xt708k74v825 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt708k74v825/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19420116  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, January 16, 1942 text The Kentucky Kernel, January 16, 1942 1942 2013 true xt708k74v825 section xt708k74v825 The Kentucky ECernel

ON PAGE THREE
Defense Courses
For Townspeopls

ON PAGE TWO
'Hooey Pollui' Returns
After Short Vacation

UNIVERSITY OP KENTUCKY

VOLUME XXXII

LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY,

Z2iS

Net Cats To Meet
Loop Leading Vols Tomorrow
--

Staker, Ken England.

JIMMY BROWN
Kernel Sports Writer
Kentucky and Tennessee are at
it again. The Souths two bitterest
hardwood rivals clash tomorrow
night at Knoxville in a game which
not only headlines the conference
card but will also grab a major
lortion of the nation's hoop spotlight.
The Cats, who have only a
loss to Ohio marring an otherwise perfect record, will be seeking
their initial conference triumph of
the season when they collide with
the Vols, who likewise have popped
to Duke.
one contest, a
The largest crowd of the Vol's
campaign probably breaking all attendance records, is expected to be
at 8 p.m
on hand for the tip-o- ff
in Alumni Memorial auditorium in
Knoxville.
Rupp named the same 14 men
who have made ail previous trips
this season to make the Southern
jaunt, which, besides the Tennes- see game, includes games with
Georgia and Georgia Tech. The
team will leave Union station at
8:25 tonight.
The squad will comprise forwards
By

.

Vj

V

-

two-poi- nt

er

Rl'PP . . .
will brave Tennessee's heck- ;; Ktwxvtl,e fomonow

KENTUCKY'S
.

.

Adain Back,

and Bruce Boehler.
After the most strenuous week of
practice since the current net season
began, the Ruppmen will enter Saturday night's battle with only one
drawback as far as physical fitness
is concerned. But it will be a handicap that may have plenty of signiJim King, whose ability to play
would mean plenty to the Cats, is
suffering from a' sprained ankle,
and it is doubtful if he will see
much action. He will make the trip,
however.
This will leave Mel Brewer with
the herculean task of stopping Tennessee's sensatiinal sophomore center, Dick Mehen. Mehen is the Vols
leading scorer, having a total Of
47 field goals for the season. Whatever relief "Brew" gets will come
from Ed Lander, who did a good
job while replacing Brewer in the
Xavier fracas.
The Ruppmen will be after revenge and a large measure of it
when they invade Coach Johnny
Mauer's camp. Early last season the
2
by the
Cats were trounced
Vols when they visited Knoxville,
and in the conference tourney finals
last .year at Louisville, the Volun- teers copped a 3 decision for the
(Continued on Page Four
32-2-

Ermal Allen. Vince Splane, Milt
Ticco. Waller White, Frank J2tscorn,
and Lloyd Ramsey; centers Mel
Brewer, Ed Lander, and Jim King;
and guards Marvin Akers, Carl

36-3-

College Man Should Advance
In Arm) , Colonel Paschal Says
Collegian Has
Better Chance,
Military Head Adds
By BETTY JANE

Dr. J. S. Chambers, director of
the dispensary, had pointed out
the dangers of improper operation of open gas heaters, and
warns students never to leave
a stove burning while they sleep.
The LSU students were found
dead in their room. In which a
gas stove had been left lighted.
Three similar deaths have occurred In Lexington in recent

ficance.

V

15 months as battalion commander
with the 30th Infantry, 3rd division.
He engaged in the Champagne-e,
arise defense, and the
St. Mihiel, and
offensives. He was
decorated at the close of the war
with the Distinguished Service cross,
the French Legion of Honor medal,
the French Croix de Guerre, the
Italian war cross and the Purple
Heart. The latter, he explained,
was first presented by George Wash
ington to soldiers in his Continental armf. Obsolete for many
years, the use of the medal was
revived during the war.
WAS INFANTRY INSTRUCTOR
The new department head was an
instructor in the infantry school
at Ft. Benning, Ga., for four years
before going to Ft. Sam Houston,
and was also on the general staff
of the War department for four
years.
was stationed
Colonel Paschal
with the Memphis high school
ROTC from 1919 to 1920. He was
a student at the infantry school
at Ft. Benning and at the Army war
college, from which he graduated
in 1929.
was stationed at
The Color-"Panama for two years, previous to

weeks.

