xt705q4rms9s https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt705q4rms9s/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19640407  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, April  7, 1964 text The Kentucky Kernel, April  7, 1964 1964 2015 true xt705q4rms9s section xt705q4rms9s v

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LEXINGTON,

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Two University Historians

Receive Fulbright Awards
Two University historians
have received Fulbright
awards, permitting them to
study in Europe during the
1904-6academic year.

Delta Psi Kappa

Recent Initiates of Delta Psi Kappa, physical eduration honorary for
women., are, from the left, Lou Adams, Judy Meacham, and Susan
Burrle.

Helen King Named
UK's Top Alumna
Miss Helen G. King, director of University alumni affairs,
will be honored as the outstanding alumna of the year by
Theta Sigma Phi at the annual Matrix dinner on April 15.
The organization Is an hon
orary fraternity for women in
journalism.
A native of Lexington, Miss
King was honored by the UK
Alumni Association which named
its newly constructed - alumni
headquarters the Helen O. King
Alumni House at the group's annual meeting last June.
Before becoming director of
alumni affairs in 194G, Miss King
held several positions in the
newspaper, public relations, and
advertising fields.
Among these were advertising
feature writer for The Lexington
Herald, fashion writer for a major Cincinnati store, state editor
of The Lexington Herald, and
assistant director of the UK department of public relations from
1929 to 1946.

has served as a newspaper
radio columnist.

and

She has had poems published
in several anthologies, as well as
in a privately published collection of her poetry.
Miss King formerly served as
one- of the four members of the
executive committee of the American Alumni Council and was
chairman of District 3 of the
council for two years.

DR. STANLEY ZYZNIEWSKY

DR. CLEMENT ETON

influence this development had
Russian
attitudes and
upon
thought.
Dr. Zyzniewski also plans to
conduct research In Poland during the summer of 1965. He was a
at Warsaw
visiting researcher
University In 1958 under a Ford
cultural
Foundation
exchange
program. In 1962 he lectured on
the Soviet alliance system to
American and foreign naval officers at the U. S. Naval War

College, Newport, R. I.
At Bologna, Dr. Eaton
will
lecture to students from several
European
countries,
including
Germany, Italy, Austria and Denmark.
The 1964-6- 5
award is Dr.
Eaton's third Fulbright professor
ship. The earlier ones sent him to
the University of Manchester in
England and the University of
Innsbruck in Austria. ITe recently
accepted an Invitation to serve as
Pitt Professor of American history at England's
Cambridge
University during the 1968-6- 9 academic year.
Dr. Eaton was president of the
Southern
Historical Association
in 1961 and has served on the
council of the American Historical Association.
The UK historian is the author
of several books that have won
wide critical acclaim. They include "Freedom of Thought in
the Old South," "A History of
the Old South," "A History of
the Southern Confederacy,"
"Henry
Clay and the Art of
American
Politics," and "The
Growth of Southern Civilization

Dividend Payments
Authorized By UK
Dividend payments totaling $7,000 have been authorized
to members of the University T.I.A.A. Major Medical Insurance Plan, Frof. Homer C. Lewis, chairman of the University Insurance Committee, announced.
This dividend amounts to apof the insurance to the members
of

preproximately 14'i percent
miums paid by members during
the calendar year 1963. The distribution will be made April 15th
to faculty and staff in proportion to the total premiums paid
by the individual members during the year.

Miss King also has published
rous articles in magazines
Sessional publications, and

SC Meeting

The Stude.it Congress will
meet toi'ight at 7 p.m. in the
Student Center Theatre. Nominations for officers for next
year will be made tonight. The
reports on the new constitution
will also be discussed.

Dr. Stanley J. Zyzniewsky, associate professor of history, will
do research work In the Slavic
Library at the University of Helsinki In Finland, while Dr. W.
Clement Eaton, professor of history, will lecture on American
social and intellectual history at
the Center of American Studies
In Bologna, Italy.
Dr. Zyzniewski, a specialist In
modern European and Russian
history, will chart Russian reactions to the constitutional-governmebeginnings that were
made in the last decade (1815-2of the reign of Czar Alexander I.
During this period. Dr. Zynlew-sexplains Russians were exposoccured to an unprecedented
rence. Two parts of the empire
the Duchy of Finland and the
Congress Kingdom of Poland-w- ere
By
granted constitutions.
studying Russian newspapers and
periodicals of the period, the I'K
historian hopes to determine what

