xt705q4rk235 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt705q4rk235/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19600302  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, March  2, 1960 text The Kentucky Kernel, March  2, 1960 1960 2013 true xt705q4rk235 section xt705q4rk235 Cast, Directors Give Views On Ibsen Play

I think the hardest problem
Dr. Edward Foster, English In- "Ibsen calls for several live anl- confronting an actor who plays slruetor, describes the Gyntian self mals, including a horse, a cat, and
Tcer Oynt is the duality of Peer's as "a sea of desire."
.
p.
character," explained James Hurt, "Peer Oynt is a Norwegian folk I. '
T
Dr- Foster is impressed with the
who play? the title role in OuU- - hero whom Ibsen utilized as the
nol's production of "Peer Oynt."
lead character in his play." said 'ro11 Philosophy irnthe play which
eer' unknowingly, follows until
"As Prrr becomes in succession Mrs. Lolo Robinson, associate dl- the r" d- For spec ific examples, he
a Don Junn. a tycoon, and a pagan rector of Guignol.
.

-

-

sensuilist.Bl

in a

Mnnle-mlnde-

"Our production."

d

Mrs.

8

Robin- -

loved him."

'

-

attempts to make Pepr reailze nls
,rue seIf ThU ,s expressed by tne

line. I am myself; can you say as
mucn?'
The gmiiarm
of Rasa's death
Mfnf and "The Erlklng," a po- rtic song by Goethe, were compared
by Miss Robinson.
"The Erlking" relates the tale
cf a father taking his sick child
home, fearing a demon of the
night, which in reality is death. At
the end of the Journey, the child
is dead, as is Peer's mother at the

end of their ride to the palace,
"Ibsen's technique Is the same
as that used in the poem," said
Miss Robinson,
"Ibsen quoted freely from the
nible and from Shakespeare In the
play," Mrs. Robinson added,
In tne Moroccan scene and the
Arabian scene, Mrs. Robinson said
the author "was hitting at big
business, and he shows how a man
who has achieved wealth can be
made a fool by a woman."
Jay Abraham, stage manager,
said the play was a "challenge to
all connected with the technical
side of the theatre. It requires
treme coordination between tast,
sound, lighting, and crew.
Continued On Page 8
ex-w- as

gm

(A

:

f,

Trol, lo thyself be enough, , and
"To be oneself is to slay oneself."
Don Galloway, a drama major
portraying the button molder,
feels the play Is "gooJ closet drama
written, and with the editing, is
good stage drama."
Closet drama is drama written to
be read, and "Peer Gynt" is a
poetic drama as written by Ibsen,
43 scene changes, if it were uncut.
On the other hand, stage drama

attempt to 'be himself.' the aud- - son continued, "is one of those
lence realizes that, attractive as which is more rewarding for peo- lie is. Prrr i at heart a thoroughly pie connected with the production
selfish person."
itself than for the audience, al- Hurt said the whole play "must though it is a thoroughly enjoyable
lend logically to its climax in the and entertaining performance."
final srrn when Peer rralires that
John Pauli, assistant director,
all hh life, the real 'Gyntian self feels Ibsen "never intended 'Peer
r.of In his grandiose deeds, but Gynf to be produced. The original
in the simple heart of Solveig, who play would run five hours with

is written with technical problems
n mind. It is designed by the
author to be produced.
Mrs- Robinson said the Boyg. a
shapeless voice which Peer en- BoyK
countcrSi ..,s PefT.s solf

University of Kentucky
Vol. LI

rw i

,

'

'

;

9.

iVnr Faculty
Grouped around a model in the Architectural Engineering Department are the new members of its faculty. They are from left,
David f ogle, Georgetown: Charles Graves, head of the department;
Richard Shubert, Lexington; and Grady Clay, real estate editor
of the Louisville Courier-Journa- l.