SECOND FORUM

SET FOR TODAY
The second of the series of war
events forums sponsored by Dean
Sarah B. Holmes' Women in Defense committee will be held at 4
p. m. today In the Music room of
the Union building, with Dr. J. B.
Shannon, acting head of the political science department, directing
the discussion.
Dr. J. Huntley Dupre, professor of
history, who led the forum last
week, will be a member of the
panel. Newcomers to the program
will be Dr. Niel Plummer, head
of the. journalism department and
John Ed Pearce, Journalism senior.
The weekly forums, known as
The Week's War News In Re
view" are designed to acquaint stu
dents with the political, economic,
and military aspects of the war,
so that they may converse more
Inelligently upon the subject.

Aisne-Marn-

Oise-Marn- e,

PI GH

Meuse-Argon-

"All other things being equal,
the college graduate should advance more quickly in the army
man." Col.
than the
Paul C. Paschal said yesterday in
an interview with The Kernel.
"Though every man is treated
alike, and given equal opportunity
for advancemnt," Colonel Paschal
continued, "the man with a college education should, if he applies
himself, move toward rapidly, whether he is assigned to cook, to do
office work, to dig trenches, to
stand guard or to drive a truck, the
college man will have opportunity
to apply his education in order to do
a. better iob."
The army is just like the rest of
tlie world. Colonel Paschal explain- fd; a man is given work to do and
if he proves capable, he is given a
larger task, and as long as he
remains capable, he continues to
be promoted. The more education
non-colle-

1
j
m

w

MW COLONEL PASCHAL
. . . likes college men as officers

college man combines with his edu- ca,ion otner ualie? of
able of doing, therefore he will
ity. initiative, and leadership, he
vance to the extent to which his will
not make a first class officer.
education has prepared him.
Colonel Paschal, who has been
MAKE BEST OFFICERS
"College men usually make the
,r"' umversi y
bust officers." the colonel continued. Donnelly as
-military department, has been in
because an officers duties are
mam- - and varied requiring a broad army service since 1910. when he
ducational background." However, entered West Point.
During World War I he served
the colonel pointed out. unless the

P;1

ad- -

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l

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i

a

the command

a nroc irtct

rntnr

and general

fit

staff

Leavenworth, Kansas,
tar four years. Colonel Paschal was
also on duty in the office of the
chief of infantry in Washington.

Nol Ilia I lie's Lecherous--Bu- t
Where Are The Pell) Girls?
The Question Is:
Is It Mr. Teak
Who Clips Them?
WOOLDRIDGE
Kernel News Editor

By JIM

Now. I have never been known
as a particularly lecherous individual. I don't stand on street coi
ners when the wind is blowing lia:d
and peek at girls wearing short
skirts. Even by minu'e IV'nrlii.n
analysis, one couldn't finl i mil I
:nn overbalanced on tlie m;i"
However, when I lx!- a! a magazine. I like to see not i;nlv ',;ie articles and stories, but iiso the
vertisements and pirt'i'vs aiH.
the cartoons
:tu
r
Cartoons.
and you can see Vi
huiniro.ts
.situations. Cartoons ai tval s.rs.
-

i

Ttr

:

i

1

think.
And I'd btn hav!:n; j 'in,Ur n
over iicw.spap is .
funnies and magazines for the.r
iIRL" . . .
'PRETTY
cartoons, until recently ".!in I v,;,
;
slie wrie 10 years olih
perusing a popular met' s m.iuami
tin failure might be at ant
over in the Union builit.
tin- I'liiun building's (ofiy
PETTY CilRI. SI PriX.MrM
It's cover proclaimed a certain
"Petty Girl Supplement " Good. mg's information desk about it. Just
I roused. Must be a tirliim liiuuhs. ra.sually.
Mr. Peak cut it o:;!. You can
But when I turned to ihc ririXH-tepane the pafie wcmi'- - there I tell, because there isn't any ragged
lii; 'lit.'-'licn s
tin- ::uf!?:it bthiii'J Hit buiiJ- - ,
ftiT
-

d

'!''