HELEN G. KING

The current dividend Is the
second one paid to members of
the insurance plan since its Inception in August 1901. The first
such dividend resulted in a distribution of $15,491.71 for the
seventeen months from August
1961 through
1962.
December
These dividends are the result of
favorable claims experience and
represent a reduction in the cost

participating in the plan.
The Insurance Committee Is
currently conducting an "open
enrollment" and an "open eligibility'' period which will end April
20. For persons in presently eligible groups It la only necessary to
sign an enrollment card in order
for the insurance coverage to become effective June 1.
For persons who are not in
currently eligible groups, it will
be necessary that a minimum of
75 percent
of all the persons
within any newly defined occupational grouping or academic
rank apply for enrollment in
order for that particular group
to become eligible.

Cwens
At the Initiation Banquet for
all Cwens, the new officers were
announced. They are president,
Bonnie Johnson;
Ann Breeding; secretary, Judy
Price; treasurer, B. J. C'onsi-dinLiz
ritual chairman,
Johnson; special projects chairman. Sue Ellen Dorton; Tid
editor, Gay Gish.

Nation Pays Tribute To 'Old Soldier
-

's
The following is an excerpt from General Douglas
historic address before the cadets of the United
States Military Academy on May 12, 19G2, in acceptance of
the Sylvanus Thayer Award:

". . . the soldier above all other people prays for peace, for he
must suffer and bear the deepest wounds and scars of war. But
always in our ears ring the ominous words of Plato, that wisest of all
philosophers; 'Only the dead have seen the end of war.'
"The shadows are lengthening for me. The twilight is here. My
days of old have vanished tone and tint. They have gone glimmering through the dreams of things that were. Their memory is one of
wondrous beauty, watered by tears and coaxed and caressed by the
miles of yesterday. I listen vainly, but with thirsty ear, for the
witching melody of faint bugles blowing reveille, of far drums beating the long roll.
"In my dreams I hear again the crash of guns, the rattle of
musketry, the strange, mournful mutter of the battlefield. But In
the evening of my memory always I come back to West Point. Always
Duty, honor, country.
there echoes and
"Today marks my final roll call with you. But I want you to
I cross the river, my lust conscious thoughts will
know that when
be of the corps, and the crops, and the corps.
"I bid you farewell."

NEW YORK (AP)
The
d
roar of distant
guns paid homage yesterday
to the memory of General of
the Army Douglas MacAr-thu- r,
echoing across two main
scenes of his long life, the
U.S. Military Academy and
New York City, his last home.

At both places,
salutes
were fired promptly at noon.
Across the nation, on the high
seas, and at all American installations
around
the world,
f.
flugs were lowered to
They will remain so, by order of
President Johnson, until after
the funeral services for
in Norfolk, Va., next
Saturday.
During the week of mourning,
his body will luy iu repose in

New York, the Capitol Rotunda
in Washington, and in the
Memorial Rotunda
in
Norfolk.
He himself chose Norfolk as
his last resting place because his
mother, the former Mary Pick-ne- y
Hardy, was born, reared and
married there.
MacArthur's body was brought
to New York from Washington
by motorcade Sunday night. He
died in Walter Reed Hospital at
the age of 84.
Tomorrow, with 2,000 cadets
lining the t! mile route, the
general's body will be taken from
the armory to Pennsylvania Railway Station for the rUrt of the
trip to Washington.
MacArthur's personal flag and
the flag of the Seventh Regiment of the "Rainbow Division"
will be carried in the procession.
Behind an army caisson will

come a riderless horse.
Blanchard said Pfc. James P.
Stimpson, of Munford, Tenn., will
lead the horse. JStimpson performed the same duty in the
funeral cortege for the late President Kennedy.
Kennedy's body was the last
to lie in state In the Capitol
Rotunda, to which MacArthur's
remains will be taken Wednesday.
MacArthur's cortege will pass
near a point where a bronza
statute, showing American infantrymen in action, commemorates the men MacArthur led in
World War I.
Today, a famed "doughboy,"
spoke from a hospital in Pall
Mall. Tenn.
Sgt. Alvln York,
World War I Medal of Honor
winner.
MacArthur, he said, "was an
Continued on rage S