About 1,000 Dead
In Moroccan Quake
American, French, Spanish, and
CASABLANCA. Morocco. March
1
(AP) Two shattering earth- Italian armed forces, and Red
quakes followed by fire and an Cross experts rushed to the aid of
Atlantic tidal wave today turned Morocco's servicemen in efforts to

the gay costal resort city of Agadir succor the survivors.
Into a muss of entombing ruins.
Rear Adm. Frank Akers. comMoroccan officials said 1.000 dead mander of the U. S. fleet air arm
were buried under the rubble and in the Mediterranean, flew to the
perhaps ftveral thousand were in- Atlantic coastal city of 40.000. which
jured.

Priest Elected
A&S President
Whayne C. Priest was elected
president of the College of Arts
and Sciences senior class at a
meeting last night.
student from
Priest, a pre-laHartford, is president of Omicron
Kappa,
national men's
Delta
leadership honorary, and was recently elected to Phi Beta Kappa.
Other nominees for president
were Lessley Kay Decker, political science major, Owensboro,
and Thomas Judy, English major,
w

Frankfort.

Judy was elected vice president
of the class.
Cynthia Beadell. topical major
from Indianapolis, Ind., and Jerry
d
student from
Shaikun, a
Louisville, were also nominated for
the otfice.
Miss L'radrll was elected secretary-tpie-me-

reasurer.

Three coeds opposed Miss Beadell for that office. They were
Sara Jean Riley, topical major,
Lexington; Sidney Crouch, a bacteriology major from Carlisle; and
Carole Martin, journalism major,
Trenton, N. J.

SUIl Activities
SI)

Room

Serial Committee

4

p.m.

123.

Student's Party

4

pm. Room

201.

WI S

4 p.m. Room 205.
Sub Topics 3 p.m. Room 205.
Dame's Club 7:30 p.m. Music
Room.
Phi Alpha Theta 3:13 pm.
Music Room.
Young Republicans Club 4 p.m.
Men's Reading Lounge.
Suptrtisrd chess games 4 p.m.

Soi l.il Room.

LEXINGTON,

MARCH 2, I960

No. 74

Clements Talks Here
In Combs9 Absence

By MIKE WENNINGER
Thursday Associate Editor
Gov. Bert Combs was unable to
attend the opening of the 12th annual Kentucky Highway Conference yesterday to speak at a
luncheon meeting in the SUB.
Former Gov. Earle C. Clements,
Kentucky state highway commissioner, took Mr. Combs' place on
the program and read the governor's previously prepared speech.
No reason was given for his absence.
Daniel V. Terrell, dean emeritus
of the College of Engineering, introduced Commissioner Clements
to the group of highway personnel
that filled the SUB Ballroom.
Before reading the governor's
speech. Mr. Clements credited
Dean Terrell with doing much to
help improve the state highway
program. He also mentioned that
Gov. Combs greatly regretted not
being able to deliver the talk in
person.
Mr. Clements then read Mr.
Combs speech, which included the
following:

in recent years had become a
popular resort for Europeans.
Akers said the situation remained extremely serious tonight. He
reported a critical shortage of fresh
water and danger of more fires
from broken gas mains.
Most survivors were driven from
their homes by the triple assault
of quakes, fire, and water and the
added element of fear.
Two U. S. naval planes flew into
the largely Arab city 2G5 miles
southwest of Casablanca with cons.
tingents of Marines and Navy
equipBulldozers and other
ment were being flown in.
An Italian air force CI 19 plane
left Milan with doctors and 3'i
The Arnold Air Society, advanctons of medicines. An Italian naval ed AFROTC honorary, initiated 15
ship was ordered to load food, pledges In ceremonies held in the
clothing, and drugs for Agadir.
SUB last Thursday.
Seniors initiated are Garnett
C. Brown, James F. Caldwell, Louis
A. Crigler, James H. Manly, Don
Art Gallery
C. Mitchum. Patrick J. O'Brien, and
The I'K Art Gallery will be Paul E. Shoemaker.
open during the Guignol proJuniors are Troy D. Christopher,
duction this week from 8 p.m. Charles R. Dick, John II. Greves,
until intermission, Prof. Richard Michael C. Hinton, George D.
Freeman announced yesterday.
Looke Jr., Garryl C. Sipple, Wilpresent exhibit is a colThe
liam R. Sprague, and Warren
lection of paintings and drawWheat.
ings by Jay Murray and Walter
Richard H. Steckler, commander
of the Arnold Air Society, conductPearce.
ed the initiation.
sea-bee-

