xt70cf9j4070 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt70cf9j4070/data/mets.xml Lawrence, John, 1753-1839. 1820  books b98-52-42679194 English Printed for Sherwood, Neely, and Jones, : London : Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. Horse racing. Horses.Scott, John, 1774-1827. Sportsman's repository  : comprising a series of highly-finished engravings, representing the horse and the dog / by John Scott, from original paintings ; accompanied with a comprehensive historical and systematic description of the different snt species of each ... by the author of "British field sports." text Sportsman's repository  : comprising a series of highly-finished engravings, representing the horse and the dog / by John Scott, from original paintings ; accompanied with a comprehensive historical and systematic description of the different snt species of each ... by the author of "British field sports." 1820 2002 true xt70cf9j4070 section xt70cf9j4070 















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      1820,

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                            THE


SPORTSMAN's REPOSITORY;

                          COMPRISING

       A SERIES OF HIGHLY-FINISHED ENGRAVINGS,
                        RP1IPRESENTING THE


               Vorot anB tTe gDom
                     IN ALL. THEIR VARIETIES;

         EXECUTED      IN THE    LINE   MANNER,


                BY JOHN SCOTT,

                     FROM ORIGINAL PAINTINGS BY
 -MARSHALL, REINAGLE, GILPIN, STUBBS, AND       COOPER:

                         Rclompanitt Wittt
         A COMIPREIIENSIVE HISTORICAL AND SYSTEMATIC DESCRIPTION
                           OF' THE
              DIFFERENT SPECIES OF EACH,
      THEIR APPROPRIATE USES, MANAGEMENT, AND IMPROVEMENT;

                       INTERSPERSED WITH
ANECDOTES OF THE MOST CELEBRATEI) HORSES AND DOGS, ANI) THEIR PROPRIETORS;
                            ALSO,
 ,A .I4RITEY OF PR.A('7'ICAtL IXFORM11ATION O.V TZRAINVING 4ND 7'HF A3IUSEVENVS OJF THE FIELD.


                           BY TH E

          AUTHOR OF " BRITISH FIELD SPORFS."




                          Lfonbout:

      PRINTED    FOR SHERWOOD, NEELY, AND JONES,
                       PATERIVOSTER-ROW.
                            1I820.

 







































































W. WILS-N, Ninter, 4,         H.tt.n-Gad-,

 

                           TO

SIR THOMAS CHARLES BUNBURY, BART.

       AN INDEPENDENT REPRESENTATIVE OF HIS NATIVE COUNTY,

                   DURING NEARLY FIFTY YEAR'S,

           THE CONSTANT, UNWEARIED FRIEND OF THE POOR,

                           .XD

   THE DISTINGUISHED BENEFACTOR OF THE BRUTE CREATION,

        Ufbi  Gork ifb most reopctfuII      3b3iatel

                       BY HIS SINCERELY ATTACHED,

                               AND FAITHFULLY DEVOTED SERVANT,

                                          THE AUTHOR.

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                         g1ntrotucttfon.



  WE lay before the public a new work on the exhaustless subject of
SPORTING, and on the nature and management of those domestic animals,
for the value and high qualities of which, this country stands pre-eminent.
We have summoned to our assistance some of the most finished models
of the graphic art, appealing to both the eye and to the mind of the reader;
and we have little doubt the validity of our appeal will be recognised.

  A very small portion of introductory observation will suffice, on a sub-
ject so universally known. Its foundation is that indissoluble chain of
connexion between man and the inferior animals, ordained by a bene-
ficent Providence, for human use and benefit, by which those animals
have been formed with various and suitable qualities for every possible
purpose, and endowed with a sufficient degree of intelligence, but no more,
which might adapt them to our use and convenience. Providence says
plainly to man, hae tibi erunt artes---be it your duty and your interest,
to subdue the beasts of the field, to discover their innate properties, to
domesticate them, to cultivate and improve them, hut above all things,
not to forget that these inferior beings, partaking in degree, of your own
nature, and in great measure, of your intellectual powers, were given for
your use, but not abuse; and that JusTIcE and MERcY are due even to
the beast.

  Hence the proper understanding and management of animals, have
formed branches of human science, which are reducible to the following

 
viii                      INTRODUCTION.
scientific divisions. ZOOLOGY and NATURAL HISTORY, which deve-
lope the history, orders, classes, and properties of animals. ZOOTOMY,
or bride anatomy. The VETERINARY ART, which teaches the manage-
ment of the larger beasts, whether in health, or in a state of disease.
The Manige, or method of training the horse for parade or war. The art
of TRAINING for the RACE COURSE, a system peculiarly English, and
derived from Classical Antiquity---and finally, to coin a new compound
term for the occasion, ZOO-ETHIOLOGY, or that part of ethics or morality,
which defines and teaches the moral treatment of beasts.