* 2

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Tuesday, April

7,

196--

Alarmed At Lack Of Support
For Humanities, Oswald Says
University President John
W. Oswald said that he is
alarmed at the lack of financial support being given to
the humanities in proportion
to that of the sciences.
"As a scientist," he said, "I
certainly recognize the contributions of science to liberal education as well as the practical application of Its results to the
national welfare.
"But I also recognize the value
of the humanities as liberating
forces; I recognize the part the
humanities play In the Ideological struggle of our day.
"It Is not difficult to see,
howevrr, that the current imbalance may eventually lead to a
of the humanities,
both In the scholarly world and
Dr. Osia the market-place,- "
wald, a plant pathologist, told
' delegate
to the 17th annual
meeting of the Southern Humanities Conference last Friday.
"Large research grants and
higher salaries are already attracting a disproportionate number of our good minds Into the
sciences," he continued.

Ten Compete
Tonight In
Crum Contest
Ten University students will
compete in the Crum Extemporaneous Speaking Contest which is set for 7:30 p.m.
today in the Lab Theater of
the Fine Arts liuilding.
The contest was established by
Literary Society
in 1902 with a gift from George
W. Crum of Louisville. It is
named In memory of Floyd Crum,
who died in 1888 while a student
at the University and a member
of the Patterson Literary Society.
Trophies will be awarded to
first, second, and third place winners. Men who will speak in the
1964 contest are: Terry Anderson, a sophomore in the College
of Arts and Sciences; Howell
Brady, A&S sophomore; William
K. Brown, Engineering Junior;
Arthur Henderson, sophomore
Richard Hite,
in Kngineerlng:
sophomore in Commerce; Michael Staed, A&S sophomore;
John Patton, A&S sophomore;
David Sullivan, freshman in Education; Curtis Quindry, junior
In Commerce; and Ali Yazdi, a
Junior in Engineering.
The following men will serve
as judges: P. W. Whiteside, Professor of Law; Richard Vimont,
Lexington attorney; and Elmer
Purdom. Principal of Henry Clay
Hiuh School.
The public Is invited to attend
the contest.

the Patterson

The president said he agrees
with Howard Mumford Jones,
who wrote In his book, "One
Great Society," that "the disparity seems to be vastly disproportionate to enduring values and
national needs It is not good for
the humanities, for the social
sciences, for science, or for the
nation."
Dr. Oswald said he also agrees
with a suggestion made by Dr.
Thomas B. Etroup, UK professor
of English and chairman of the
conference, that the group, rep19
learned societies,
resenting
should draft and publish a stateof Its belief about the
ment
place of humanities in Southern
education.
"Such a statement," he said,
"would be of value to faculties
and administrators as we reshape
our curricula to meet the needs
of our time and especially as we
attempt to meet the needs of the
emerging South not merely an
economically secure South, but a
South capable of making its
to letters
proper contributions
and scholarship In the arts, litand religion."
erature, philosophy,
Also speaking at the conference was Dr. Joseph A. Bryant
of the University of North Carolina, who told the delegates
that literature, like the other
arts, preserves an Image of man
at his most God-likLose sight of that image. Dr.
Bryant said, "and euthanasia,
of the unfit, and
sterilization
selective breeding of human bebecome reasonable and propings
er practices.
"If man has been created In
the image of his creator, then
the distincltve thing about man
he said, adis his creativity,"
ding that a good literature prostudents to see
fessor requires his
themselves as "participants In
the poetic process."
"You and I," he told his audience, "should be able to grasp
an even richer collection of Insights from the works of Shakehimspeare than Shakespeare
self was able to.
"If we cannot, the works of
Shakespeare are for us and for
our successors dead, and the
world that stretches ahead of us
new
is indeed the frightening
world that some of our better
satirists have warned us of."
Dr. J. W. Patterson, UK associate professor of speech, told
the group that the art of rhetoric can be saved as a humane
study.
He said that teachers of rhetoric, or speech, which he de- -

scribed as "a study of the whole
process of relating our thoughts
to others in order to Influence
their behavior in some way,"
must do two things to avoid compromise.
"First, we must hold to the
concept of the true orator being a good man skilled in speaking, for the rhetorician is forever
calling on us to make choices
Involving values. He must, therefore, understand the relationship
of his art to ethics and politics.
"Secondly, we must not leave
to the commercial-typ- e
speech
classes and the toastmasters
clubs the Job of teaching people
how to persuade others to adopt
right attitudes and act in response to them.
"The awful result will continue to be a nation ef citizens
who cannot speak effectively, and
even worse, a nation of citizens
who do not speak ethically," he
concluded.