-

tures

secretary

of

cutting

pic-

"nekkid" women out of
magazines but that student at the
desk was dead serious. I hope it
doesn't cost him his job.
Of course, there weren't any of
are
they? "Petty
these what
Girls" pasted on Mr. Peak's office walls, but maybe in his desk.
Maybe he uses them to get boys in

the

NUMBER 29

19-1-

Legislature To Request
Credits For Draftees
In Less Than 12 Weeks

The University budget, as approved by the legislative council and
passed by the House, passed the
Senate yesterday on a vote of 37
to 0. This gives the Unviersity an
Increased appropriation of $365,000
for the next two years.
A total of $1,543,000 was allotted
to the University for 1942-4and a
like amount for the following year.
Of this amount, $200,000 a year
will be set aside for "capital outlay," which will be used for a field
house as soon as building materials
can be obtained.
The main increases in the budget
were in the appropriations for di
visions of colleges, which includes
ordinary expenses for all colleges
except the agriculture college, and
In the funds for repairs to buildings and agricultual extension.
The bill now goes to Govenor
Keen Johnson for signature. It is
the first bill approved by both
qhambers sinee the 1942 session
began last week.
The chief speech made against
the adoption of the measure was by
Senator O. F. Hume, Madison
county Republican, who said that it
was "repugnant to the wishes of
the people" to increase any expenditures except for war efforts.
Republican Floor Leader Ray B.
Moss of Bell county and Senator
Breckinridge
Basham,
M.
Paul
county Republican, defended the
bill as the "best that could be
drawn" and urged its passage.
The bill passed the House Monday by a vote of 90 to 4.

of

YMCA

Anyway, they should have been
very amusing those Petty Girls,
And the edge was so smooth, the
tieiit t?v"

r RESOLUTION

GIVEN HILL
Annual Gay Nineties Ball T0 BE Amendment
auA
rn
m
r
Lriven tomorrow Is Submitted
T-f- c

lone

3.

Convocation,
Forum, Stamp Sale
Are Scheduled

The student legislature last night
enacted a resolution recommending
that the administration reconsider
its policy toward students entering
military service during next semes-

First costume dance of the current school year will be held from
9 to 12 p. m. tomorrow
in the
building
when
ballroom
Union
Lamp and Cross stages its annual
Gay Nineties ball.
Though costumes are not necessary for admission, persons attending are urged to don dress of the
period to compete in a
"best costume" contest, it was announced by members of the honorary.
Jamie Thompson and his
orcHestra. with Dorothy SLatten,
Atlantic City beauty contest queen,
furnishing vocal numbers, will play
for the dance.
Thompson's band, which recently
closed an engagemnt
at French
Lick Sprites hotel, will sponsor
a
novelty interlude of
songs which were popular in the 1890
period.
Th orchestra will be featured in a
radio broadcast over the
southern network of the Mutual
system
Broadcasing
which will
from the University radio
studios.
Additional
musical
entertain- i tn t
ment for th dan
triven
by the newly organized barbershop
nnintet comDosed of Rmokv Red- mon, Marshall Smith, Robertson
Bob Scott,
and Floyd

ter.