  Out of the above divisions, we have selected, as our province, the
SPORTING, VETERINARY, and MORAL, uniting, we flatter ourselves, the
utile with the dulce; and, by calling in the occasional assistance of anecdote
and character, giving relief to the gravity of solid instruction. Having
exerted ourselves faithfillly, we come not without confidence before the
grand Inquest of the public, solicitously expecting that first and greatest
reward of our labours, the verdict of PUBLIC APPROBATION.

 


CONTENTS.



nof 00or.



Pae



General Description ..............................
GodolphinArabian ..............................
Wellesley Arabian..............................
Race Horse        .......................................
Hunter ............................................
Hackney        ..........................................
Charger.............................................
Coach     Horse.......................................
Cart Horse        .......................................
Race Horses, Jupiter...........................
            Eclipse     ...........................
            Shakespeare.....................
            Childer...........................
- -        King Herod  .....................
Ponies      .............................................
Ass and     Mule     ....................................



              41br MOO

General Description..............................
Bloodhound        .......................................
SouthernHound  .................................



3
5
9
13
17
21
25
29
33
37
ib.
41
ib.
45
49



55
57
59



Stag Hound .        ...... .



Pape
63



Fox Hound ......                        67
Terrier .71
Beagles............................................. 75
Harrier.......................... ...........I....  79
Greyhound ................. , ......... 83
Italian Greyhound ........ ... I  ...... 87
Irish Greyhound .....................,,.,,....... 91
Lurcher............................................. 95
Shepherd's Dog ......                   99
Springer ...... 103
Water Spaniel ...... 107
Water Dog ..........                   111
Spanish Pointer.                       115
Pointer .119
Setter...............................................  123
Dalmatian, or Coach Dog ...................,.127
Newfoundland Dog ., 133
Greenland Dog .139
Pug,...............................................  145
Bull Dog...................   .        151
Mastiff.............................................  159
Appendix...................................... 169

 


LIST OF PLATES.



Godolphin Arabian ..............................
Wellesley Arabian         .............................
Race Horse       .......................................
Hunter .............................................
Hackney       ..........................................
Charger.        ......................................
Coach Horse.......................................
Cart Horse       .......................................
Jupiter .............................................
Eclipse and Shakespeare ........................
Childers and King Herod.......................
Ponies     .............................................
Ass and     Mule     ....................................



Bloodhound ........
Southern Hound ................................
Stag Hound  .......................................



PM.e
  3


  9
  13
  17
  21
  25
  29
  33
  37
  41
  43
  49



57
59
63



Fox Hound        .......................................
Terrier ...........................................
Beagles .............................................
Harrier .............................................
Greyhound        ......................................
Italian Greyhound..............................
Irish Greyhound         .................................
Lurcber .............................................
Shepherd's Dog .................................
Springer      ..........................................
Water Spaniel ....................................
Water Dog  .......................................
Spanish Pointer         ................................
Pointer .............................................
Setter..............................................
Dalmatian ..........................................
Newfoundland Dog ..............................
Greenland Dog....................................
Pugs ................................................
Bull Dog      ..........................................
Mastiff ............................................



Page
67
71
73
79
83
87
91
95
99
103
107
Hll
115
119
123
127
133
139
145
151
159

 










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                              THE HORSE.

OF all brute animals in a state of association with the human race, the HORSE
occupies the first and most important rank. Hie forms an indispensable link in
the chain of Creation: without him, nature's system and human enjoyments had
been incomplete. He contributes equally to the services, luxuries, and pleasures
of Man. Whether it be laboriously to till the soil, as an associate with the patient ox,
to carry the heaviest burdens, or to perform the longest and most painful journies,
the Horse is the ready and obedient slave of his master. Nature has endowed
this her favourite animal with a degree of intelligence and a generous inclination
to obedience, which render him highly susceptible of education. His form and
qualities are admirably adapted by the Eternal and Unerring Artist, to the particular
rank he is intended to fill in the scale of being. He is either fashioned to suStain
                                       B

 