AT

1:30,

f .OQ.

Dr. Jokl is one of 12 winners
of national physical fitness Leadership awards instituted by the
United States Junior Chamber of
Commerce and linked with the
President's Council on Physical
Fitness.
Besides conferring with the
President on the country's physical fitness program. Dr. Jokl and
the other award recipients will
tour the White House, lunch at
the Pentagon and attend a buffet
honoring baseball great, Etan
Musial.
The l"K professor was nominated for the national award after receiving physical fitness leadership awards from the Lexington and Kentucky Jaycee organizations.
At the request of state officials, he has undertaken the most
comprehensive scientific study of
physical fitness ever attempted
in the United States.

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Clvii is back! It's
ELVIS PRESLEY in

Served weekdays 11 J.m. to 2 p.m.

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formerly
resident of South Africa, Dr.
Jokl has been at UK for over a
decade. In addition to his faculty
duties here, he has initiated activity programs for children and
adults in Lexington in cooperation with civic, fraternal and religious organizations.
He is a consultant to the U. S.
Olympic Committee and has been
in charge of research surveys
conducted at the Olympic Committee and has been in charge of
research surveys conducted at the
Games
in Helsinki
Olympic
(1952), and Rome (1960). He will
conduct similar studies in Tokyo
this year.

TUESDAY ONLY

PLUS

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Marketing

David Keil, vice president and
account executive of Young and
Rubican Advertising Agency will
talk at 7:30 p.m. today to the
American Marketing Association.
Mr. Hell's topic will be "Marketing Is a State of Mind" and will
be given in Room 245 of the
Student Center.
M.

Dr. Ernst Jokl, sports medicine specialist and physical
education professor at the University will go to Washington
tomorrow to accept a national honor with President Lyndon
B. Johnson.
German-bor- n
a
and

!FC MEETING

STRAND

George

Jokl To Receive
Award From LBJ

The Interfraternity Council
will meet at 6:30 p.m. today
In Room 117 of the Student
Center. Committee reports will
be given.

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* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Tuesday, April

Kernel Women's Page
Engagements

--

Carolina Rigshy, a senior Chemistry major at Transylvania College from Ashland and a member of Delta Delta Delta, to
Glenn Graber, a senior Topical
Major from Ashland.
Lou Ann Wilson, a freshman
lit Georgetown
College from
Fouth Fort Mitchell, to Mitchell
a freshman
commerce
iaJor from Covington.
Marsha Wilson, a Junior elementary education major from
Dayton, Ohio, to Jim Grade, a
d
senior
major from Nashville, Tenn.
Carolyn Moore, freshman home
economics major from Lexington,
to Wayne Wells, a tophomore
civil engineering major from

frank,

TRUSTEES
Full Board
Meets Today
The I'niversity Board of Trustees will meet at 10 a.m. today
in Room 214 of the Student Center.
on the tentative
Included
agenda are the following action
Items: President's recommendations. General Outline of 1964-6- 5
Internal Budget, Audit Reports,
and approval of bond and loan
agreements.
There will be a special report
from the committee to study the
retirement system.
Discussion items include a preliminary report on parking facilities. Inaugural plans, and Centennial plans.
Reports from special committees will include finance, real
relaestate, and faculty-boar- d
tions.

Edited ly
Nancy Longhridge

Discussion Groups
The
discussion groups will begin at 6:30
tomorrow. This Is a first of
p.m.,
the results of Greek Week. Three
sororities and three fraternities
will participate.
Cultural programs will be sponsored by Delta Tau Delta and
Delta
Zeta. Logan Gray, the
Bluegrass Field Airport Manager
be guest speaker at the Drlt
will
house. The Delta Zeta's will have
John Hill of the architectural
department to speak.
Alpha XI Delta and Alpha Tau
Omega will have discussion sessions on campus problems. Topics
to be discussed are Students' responsibilities when they come to
UK including academic develop
ment and development of citizenship and loyalty; the equal opportunities of all students when
they enter the University and the
decision each has to make as to
whether or not they take advantage of the opportunities, the
responsibility of campus organizations to the student body as a
whole; uniting the student body
through the Student Center; and
who are the major participants
in our campus religious organizations.
Keith Hagen and Sandy Brock
are group leaders at the Alpha
Xi house; Clyde Richardson will
lead the discussion at the ATO
house.
and Mrs.
Dr. Jane Sears
Richard Crutcher will debate the
"Professional vs Non- - protopic,
in Today's
Women
fessional
World" at the Zeta Tau Alpha
house. Jeanne Powell Is the student discussion leader.
Lawrence Coleman, will be the
guest of the Kappa Sigma's to
discuss the effect of urban planning in regard to campus planning. Howell Brady is the student discussion leader.