In the requested revision, the
will ask for full credit for
all "satisfactory" work taken by a
student in the semester, regardless
of the time he was drafted, and
also full credit for a student who
volunteers provided that "he registered with the intention of com-

pre-19-

on sale in the Union building, it
was announced, and each student
who buys a stamp will be given a
book in which to save the stamps.
completed, it may
the b00"
be turned in for a defense bond,
The Student Union Forum corn-t- o
mittee. Dean Holmes said, has dis-t- o
continued their "Let s Talk About
It" series in order to present a
schedule of forums on world news
entitled "War Nws of the Week

University women will inaugurate
an all out defense program on the
campus next semester In an effort
make it possible for all students
take part in the National Defense
program. Dean Sarah B. Holmes,
chairman of the Women in Defense
committee, announced yesterday.
""view.
The first major event will be
k to keeP students
convocation spon- - new
an
by the PanheUenic council. formed otl the PIitical. economic.
t&ry aspects of the war.
The meeting to be held on Feb- - and
Hanauer 15 chairman of this
ruary 5 or 6, will feature Mrs. Mary
Breckenridge. founder arid director IS10"?CAMPAIGN
of the Frontier Nursing service, as
speaker. The meeting is designed
An educational campaign is being
to act as a grand opening of the planned. Dean Holmes explained,
campus defense program.
for the purpose of educating women
The subject of Mrs. Breckenridge's in the conservation, of natural
of
will be "The American Wo- - sources and the elimination
man and her responsibility". She waste. In connection with this, the
will explain the purpose of the pres- - federal government is asking women
ent defense program and the part to sign pledges swearing to
women will play during the serve resources. These pledges. Dean
emergency. The campus defense Holms said, will be distributed on
plans will also be explained at this the campus early in the next
,
and students will be given an mester.
opportunity
to sign for various
In order to train women for
to be offered under the finite jobs in defense work, classes
program.
will be organized to teach nursing,
recreational directing, and
DEFENSE STAMP SALE

Cash prizes will be awarded the
man and woman whose costumes are
selected as best by an unannounc- ed group of judges. At the door
of the ballroom, a mustache will
be given to each man and a crepe
paper bustle for each woman.
Decorations for the dance will
In the honorary's official colors
of maroon and black.
Admission is 75 cents, couple or
stag. The tickets may be bought
from members of Lamp and Cross,

ed

-

ANTI-WAST-

In Revised Form

Thompson's Band,
New Quintet
Will Furnish Music

Women's Defense Plan
To Start Next Semester

E

con-whi-

se-ti-

secretar-Panhellen-

it out," he whispered, with a hand
over his mouth.
"Mr. Peak?" I askd. "Isn't he
the acting director of ne Union
and also the YMCA secretuiy?"
"Yeah, and he's the guy who
tore the nekkid women out."
"He did? But they should have
been quite amusing!"
So I went to Mr. Peak's office and
asked him.
MR. PEAK SAYS NO
"Not me," he replied "I never
have taken a picture ot.t of any
of the magazines in this building.
About a year ago, we received a separate picture from a magazine
to be framed I guess and I told
Pop to leave it in the oifice and
put the magazine out on the desk.
But I haven't touched any of the
magazines lately."
Now I'm not one to accuse a
YMCA

16,

YEARLY BUDGET
Dispensary Head
Points Out Dangers OF $1,543,000
Of Open Gas Heaters
PASSES SENATE
The death by monoxide poisoning of three students at
Field House Fund
Louisiana State university this
week has brought a warning to
Rapped By Senator
University of Kentucky
students.
As 'Repugnant'

Once-Bcale- n

Tilt At Knoxville
Expected To Draw
Record Crowd

FRIDAY, JANUARY

ic

council will also spon- - ial work, Dean Holmes said. How- sor the sale of defense stamps on ever, at present these classes have
the campus. Dean Holmes said. Re- - not been scheduled. Courses which
presenting all organized residences are now available include a Home
and town women, a committee of 25 Nursing class which will meet each
will have charge of the sale of Monday from 7 to 9 D.m. at the
the stamps, which will be used as a Good Samaritan hospital,
thrift project as well as an aid to I A course in First Aid for
Martha Thompson and nere wilj, be held at the
n
McMullen,
of thelpltal from 4 to 6 p.m. Thursdays
committee, emphasized that thereXThere will also be classes for teach- wiu be an effort to make the stu - ling women how to make surgical
aent Doay, stamp conscious."
dressings at the parish house of
Ten and 25 cent stamps will be "Christ church.
begin-defens-

e.