KY., WEDNESDAY,

Air Society
Initiates
13 Pledges

"Highways are an essential
weapon in the competition between
the states for good will, for new
industry, and for tourists.
"We in Kentucky realize that our
sites for new industrial plants will
remain undeveloped unless we
have good roads on which to haul
in raw materials and haul out the
finished products.
"Kentucky has a lot to sell. To
do a better Job of selling, we must
dress up our display windows.
"Highways good highways are
definitely a part of our display
windows. They attract customers to
our wares.
"In recognition of the importance of good highways to a state's
prosperity, we are now in the midst
of the greatest road building
program in Kentucky's history.
"You are familiar with the Eastern Kentucky highway, which we
now are designing. We expect to
start construction this summer.
"The construction of more and
better highways is part of an overall program for development of
Kentucky. The state government is
pouring millions of dollars into the
undertaking.
"Kentucky is entering the most
extensive era of development and
promotion in its history.
"We intend to spend a million
dollars for an agricultural research

center at UK.
"You have read, of course, about

is the merit system for
state employees. The system will
mean less turnover in employment,
which heretofore has been costly
to the state.
"To remove roadblocks in the
way of progress, we are proposing
a limited revision of our state
constitution. It is 68 years old and
was adopted in the
days. Many of its restrictions
reform

horse-and-bug--

gy

provide obstacles to progress in thi3
age of atomic energy.
"Our program for Kentucky's development is an ambitious one. It.
is a program designed to take advantage of the ambitious possibilities of the new decade. To be
successful, it requires the cooperation of all Kentuckians."
After reading the governor's
speech, Commissioner Clements
re-mar-

represents

the
"It
thoughts of a dedicated person who
will spend the next four years trying to carry out this program for
the state you love and I love.
"While I'm with the Highway
Department, I'll be dedicated to
one thing to get the most out of
Continued On Page 3

Sheriff Says
UK May Get
3 Skeletons

the billion dollar budget now before the legislature. Virtually all
Three skeletons found on a
that money, to be spent during the mountain near Whitesburg will be
next two years, will directly or in- turned over to UK if the FBI Is
directly contribute to the develop- no longer interested, Johnny Fulton, Letcher County Sheriff, said
ment of Kentucky.
"This includes higher salaries for
our school teachers, more classrooms, better hospitals, and greater
benefits for the needy aged and
other recipients of public assistance.
"Reforms in government also
have an important role. They will
increase the efficiency of our
government service and result in
substantial savings to our citizens.
"An outstanding example of this

yesterday.
Several officials who examined
the skeletons were unable to determine if the bones are Indian or
the remains of two Letcher County women who vanished 13 years
ago.

The skeletons

were discovered

Saturday on a cliff overhang by
Carlos Holbrook. The
bones were under a heap of earth
and rock.

Organist Marchal To Give Recital Tonight
The University Musicale Series
present Andre Marchal, organist, in a recital at 8 o'clock tonight in Memorial Hall.
blind musician
The
Is a native of Paris. He studied
at the National Institute for the
Blind, where he later became a
teacher.
At 17 he was invited by Eugene
Gigout to enter his organ class at
the Paris Conservatoire.
He won the "Premier Prix" fur
ctun pitying and impx'uvLation