Photo Scries On Display
In Journalism Building
A series of photographs, taken
by Eldon Phillips, senior Journalism major, is presently on exhibit in the Journalism Building.
The exhibit includes spot news
pictures, feature pictures, and
portraits. Also included is a picof the
ture named
"picture
month" by the Scripps-Howar- d
newspaper chain, which chooses
winner each month from
used by its 18 newspapers.
According to Phillips, "a picture of Cotton Nash in action
game
in the Kentucky-Vanderbi- lt
has drawn the most attention
from viewers."
Phillips started his photography career six years ago, on
the staff of his high school weekly newspaper.
He has worked as staff pho

Oi

Student Tour

for the Lexington
tographer
Herald while attending the Uniand worked last summer
versity,
for the Kentucky
Star In Covington.
While in school, he covers the
Lexington area photographically
for the Covington paper.
Phillips, a resident of Lexington, recently exhibited six pictures in the Kentucky Professional Photographers Convention,
the maximum number of entries
accepted.

....

'

Complttt ffghlMt-in- f.
II CountriM
Mrfala with
All firft Clan
Bath, Maali, Tip Tcanarara, Hotal
Handling, Partial.
laggaga
Ltnington
Transportation
Tour Cuida.

Tun,

'"

All

ESCORTED

Bernard Gold traded his fleet
of New York taxicabs for a fleet
of sewing machines 25 years ago.
Now Nardis of Dallas, his Arm,
is a successful high fashion institution which strives for distinctive colors and fabrics, as well
as style.
By contrast Jack Miller does a
$7 million a year business as Lois
Young, Inc. featuring
styles such as the shirt waist
at low prices. "At those prices
you can't aim for fashion," he
says.
Buyers normally complete
breakfast by 6:30 a.m. daily,
evaluate and then spend the day
salesrooms. Dress
canvassing
manufacturers
pay a $25 fee to
a dress before the assembled
put
buyers for 30 seconds.
That brief display can make or
break a style.

J 4,

$100

DUE NOW

Intormation

WILCO TRAVEL
AGENCY
504 Euclid at
Woodland

Laxlngton

April
April
April
April
April
April
April
April

April
April
April
April
April
April
April
April
April

HALE'S PHARMACY
Rexall

915

COSMETICS

.

Parking in Rear

Limestone

S.

TOILETRIES

MEN'S

PRESCRIPTIONS
FOUNTAIN

Across from UK College of Medicine

Pin-Mat-

(
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presents

...

Cosmorama
see:

exotic dances
songs
international acts

1964

For

Call

OF

April
April
April

i.e

f

"

Cosmopolitan Club

Complete Price $960
DEPOSIT

April
April

Jenny Lair, a sophomore English major from Cynthiana, and
a member of Chi Omega, to Sam
McDonald, a Junior English major from Louisville, and a member
of Pi Kappa Phi.
Beth Lubin, a freshman recreation major from Silver Spring,
Md., to David Phillips, a sophomore drama major from Bowling
Green and a member of Phi Kappa Tau.

f ROM IEXINGTON

MAY

Interfraternity Council

April

DALLAS, Texas
styles of the Sourhwest that survived fashion market tests may
be in your wardrobe next year.
The Dallas Market (Jan.
third largest in the nation,
is the sampling ground because
it is ahead of the East and West
coast markets by a few weeks.
"If a dress is a dud here," one
salesman says, "you can be sure
it won't show up on the coast."
More than 2.000 manufacturers
and some 7,000 lines of women's
summerweight casual apparel are
a part of this market's success
story.
Among the success stories behind the success- story is Elsie
Frankfurt, an attractive blonde
who looked at her pregnant sister
and said, "Honey, you look like
a beachball in an unmade bed."
She thereafter, parlayed $500
into a $3 million a year Pageboy
business with
Maternltyyear
clothes ranging from skiwear to
ball gowns for the active mother-to-b- e.