hos-An-

pleting his semester's work."
The resolution will be presented
to Dean Henry H. Hill by Russell
Patterson, president of the student
body, today before the meeting of
the executive board of the Board
of Trustees.
LEGISLATOR'S RECEPTION
The legislature also appropriated
T Tf
IIMIl M
35 dollars toward an entetainment
and reception for the State legisHENRY HILLENMEYER
is in charge of arrangements lature to express the students' ap. J.
preciation for the awarding of monfor tomorrow night's Gay Sine-tie- s ey for a field house to the Univerball
sity.
Legislators will have a section re- served at the Georgia Tech
'he Union building information
desk, or at the door tomorrow night, ball game February 16 after which
reception wiU be held in the Umon
commerce
Hillenmeyer.
Henny
urlng'
is chairman
senior from Lexington,
The S0011 committee announced
of the committee in charee of
that
Ju"lor "nd Sen
Von
rangements.
MMTibined into a ball April
Officers of the senior men's hon- - wUI
18. Bids will be available to all stu
orary are: Arthur Sanders,
dents for a charge not to excede
ident; Bronston Redmon. first
president; William Johnstone. sec- - 50 cents.
Joe Gayle, chairman of the com- James Ison.
ond
treasurer; and Ivan Potts, secre- - mittee. announced that February 5
nas been set as the deadline for
tary.
Other members are: Bill An.e. petitions for dance dates for the
Al Bauer. Thomas Bowling. Jack second semester.
AMENDMENT SUBMITTED
England.
Russell
Burgin,
Ken
The proposed SGA constitutional
Gresham. Earl Hadden. Claude
Hammond. James Harris. Nelson amendment was submitted in
Hughes,
Dave vised form to Dean Henry Hill by
Wally
Hoskins,
Keeling, Grant Lewis. Russell Pat- - Che amending committee this week.
terson,
Stanley
James Before the holidays he returned the
Penna.
Powers, Shelby Shanklin, Frank proposals with his criticism and
Shy, and George Terrell.
suggestions for improvement.
The complete resolution concem- ing the draft follows:
Whereas: there is an understandable tendency on the part of many
University of Kentucky students to
leave school because of the fear they
may be drafted before the twelfth
week of the semester and
Dl'RING LAST WAR
Whereas: during the last war
witn no strings attached, the Uni- dents who renistered in mod faith
Versitv president added.
prof. A. J. Meyer, engineering were granted credits if they left
professor and director of the Wen-feschool at any time during the se
laboratory, said the exper- - mester to served in the armed forces
imental work is now being done for and
the army and the Mawen Motor
Whereas: it U felt that the func- company. The laboratory employs tions of the University may be ser- 28 persons, including several stu- - jousiy impaired if there is a dras- dents
tic droo in its student enrollment
PERU. MEXICO LISTED
an(j
Wenner-Gren- 's
name was listed
whereas: it is felt equally that
on the state department's order sludent3 should be encouraged to
under the headings of both Peru j continue in school for as long as
and Mexico, where his assets are pojhie
located.
Tnerefore: the Student Govern- ine list exicnus uus luun oi ment wishes to request that the
economic warfare to territories out- - recent recommendations
of the Uniside the western hemisphere. On versity faculty upon
this point be
lists are firms and individuals modified as follows:
the
in Portugal and her possessions,
DRAFTED STUDENTS
Sweden, Switzerland, and Turkey.
1. That any student who receives
Wenner-Gre- n
first appeared in notice of induction
into the armed
the war news shortly after the
forces in accordance with the selecbreak of hostilities in 1939 when
tive service act. after he is rehis yaht rescued some of the sur- gistered for a semester's work at the
vivors from the torpedoed British
University, be granted credit in all
vessel Athenia. His name has been
mentioned later in connection with courses for which he is registered
and in which he is doing satispeace proposals.
factory work in the opinion of the
instructors; and if in this manner
he receives enough credits for graduation from the University that he
be granted the appropriate degree.
2. That any student who volunteers for service with the armed
forces be granted credits in the
gun teaching here in the same same manner, provided that, in
year He acquired his S. M. degree the opinion of a board to be set
from the utiiversitv of Chicago in up for the purpose of rendering
1916and nis Pn D from tllt. same judgment in such cases, he registered with the intention of comschool in 19,1(
The mathematics and astronomy pleting his semester's work.
professor is coach of the tennis
It is the opinion, of the Student
team, and a member of Pi Kappa Government Association that if
Alpha. American Mathematical so-- this is done many students, who
cietv. Tu Beta Pi. tlw Mathematical might otherwise fail to register,
,.
.
Assuciuiiuu ui America, oignia ai. may continue in school; and that
by taking such action the Univerthe American Association for the
vancement of Science. Pi Mu Epsi- - sity will not only be rendering a
Ion. and the American Association of patriotic service to the CommonUniversity Professors,
wealth and the Nation, but will be
Dr. Downing is recognized with bi- - taking the action best calculated
ographical sketches in "Who's Who to benefit students and the school
in Kentucky." "Who's Who in Amer- - by keeping the enrollment level ad
ican Education."
and "American high as possible under th circuni- Men l