will

in 1913 and a special prize for Hall in London. He broadcasts Origny. Clerambault. and Titelouze
counterpoint and fugue two years frequently for the British Broad- are other items in his repertoire.
casting Corporation.
later.
Most of his recordings received the
Between the two world wars,
Marchal is noted for his inter- "Orand Prix duo Disque"
Marchal made his first visit to the pretative style in playing the organ
Besides his work in the recital
United States to give a series of music of Bach.
field and his recordings, he is
recitals in the Cleveland Museum
Blind from birth, he reads music noted also for his work as a teaof Art. He has made numerous by Braille, but he has an im- cher. He has given master classes
In England. Australia, France, and
American recital tours since that mense repertoire.
Marchal has recorded the com- the L'nited States.
time.
He took pait in the conceit, plete organ works of Franck at
His program includes pieces from
given in the presence of Her MaFrancois Couperin LeBegue. Couperin, Couperin le
jesty Queen Elizabeth, inaugurat- at La Fleche, as well as Bach's Grand, Calvieie, Gngny, Bach,
ing the organ in the Royal Festival major works. Entire volumes of Franck, Toumeinite, aud Alain.
Saint-Eustach- e,

* 2 -- THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Wednesday, March 2,

10

UK Agriculture Personnel
Participating In Meeting

UK Home Ec Grad Is Credited
With Saving Iran Babies' Lives
Dean Low, who received
her master's degree In home eco- nomics at UK In 1957, has been
credited with saving the lives of
many starving babies in Iran.
A recent bulletin of the Food
and Agriculture Organization of
the United Nations states that
Mis Low in one of her first assignments helped organize a school
feeding program In the poorest
section of Iran.
provided hot
Thia program
lunches and vitamin rapsules to
more than 34)00 children, and the
service was later extended to 7,500
children.
Food for the program was ac- quired from private and govern- mental organizations.
The young Englishwoman also
fee used her attention on the
foundlings and other children In
the public institutions. First, with
the support of the Iranian government and municipal authorities
Miss

.

and volunteer nurses, she .started
a nursery for 70 foundlings.
jiss Low said, "During the 18
month up to the time I left, we
took in 132 foundlings, all of them
left dying of starvation. In fact, two
of them did die within a few days
of being admitted. It was too late
to save them."
She formerly worked for the
United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration In Gaza, Syria, and Lebanon. Her next
assignment was In a compound
where there was a group of 40
homeless children between three
and five years old.
"These children were in such a
condition that they couldn't walk,
talk, or even crawl, and were so
w?ak and near starvation that they
wouidnteat. sne saia.
Miss Low stayed in the com
pound for three months. She said
that after a year of proper nutrition and care, the children looked

more normal, "but they were un
derslzed for theirj age because of
the lasting effects of malnutrition
in their Infant years."
The Food nd Agriculture Or- Ionization said the work done by
ai,ss kow points (he way to the
task ahead.
She studied under Dr. Abby
Marlatt. director of the UK School
of Home Economics when Dr.
Marlatt taught at Deirut College
for Women in Lebanon.
After graduation. Miss Low came
to the United States and took further studies in nutrition In Kansas
before coming to UK.

UK agriculture personnel will
meeting
participate in a two-da- y
at the UK experiment substation
in Princeton on March 2 and 3.
Persons attending from the Agriculture Extension Service are
Dr. E. J. Nesius, associate director
of the Extension Service; Alda
Hennlng. chairman of home
agents; Fred Brockman, young
family specialist; Mary Browder,
family life specialist; and Ralph
Ramsey, rural sociologist.
Family llvlnr and Job opportunities will be discussed at the lTK
experiment substation's annual

No Spank

2 Professors

.To Speak
In Chicago

Two UK professors are appearing
on the program of the 39th annual
conference of the Agricultural Education Central Region to be held
in Chicago this week.
Dr. Carsie Hammonds, head of
the Department of Agricultural Ed- Sunday ni?ht with a sermon and neat ion. discussed "Some Things to
benediction.
Consider in Improving the Farm- Each morning he will conduct inS Program" at the Tuesday
private conferences and distribute laornin- - si'"0"
Dr. Harold Rinklry, associate
Holy Communion from 8 a.m.
professor of agricultural education.
Masses will be held each day at vil! talk on "Improving Farming
7:110 a.m. and 4:1) p.m. Father I'roRr.ims Thou'i Motivation" at
will fellow the afternoon the Thursday afternoon session.
Ur. George Luster, associate promasses by a short sermon.
fessor of Hgricultural education,
Sermon and benediction will be will also attend the Tuesday-Frida- y
held ench evening at 7:30 o'clock.
conference.