ADPI

Mother's Club benefit bridge 7:30 p.m. chapter house.
6:30 p.m. Room 117 of the Student
Center Committee reports.
Christian Science Orgaization 6:30 Room 109 Student Center
Lexington Singers 8 p.m. Memorial Hall
Christian Student Fellowship election of officers.
7
I.erture, Dr. Arthur K. Moore, Distinguished Professor of
the Year, College of Arts and Sciences, Guignol Theatr,
8 p. m.
8
AFROTC sponsors Jam Session
p.m. Buell Armory.
9 English Department Lecture, G. B. Harrison, Guignol The
atre, 8 p.m.
9 Young Democrats rlertion of officers 7 p.m. Student Crtner.
Dnyanilian Dance Group 8:15 p.m. Memorial Coliseum
10 TGIF
10
Research Conference, Chemistry-Physic- s
Building
Cancer Teaching Lecture Scries, Medical Science Bldg.,
8:30 p.m.
Spinclletop Hall Dance, 9 to 1
10
Cosmorama, 7:30 p.m., Memorial Hall
Lambda Chi Pushrart Derby dance
1
Central Kentucky Faculty Conference, Student Center
11
AFROTC Honors Day Parade, 8 a.m.
Pushrart Derby
Army-Ai- r
Force Military Ball, 8 p.m.
12
Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra 3 p.m.
13
Musicale, Norman Chapman, Pianist, Memorial Hall, 8 p.m.
13
Concert, Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra, Memorial Coliseum, 8:15 p.m.
15 Theta Sig dinner
15 MusiraJ I K Choristers, Memorial Hall, 8 p.m.
English Department Movie. "Hamlet," Laboratory Theatre,
4 and 7:30 p.m.
Art Gallery Talk and Reception for Carl Holly, Fine Arts
Bldg., 7:30 p.m.
16 Kernel Dinner
16 Audubon Film, "Kiwi Commonwealth,"
Memorial Hall,
7:30 p.m.
17
LKD
18 LKD
President's Review, 8 a.m.
24 Old South
25 Old South
Delt Formal
Army ROTC Honors Prade Day, 8 a.m.
25 Spindletop Hull Dance, Spring Formal, 9 to 1
28 Classes end at noon
Inauguration of President Oswald 2 p.m.
26 Musicale, Men and Women's Glee Hubs, Memorial Hall,
3:30 p.m.
7

the

FOR

YOUNG ADULTS
INCLUDES

April

Styles

EUROPE
THREE WEEK TOUR

Campus Calendar

Colorful

In Southwest

7, 1961- -3

$i

April 10

Kennedy's
Shackleton's
Da wo ha res

7:30
Memorial Hall

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Gee, don't- track shoes make
funny designs on a forehead . .
-

It's alarming how tome people can't wait
patiently in line to buy tickets. We hope
you've gotten yours olready. Most everyone has. If not, better get over to Kennedy's
or Graves, Cox quickly. But watch, the guy
behind you.
He'll walk all over you.

P, P and M
$2.00

April

18

LKD

Sponsored

* 7TTTTRMAN ON CAMPUS

State Politics
And Education
Governors and gubernatorial

can-

didatesDemocratic and Republican
have avowed for 30 years to remove
the University Board of Trustees from
political influence. And for 30 years
nothing has been done.
Gov. Edward T. Breathitt approved in his campaign the plea of
former President Frank G. Dickey
that the school "be removed from the
realm of petty politics."
Dr. Dickey objected to four state
provisions concerning the board (and
consequently the University) and the
question of Frankfort's potential, if
not always practiced, political control of UK.
By state law, the governor is chairman of the Board of Trustees. As
such, he can fill all unusual vacancies
and choose alumni representatives
from a list submitted by the alumni.
Two members of the governor's adthe Superintendent of
ministration
Public Instruction and the Commissioner of Agriculture
automatically
members of the board.
are
Law also requires the board to
lia-an unusual number of trustees
from farming areas and geographical
districts. Dr. Dickey felt that this
provision was a ghost of the University's 19th century ancestor, the Agricultural and Mechanical College.
The fourth objectionable provision
would require an amendment to the
constitution, Article 93, which decrees
that no state officer may be selected
or appointed for a term of more than