Ntk.

basket-origina-

j

j

I

pres-Kagi- n,

ie.

j

Censure
Not To Affecl Air Lab
Wenner-Gre-

n

The state department's blacklist
ing of Axel

Wenner-GreSwedish
who gave the Universi- ty its ?ias,uou aeronautical researcn
laboratory In 1940, will, have no ef- on the operation of the labor- atory, it was announced by Presi
dent Herman L. Donovan.
"The laboratory is run indepen- or any of
dently of Wenner-Gre- n
Dr. Donovan
his organizations,"
said, commenting on the state de- partment's action Wednesday night
as "un- in describing Wenner-Gre- n
friendly" to the United States.
Wenner-Gre- n
was one of 1.800
persons and firms deemed last night
Dy ine state aepanmeui
ui oe aci- ing for the benefit of Axis powers,
or to whom the export of goods is
considered detrimental to Amerl- can defense.
ORDER FREEZES ASSETS
Proprty and other assets of such
persons which is in the United
or its possessions were frozen
with issue of the order.
"The laboratory is controlled by
the College of Engineering," Dr.
Donovan said. The donor of the
building made his gift outright,
n,

'

ct

ner-Gr-

out-Stat- es

freshman Cornetist Will Be
Soloist Al Musicale Sunday Downing To Discuss Eclipses
arts

Raymond
Wetzel,
and
sciences freshman from Parkers-burW. Va., will appear as cornet
soloist with the University con
cert band on the Sunday after
nOOll musicale program at 4 O'clock
in Memorial hall.
Wetzel will play Hehman Bell- Misfit's "Nannli"
anrl MTlTtt;
Chord by Arthur Sullivan, accom- panied by the band. The first num
ber is a brilliant technical piece
and the second somewhat in the na- ,
lure vi a tone poem.
A graduate Of ParkersbUrg, W.
va., nign school, wetzel is one of
a number of outstanding musicians
which that school has contributed
to the University music depart- ment.
The band will appear Sunday
under the direction of Prof. C. V.
Magureaii in a four-pa- rt
yrcgrajn
g,

-

including a patriotic group.
The complete program is as tol
lows:

In Open Class This iMorning

"Eclipses of the Sun and Moon"
the subject of the lecture
when Dr. H. H. Downing, professor
,of mathematics and astronomy,
Mannln Veen A Manx Tone
Poem
Haydn wood throws open the doors of 111, McVey
The Oood Old Way
hall, on his Mathematics and As- Reel. The mim Fiddler
Sweet Water in the Common
jtronomy oia course at ine lounn
Manx Fisherman's Evening Hymn
'10ur today.
overture. The Roman
Carnival
Hector Boriioz
Dr. Downing said yesterday that
he would be able to accomodate 150
ib.
Herrnan Beiistedt persons besides his regular class at- ?.Bpol'
will be

T

The Lost Chord

Arthur Sullivan
Cornet soloist. Raymond Wetzel
accompanied by band

icuuam...

