : gents; of t IS college who simply i ' told fthe truth about these invidi- ‘ - ous practices in press conferences. : _ These attempts did not succeed. I ` . V doubt that such attempts will ever Y , · l succeed. V : “But that the issue should ever I g—· have been raised at all leaves one . ‘ wondering? < . HE posed the question, ,"Are ` — some, of our professional short- j V comirtgs but p-art of an evolution- 5 ¢ · __ ary-cycle? - "For my own part, I refuse to { ‘ believe it. The goal of our pro- I fession is still service."