four years. Because board members
are state officers, a governor can appoint a majority of the trustees, thus
influencing board actions even after
his term is expired and neither he nor
his officials have voting status on the
board.
Dr. Dickey preferred for the governor to remain as chairman with no
vote. He wanted the state laws
changed to remove administration officials from the board and a constitutional amendment so that trustees'
terms could be staggered and lengthened to seven years. This would make
it impossible for a governor to appoint a majority of the board members, thereby releasing the University
from the sphere of direct politics.
In addition, the former president
called for the repeal of the laws providing for board members from agricultural areas and geographical districts, allowing the governor to select
the best qualified men to serve, regardless of their residences or their
professions.
In light of Gov. Breathitt's proclaimed agreement with Dr. Dickey's
recommendations, a little more than
12 months ago, the Kernel feels that
lie should make good his promises and
strive to free the University from
Frankfort's political reins.
UK, as a
institution,
has obligations to the entire state,
and not merely to a governor and his
administration.

Denial Of Basic Rights
In the light of two recent events
find ourselves forced to speak up
for civil rights. Pressure groups are
obviously trying to deny to fellow
Americans the basic rights of free
speech and peaceful assembly.
In one case, violence erupted when

ve

Letters To Editor
In Error
To The Editor:
Although Mr. Rosenthal is generally a good reporter, he did not, I
think, get my words down correctly
when he quoted me as having remarked of Mr. Ciardi: "Ciardi is very
elegant, however, he speaks with intelligence about subjects that he
knows nothing." Mr. Ciardi does know
something about college life; he even
knows something about poetry and
the humanities in general.
What I tried to make clear in my
statement to Mr. Rosenthal was my
feeling that Mr. Ciardi would only
cliches
palm off smoothly-fashione- d
when he spoke on campus.
Actually, I suppose I should have
suggested to Mr. Rosenthal that students, particularly members of the
Student Congress, would be wise to
attend closely to Mr. Ciardi's polished
drivel. For, as an accomplished confidence man, Mr. Ciardi is very, very
good. And, who knows, perhaps he is
to be commended for his skill in soothing and bemusing his victims.

Robfrt

L.

White

Assistant Professor
Department of English

a group blinded by prejudice picketed outside an auditorium in which
a speaker was advocating views repulsive to the group. In another case,
a group of persons was trying to restrict the right of a group to assemble.
These liberty-denyin- g
groups mentioned are not the Ku KIux Klan, the
Citizens' Council or another conservative Southern group they are "civil
rights" groups at Northern universities.
Civil rights supporters at the University of Minnesota protested the
appearance of Alabama Gov. Wallace
on the campus, and one of them attacked a
picket, according to the college paper. It seems to
us that if the attacker was really interested in civil rights, he would have
avoided attending the speech and not
interfered with those who agree with
Wallace.
At the University of Kansas a
group called the Civil Rights Coordinating Committee picketed a fraternity
house to protest a discriminatory
clause in the national fraternity's constitution. The committee's view on
civil rights must not include the right
to assemble with those you want to
and to not assemble with those you
might not want to.
In principle, we have no complaint about civil rights, but we become fearful when fanatical support'
ers try to destroy what they say they
are trying to establish. Extension of
civil rights to one group should not
also include the restriction of those
same rights to a second group.
From The Daily Reveille

The Kentucky Kernel
The Smith's Outstanding College Daily
University of Kentucky
March 8,
filtered at trie port office it Leifnirtnn, Kentucky i teoond clan matter nnder the Apt of and euma. 1879.
Publihed four time, a week during the regular nhool year except riunna holiday
Subscription ratca: 7 a achool year; 10 centa a copy lrora lilei

Sue Endicott, Editor in Chief
Cam. Modech, Campui Editor
David Hawpe, Managing Editor

Red Showdown
Premier Nikita Khrushchev will
kick off his campaign in order to get
support in his ideological dispute with
Red China next month when the
world Communist leaders will meet in
Moscow to celebrate his 70th birthday anniversary.
According to reported sources in
Budapest, a decision whether to call
a world Communist meeting to j.'dge
the dispute between the two major
states may come.
"If