Astronomical problems associated
eclipsese. and their causes,
hi.
Frul"
types, frequency, and appearance
wPourlh Muveme,,tl
CyprsnhouerA5' Modern'Rhapodv will be explained at the lecture. Dr.
of the Deep south
David Bennett Downing will also deal with some
historical matter associated with the
IV
Group
subject.
Th""v"1
Having received his B. C. E. degree
ugN
1h
.
'"
s
e U:ii' ersi?y In !3CS. Dcning
wto t.:.Jvr- ;hi.r. Jt"--'

-

-

Ad-wi- th

te

* 7Ae K&mel BditosUol

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL
NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY

OFFICIAL

DURWO TWW SCHOOL TtAft
hOI.IDAYS OR EXAMINATION PKKIODO

hlTW.HHID
fcuu-re- d

!!

m tto Pom Offtest tt Islington,
class mi)ttr under the Act of Murrh S,

Pat Hanaitk

Krnlui-tf- .

Jim Wooi.i.rihc:e

Itivw.

MEMBER

Kentucky Intercollrgitt
Prn AmocUUod
Lexington Board of Commerce
MteMMNTCo rom

national

advcmtisinci

P.on

mr

420

(.mllrf PmMtktrt krmntmliv
n. r
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Maoison Ave
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ofitntomt nf the writert themielvea, enrf etc
reflect ffce opinion o f&e Kernel.

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Letters

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by Bob Amnions

Doors And Howard Mooney
I really don't believe it myself, of
course, because college students
know that such things just aren't
Kssible but just the same, there is
something about the story of How-ai- d
Mooney that just can't be tossed
off as pipetalk.
There are even a few graduate
students and old workers around
the University who will swear up and
down that it's true. They don't like
to talk about it usually, because, as
I said, college students scoff at such
things. But one of these winter
niehts. if you buy them a beer or two
lo loosen their tongues a bit. they
will tell you the story . . .

Howard Mooney was spotted as a
remarkable boy before he ever came
to the University as a freshman
that was back in 1931. The story
of lii-- s high school record passing
three grades in one year, for instance, and doing independent work
on the theory of infinite numbers in
hi? junior and senior years was already well known by educators in
Kentucky, and several studies had
been made of him for educational
journals.
It didnt surprise the psychology
department much when the results
of the entrance tests were tabulated
and it was learned that Howard had
made the highest grades, in the history of the t3?sts.
It wasn't long before he was noticed around the campus, too. It
might have been his thin face, or his
long white hands, or intense black
eyes but whatever it was. it made
people notice him.
Through all his freshman year,
things went just as expected. Howard made three standings both semesters and was doing outstanding
work in everything he took up. The
campus was buzzing about this brilliant young student.
And then, along about Thanksgiving holidays of his sophomore
year, people began to notice a
change. At first, no one thought
much about it just a nervous way
he had about him. a continual glancing around
..
Eefore long, though, the habit became positively obvious, and Howard
began to do other things that people liked to talk about while they
were eating a sandwich after the
library had closed. He would suddenly glance around and walk away
from a crowd of people without saying anything; he had been found
sitting on the library steps staring
into the distance; he would wander
about the campus for hours at a
time, apparently unaware of anyone around him.
Before long. also, his class work
began to fall off. Professors would
call on him and he would seem to
be miles away; he never studied
anymore; most cf his time he just
wandered or sat and stared.
.

The psychology department, of
course, talked to him and gave him
some reflpx tests. I think, but he
wouldn't talk to them. They finally
said he had some sort of neurosis or
hysteria or something like that I
never did know the difference but
they couldn't do anything about it
because they really didn't know what
was wrong.