ROANOKE, Va. (AP)
Carlton
Coleman, a blind veteran, says he
finds only one fault with a leader
dog furnished him by the Veterans Administration.
"I have to tie up Smokey before I can spank one of my four
children."

6-- 11

Ire-hin- d,

Frank Borries, public information director for the Agriculture
Extension Service, said approximately 500 people from 30 to 50
Western Kentucky counties would
attend the meetings.

To Bo Initialed
In Pi Mu Epsilou
Kentucky Alpha Chapter of PI
Mu Epsilon, national mathematics
honorary, will initiate eight new
members at 4 p.m. Thursday In
Room 104 of McVey Hall.
A business meeting will follow
the Initiation.
Those to be Initiated are
Marlon J. Ball. Richard A. Lleck.
Lael Klnch, Charles R. Marcus.
John A. Pfaltzgraff, Cecily Ann
Sparks, Shirley Weihe, and Diane
Yonkos.

OPrM

DAILY

USED BOOK STORE

t:M PM.

(Other Than Text)
mm Chvy Chas
NOW SHOWING
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Kuctid

DENNIS
BOOK STORE

Frank Sinatra - Lollobrigida

"Rawhide Years"

Neat 3rd

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Tony Curtis - Colleen Miller

7--

The S&tetzooA scribe4
is the Ball Point made
to write best on PAPER!

Fi.-ilie-

-

e

Name Doesn't Fit
WILLIAMSON. W. Va. (AF

The First National Bank has a
new' janitor.
His name: Jesse James Dalton.

i

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5S70J

1

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7.

IB

1

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4

NOW! 2ND BIG WEEK

YulEhynner jffTS

gGlNA

5 p.m.

Ke will open

Kentucky.

Central Kentucky's Largest

Catholic Priest To Conduct
Mission At Newman Club
The Rev. Ralph Fisher, C.S.C..
Metre Dame University, will con- at the
duct a mission March
Newman Club Chapel, 320 Rose
Lane.
After .serving as a captain in the
intelligence branch of the U. S.
Army, Father Fisher took graduate
work at Columbia University.
Queens University in Belfast,
the Sorbonne in Paris, and
the University of Berlin in Germany.
He received a degree in philosophy from Noire Dame and studied
theology for four years at Holy
Cross College, Washington, D. C.
Following his ordination, he was
to the Holy Cross
appointed
Fathers Mission Band, preaching
missions in parish churches
throughout the United States.
He is now director of vocations
fcr his order.
Father Fisher will preach at
masses on Sunday, March 6, at
0, 10, and 11 a.m., 12 noon, and

farm and home week for Western

TH3

the mission at 7:30

LOLLOSRi'GIDA

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EST

FRANCAIS . . .

Linda Christian

3f
1

Here is a piece ofaper,
Clip it out and try this
test: write on it with
an Stitiv&took and all
other ball point pens,,
and by golly you'll se
what we mean.
,

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iVtyf

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glass of white wine at a sidewalk cafe?

stroll by that long, lanky tower?
AIR FRANCE whisks you there in less than a day
A

With its fabulous,

faster jet power.

