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 ‘% ' THE KENTUCKY ALUMNUS 39  
  1
  s. c. Centre.  
Z  Slade ............................. R. E. ..................... . ...... Blaydes  
  Humphrey ........................ R. T. .,,....................... ...Staples if
 {J Straus, '9S ........................ R. G, .............................. Baird  
Q; Clark ..................... . ......... C ...,............   ........... Foreman ll
 Q. Whayne ............... . ........... L. G. ..,......................... Harlan ll;
,  Hogg ............................. L. T. ......................... . .... Steely li?
?‘ Harvey ................. . .......... L. E, ........................ .. .Mannieri gt?
 li Severs ......... ‘ .................... Q .......................... VanWinkle ll;
t  Reese ............................. R. H. .................... Anderson-Cook  
  Elliott .................... . ........ L. H. ............................ Wilson  
 *j Asher ............... . ............. F. B. ............................. . .....  
  It appears that Campbell resigned the captaincy before the season was over Qtl
  and Severs was elected in his place.  
Q It will be noted that one of the above players on the Centre team-Steely-  
 QQ was formerly a student at S. C., and a member of the foot-ball team there. It  
  only goes to show how very little college loyalty there was among some of lt
 gl the students in those days.  
  The ,97 team was the weakest S. C. had put forth since foot—ball was Q
 Q; inaugurated in the college, and yet it was practically this same team that in ll.
  ’98 was to be one of the strongest, if not the strongest, that ever represented the  
»  institution.  
l  It was during this season, to the best of my recollection, that the covered il
  grand stand on the grounds burned down, due to unslacked lime having been  
  carelessly stored under it. A rain came up one night soon thereafter, the
  ground under the stand was flooded, the lime slacked, the barrels caught fire, `I
  and the stand was consumed before morning.
  This was a considerable loss, for though a very modest structure, there `
  were no funds to replace it.
  The Grounds Improvement Company had gone out of existence. It was l
  started entirely in the interest of the students, because there seemed no other `
  way by which improvements could be secured for the grounds. However, with ,
g  the rapid changing personnel of the student body, it was evident that there 3
‘·  was a growing feeling in it that it was being exploited in some way by this `
  company. The student management endeavored to hold back from the gate ‘
  receipts the per cent that was due the company. Rather than be placed in
5 this attitude, the stockholders in the company, therefore, voluntarily, made a
  present of their stock to the Athletic Association.
.  Within a short time from this the stand was gone, the fence rapidly going
f to pieces, the track badly in need of repairs. —
  Such a thing as a sinking fund for such purposes would never occur to
(  student management, which is entirely concerned with affairs of present *
  moment. {
 i It became necessary, therefore, for the Faculty Athletic Committee to
  assume a greater control of financial matters connected with athletics, as well
  as questions of eligibility.
i  (T0 be continued in next issue.)
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