Man Behind The Backboard
VICE OF THE PFOI
Paul Mi Braxcr I lave yon ever beard of him!-I- f
von haven't met ibis
yon eertainlv should have, because lie's one-halof the Wildcat basketball coaching sialf.
assistant lo
Mi Braxcr is the i in
A(lol)h Rupp. I lis name is seldom mentioned
in the
His. hut he's ihe man thai lakes
awkward freshmen every Ottolwr and nuns
them into smooth hall plavers bv Christmas.
At least thev have mastered mam of the fiinela
menials bv then.
T
F.xerx fall when ihe haskelhall call is viuntlcd.
Mac is the man who meets ihe youngsters at
the door. "Have a seal, fellows," be sas.
"I know vou were a star in high school. I
know thai you were captain of ihe team, but
ibis is different this is ihe University of
and vou are going lo plav our wav or else."
That probablv would lie a ivpital Mi Braver
welcome. For a week or so vou'd think he's
bardboiled. Bui really he's not.
Ever fall MiBiaxer says, "This is ihe wotst
ever. W'hv ibex never even beard of linidamcii
lais."
bin bv the lime thai first flush game rolls
around, fundamentally they're almost ptitcil.
And before the season is over, ibex can excinic
BY BOB AMMONS
a blink like veterans.
Rest wishes item: This week the ROTC staff's Captain
During the season .f braver si. mils ai one
Johnston." was reading his classes a postcard he had just reend of Alumni gvtn floor and Catath Rupp ai

I guess the only person who really
knew what was the matter was
Harry Montgomery. Howard's roommate you know, that quiet boy with
the thick glasses. Harry never says
much about it any more, because
people are always laughing at him
for his storvv
Eecause. you see, as Harry finally
told it after it was too late Howard had trouble with doors. Yes.
I knew you'd laugh I did myself
the first time I heard it.
From the very first day Howard
had
trouble
with doors. They
seemed to hold some sort of grudge
against him; they acted as if they
were always working against him.
They never were exactly right.
When Howard would come out of
the library, for instance, where one
of the double doors is always locked,
he invariably would take the wrong
side. He would try to memorize w hich
ones they kept locked, but as sure as
he pushed hard to open one. it would
be the other one that was open.
The Union doors always opened out
when he thought they opened in.
and they opened in when he thought
they coened out. He would always
push when he should have pulled;
pull when he should have pushed.
At first this didn't bother Howard
much, and he just passed off as coincidence. But it kept up. All through
his freshman year and the first part
of his sophomore year every door
he tried was the same way. Soon he
began to realize that this was much
more than just coincidence, there
was something working here that
was more than just chance.
Slowly Howard developed a shyness of doors which grew into a
queer sort of terror. He would hesitate in front of them, knowing what
would happen, afraid that they
would not work right again . . . and
just as much afraid that they would- This came to have a terrible hold
on him. He could not force himself
to touch a door. The thought of
them was alwavs on his mind; the
dread of them filled most of his
thinking.

World Symphony
"Some of ihe more hot Ik ailed isolationists
(at exer smaller meciingsj as how
l hev are going lo impeach
President Rooscxell
after the xxar. Thev warn him solemn! v iliai if
he establishes democrat v all oxer the wot Id.
going to find himse lf out of a job. I hex i annul wait for him lo win. so ihex tan lite him."

aie still saying

he-i- s

Sininnt Cniftmi.

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T
ime
conic when I hese aps xvill pax the
jMiiallv for iheir ireacberv in the Inline- ibex
must k-- dealt with lor what ibex aie. We will
it ies and
i el a bate bv making a shambles of i he ir
show llie-iino men x." Srnalin Din Inn K.
imiIiiIidhisI mill Amri- litrlri mill nt jnr-wtiU II I llstl l
"

xxill

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(Px Senator Ham S. I ruiiian's
xvai
contrails- inxest igal ing tommiiicc) will
e.u uiein.
ehaige thai manx ol the in (l)ollar-under ihe pretense of 'giving' ihtir services to
the goxe rnme nl. baxe in fat I e xploited their
ollicial jxtsitions lo g