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* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Wednesday, Mau7T

2,

l0-- 3

Coeds Set Tender Trap For Leap Year Ball
ny TON I LENNOX
remains only one thing to say
npgy banks are bursting out ell gentlemen beware.
ever, and evening snacks are beThese "femme fatales" are busy
er mind a thing of the past as fe- helping Cupid sharpen his arrows.
males busy themselves with scrap- They will resort to the lowest
ing together as much ammunition forms of feminine deceit at their
as possible for this weekend.
disposal.
The farts are rlear. Leap year Is
For most females, this weekend
here, making the age-ol- d
female will climax a period of concendrire to chase and hook some de- trated effort to nab you, as they
serving male prospect eitremely launch their first
t,
open aslegal onre again.
sault titled appropriately enough
And, to the opposite sex, there "The Gold Digger's Ball."

strategy, you fsay,

you already
Here, my friends, lies the
Irony of it all. 1
Being virile specimens of manhood, you accept this challenge to
trap you. You set about to show
these "Delilahs" that you are not
the least vulnerable and sit back
to enjoy all the attention that will
be lavished upon you.
You will begin by dressing
to meet your "Waterloo;"
and your "Waterloo," once again
Your position, gentlemen, is re- appropriately enough, will dress
portedly exceedingly vulnerable.
"fit to kill."
To prevent this event from beAll will go well until sometime
coming merely a
toward the end of the evening.
slaughter, with male hearts fallHaving been wined, dined, and
ing everywhere without defense,
flowered during all this time,
lend an eye, as your weakest tendsomehow you will find that you
encies are unfolded before you.
plans for the evening are have entered into a warmhearted,
The
to entertain you as kings. This mellow, unassuming disposition.
It will slowly creep into your
head that this creature beside you
isn't such bad sort after aU.
In such a state, aided by the
dim lights and soft music, it is inevitable that you will "see the
Delta Zeta sorority elected of light,"
that this gentle, generous,
ficers for the second semester.
Publicity chairman, Maxine
Cates; scholarship chairman, Ema-J- o
Cocanougher; activities chairman, Wanda Combs; standards
know.

all-ou-

Clements Talks Here
In Comb s Absence

well-plann-

Continued From Tage 1
fvery dollar that comes into the
department," Mr. Clements added.
He invited criticism of the state
highway program, saying, "In a
democracy, it's always open season
on public officials."
Earlier yesterday, another substitute speaker talked to delegates
to the conference. E. L. Armstrong,
U. S. commissioner of public roads,
was scheduled to speak to a gen-rsession at 10:15 a.m. in Memorial Hall.
Fred B. Farrell. assistant regional engineer from the Bureau of
Public Roads, Chicago Region, took
Armstrong's place on the program
and
read
the commissioner's
sptech. "Highways and People."
The speech dealt with the history of the development of roads
and their influence on an area's
populace.
al

a. .

ly

ed

Delia Zela Elects
Semester Officers

chairman, Peggy Johnson; courtesy chairman, Betty DeVault; athletics chairman, Beth Smith.
Philanthropies, Linda Frey; art

UK Student

To Speak
To Honorary

Do bu Think for 1burself?
(DIG THIS QUIZ AND SEE IF YOU STRIKE PAY DIRT)

chairmen, Marty Keffer and Valerie Hembree.Judiciary chairman,
Linda Lictz; and alumni coordinator, Lou Snodgrass.

Oi
I

ele-gent-

unselfish female with you Isn't
The rest Is too terrible to tell.
like all the others, but exactly However, if you see any arrows
what you've been looking for all coming your way, you'd
better run.
your life.
Her hair will seem softer than
silk, her cheeks like roses, her lips
a tantalizing red, her eyes like
"limpid pools," and her figure
matched only by Venus.
Undoubtedly, yon will realize
that In attaching yourself to her,
you will be the envy of all mankind.
Frank Mithias, history graduate
student, will speak at 3:45 p.m. toYoung Republicans
day in the SUB Music Room to
Winfield Leathers, chairman members of Thi Alpha Theta, hisof the Young Republican Clubs tory honorary.
of Kentucky, will address the
He will tell of his experience editUK Young Republican Club at ing
Thomas W. Parsons' diary and
4 p.m. today in the Men's Readreminiscences. Parsons, a Kentuck-la- n,
ing Lounge of the SUB.
fought in the Mexican War
Leathers has been campaignand with the Union cavalry in the
ing for the resignation of Dewey Civil
War.
Daniel, chairman of the RepubMithias expects to receive hit
lican State Executive Committee.
Leathers feels Daniel hasn't masters degree this summer. Dr.
tory Department, is directing his
been exerting sound leadership
Thomas D. Clark, head of the
party.
in the Republican

1

a:

ill

til

j

"You can't toach an oKl dog new tricks" meana
(A) bitter teach him oIl ones; (B) it's hard to get
mental agility out of a rheumatic mind; (C) let's
face it Top likes to do thf Charleston.

For

...

When your roommate

borrows your clothes
without asking, do you
(A) charge him rent? (H)
get a roommate who
i.sn't your size? (C) hide
your best clothes?

Knock -- Out Results

On The Campus

A

...

Advertise in
The Kentucky Kernel

lie

DISPLAY AND CLASSIFIED

ADVERTISING

C

When a girl you're with
puts on lipstick in publics
do you (A) tell her to
stop? (H) refuse to bo
annoyed? (C) wonder if
the stuff's kissproof?

A

B

men and women who think for themselves usually smoke Viceroy. They've
studied the published filter facts; they
know only Viceroy has a thinking man's
filter. And Viceroy has rich, full tobacco
flavora smoking man's taste. Change

to Viceroy today!
these questions

on three out of four of
you think for yourself

(B)

1

C

If you were advising a
to pick a
filtt r cigarette, would you
say, (A) 'Tick the one
with the .strongest taste."
(IJ) "(let the facts, pal
thcu judge for yourself."
(O 'Tick the one that
claims the most."

Wm

A

B

W7

.

C

wise smoker who depends on his
own judgment, not opinions of others,
in his choice of cigarettes. That is why

It's a

7

cL

"sw

C

J

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v

r

Familiar
or
crush- proof
DO.

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The Man WhoThinks for Himself Knows
ONLY VICEROY HAS A THINKING MAN'S FILTER

SPECIAL CAMPUS RATES

C

B

f ru nd on how

and a friendly solicitor
will bo glad to serve you.

B

A

lf you checked

PUBLISHED 4 TIMES EACH WEEK

Phone University Ext. 2277

aHsS)

'

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A SMOKING MAN'S TASTE!
C

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Toliaii'o Corp.

* The Dining Denial
Saturday afternoon a group of
Negro and white demonstrators, including several University students,
staged a peaceful sitdown strike in a
downtown store in protest of segregated restaurants in Lexington.
The strike was a portion of a movement in the North and South to gain
for the Negro equal rights in public
dining places. It is being backed
unstintingly by the Congress of Racial
Equality (C.O.R.E.), and its organization is unified strongly.
Although the action of the demonstrators may be scorned, shunned, or
criticized soundly by many, the group
did not provoke anyone to violent
protestation, but merely was adamant
to the galling situation that a race
had been denied equal dining privileges.
g
This was not a
crowd; its cause and procedures for
displaying to the public its repugnance to racial prejudice was indeed
sensible. It was not even in the most
liberal sense composed of a group of
rabble rousers.
violence-instigatin-

Our society too long has kept the
Negro race in an inferior position;
our unwillingness to accept them on
an equal basis has partly leen influenced by meek civil rights laws. The Southern Regional Council has
issued the feasible recourse for dissenting restaurant owners lx)th in the
South and in the North. It says that
restaurant owners must either alxilish
lunch counters (farcical per se), alienate the Negro, or offer him equal
treatment. The third is the logical
and only solution.
Although there is a calculated risk
in any sort of demonstration, the desire for equal treatment of the races
by C.O.R.E. is well worth the chance.
There is no compromise in its fight.
The demonstrators should Ik unyielding to any agreement other than equal
treatment. Rut violence should be
avoided in every case.
We hope they keep their public
demonstrations peaceful and gain the
civil rights legislation they are

.:::.::v

AM

I

I

1

r
f

OUT TO
LAUNCH

The Time Confusion
After laboring under an archaic
time law for several years, the University was able to alleviate much
of the confusion last week when the
Court of Appeals ruled that all state
time laws were not legally valid.
The decision was met with immediate optimism here. UK President
Frank G. Dickey ordered that all
campus clocks be moved up an hour
in all cases. Students gave a thankful
"whew," faculty members extolled
the move, and administrators sighed
with relief.
We cheer the decision with appreciative applause and hope that the

state never again tries to tie down
the University with a different time
than the City of Lexington. Most UK
members will agree that one time is
hard enough to cope with.
And, despite all the release of confusion because of the time ruling,
the UK employees following out
their instructions to the letter changing the hour hands on University
clocks forgot to notice that there were
some clocks on campus operating
on Central Daylight Time.
It will prove puzzling to those who
read the clocks and then find they are
one hour ahead of time.

The Readers' Forum

basketball games, and he
couldn't possibly be a Greek, for all
the fraternity parties would be such
a hinderance to the contribution to
the furtherance of his purpose.
I think most of us recognize our
primary purpose, but there is some-tin- g
to be learned from social contacts and good entertainment occasionally. Maybe one should get out,
mill around with people, learn a few
social graces, and then one wouldn't
be so inclined to judge people who
have different interests.
Joyce Jansen
games,

Snarly Lipped
To The Editor:
Re your society editor's optimistic
appraisal of Greek Week in Friday's
Kernel:
I wonder how much of the meaningless, mediocre week she participated in or attended.
It couldn't have been much.
A Snarly LirrED One

Learn Social Graces
To The Editor:
Mr. Waitman, in his letter to the
editor (Readers' Forum, Feb. 25)
made the statement referring to football players that "one with intellect
would not be there in the first place."
According to his copied definition of
a university, one should be nowhere
but studying the higher branches of
learning. It is natural to presume that
Mr. Waitman follows his own philosophy and is a four pointer. Of
course, he never goes to football

Hhhi--

.

W.

CHAPMAH

Mechanical Mathematicians
Or, Off On

Kernels
"The last audience in America to
which I would make a serious address
would be a reunion of college graduates. In such reunions men honoring ancient shrines of learning with
one accord breathe one prayer: 'Make
me a sophomore just for tonight.' And
few prayers are more unfailingly answered." NOKMAN THOMAS.

University of Kentucky

Entered at the Post Office at Lrxinitton, Kentucky as second class mutter under the Act of March 3, 1879.
published lour tune a week dm inn the regular u hool year eicept holiday! and exam.
SIX DOLLARS A SCHOOL YEAH

Bill Neikihk, Editor

Anderson, Managing Editor
Stewart IIedcer, Sports Editor
Paul Zimmerman and Cakole Martin, Aisistatit Managing Editors
Dick Vahe and John Mitchell, Photographers
Alice Akin, Society Editor
Coldearb and Paul Dykes, Advertising Managers
Stuart
Beverly Cakiavell, Circulation
Terry Ashley, Business Manager
Bob JIerndon, Hank Chapman, and Skip Taylor, Cartoonists
Bob

Staff Writers: George Smith. Iietigie Cordis, Logan Bailey, Bobbie Mason, Robert Orndorff. Jean
Schwartz, ChrUta r'lnley. Herb Steeley, Newton Spencer, Richard Hedlund, Michele Keyring, Sue
McCauley, John Kitiwaler, Scotti Helt, Lavon licnnett, Merritt Deiti, Hob Fruser. Norris Johnson,
Konald McKe, Mary Lucille Miller, James Lawrence Perkins, Jun Phillips, Neila Sharron Scott,
Allen Travis, Edward V. Van Hook, Eleanor liurkhard. Beverly Card well, and Tom Leiinos.

WEDNESDAY'S NEWS STAFF
Rex Bailey, Associate

A

Tantent

liy IlOlilllE MASON
I have just discovered in the course

preclassification
that I have
changed my major again this semester.

of

Actually, it is just a