2                                THE HORSE.

heavy burdens, and to endure the coarsest drudgery, or endued with that just and
beautiful svmnietry of fort n and delicacy of skin, which convey to the critical and
scientific view, ideas of perfection, and which are harbingers of the highest degree
of quadrupedad activity and speed. His full eye beanis with mildness and gene-
rosity, or sparkles with the fire of courage, energy, and action. In war, he offers
a dauntless front to the -reatest dangers, engaging in the mortal strife and clangor
ot battle, unappalled, and as actuated by an undivided and equal interest with his
rider. In the field and on the course, he exhibits a speed, and power of con-
tinuance, a firmness of nerve, a strength of muscle and elasticity of sinew, of which
no other animnal of the creation is capable; bearing his rider along, over plains,
hills, and vallies, as if impelled by supernatural energy: but all descriptions of
the horse must give place to that inspired one of Job, which has elevated and
delighlted the minds of men of all ages and all nations:---
     Ilast thou given the Horse strength   Hast thou clothed his neck with
thunder'  Canst thou make him afraid as a grasshopper     The glory of his
ikostrils is terrible. lie paweth in the valley, and rejoiceth in his strength. He
goeth on to meet the armed men. He mocketh at fear, and is not affrighted:
neither turneth he his back from the sword. The quiver rattleth against him, the
glittering spear, and the shield. He swalloweth the ground with fierceness and
rage: neither believeth he that it is the sound of the trumpet. He sayeth among
the trumpets, ha! ha! and he smelleth the battle afar off, the thunder of the cap-
tains, and the shouting."
  Job was a native of those desarts, to which is indigenous that fine and delicate
model of the horse genus, from his superior speed, styled the COURSER. These
beautiful animals are supposed to have originated in the desarts of Arabia, of Bar-
bary, and of some other parts of Africa, and from those to have migrated to the circum-
jacent countries. Granting this to be supposition, it is confirmed by an unbroken
evidence of facts during thousands of years, recourse being invariably had to those
desarts for supplies of this matchless race: but there exists no record of sufficient
antiquity to reach the first example of taming the horse, since the most ancient
histories represent him as already inured to the service of man.
  In order to have a clear understanding of the nature of this interesting animal,
it may be convenient to divide the trenus (equus cuba//us) into two original species,
the most opposite indeed to each other, both in form and qualities, namely, the
Southern and the Northern, the fine courser of the Eastern desarts, and the gross,
coarse, and bulky horse of the lowlands of Europe. The former appears as he
came perfect fromn the hand of nature, independent of the art of man; and his
activity and high spirit plainly destine him to the saddle, although in his native
regions, where the camnel and the dromedary smibniit to the heavy burdens, lie has
also been immemorially harnessed to the war chariot. The latter, a European
species, some of which are almost of elephantic size and weight, calculated chiefly

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for slow draught, are covered with coarse hair and hide, have large, round, and
porous bones, and rugged inductile sinews. These, although large and stately
animals, are seldom found of regular proportions, until improved by human art.
These species in contrast are cited as an appeal to the coiisideration of those, who con-
jecture with Buffon, that all horses have proceeded originally from one single pair,
and that the specific differences and varieties which we witness, are the mere result
of difference in soil and climate. It seenis scarcely x)ossilule that two species so
opposite and distinct, as well in external form and size, as internal quality, should
mutually and interchangeably assimilate, through any other mnediuiii than that of
intercopulation. The wild horses of South America, even upon the most arid and
desart tracks, give thus far, no countenance to the hypothesis of Bufion, retaining
their original specific distinctions of forum, after the lapse of several centuries.
These arguments however, do not militate against the Count's position, that the
light and elegant courser is the natural production of dry soils and warti climates,
provident nature having originally furnished the various wils and climates of the
earth with animals, in size, form, and constitution, suitable thereto. The horse,
under the fostering care of man, will succeed and prosper under all, but the ex-
treme degrees of climate; the species of the genus are numerous, and the varieties
almost infinite.
  From the desarts, then, the nations of antiquity were supplied with a breeding
stock of the most valuable species of the horse; and Egypt, Persia, Numidia, Mace-
donia, and Greece, are chronicled as famous for the number and excellence of their
cavalry; the latter country, in the Olympic Games, being the first to use the horse
as a courser, and to train hint to the race. The vast regions of Tartary have al-
ways possessed a light, sinewy, anmd blood-like description of this animal; and those
parts of Europe bordering upon the Eastern countries, have lIeen constantly receiving
improveuuents in their indigenous breed, from that source. The various commu-
nications also, ancient or modern, between the Easturzu countries and Europe,
whether of war or commerce, have served to stock our northern part of the world
with the horses of the East, by which our native breeds have been so changed and
unproved; but in Britain and Ireland alone, has the southern species been preserved
in a separate state and purity of blood. The Crusades, no doubt, wvere the occasion
of importing a great number of horses from the Levant into Europe.



                       THE GODOLPHIN ARABIAN

Was imported into this country, about five and twenty years after the DARLEY
ARABIAN. They were the most celebrated and valuable for their blood and high
form, as stallions, wvhich have yet appeared, and are the source of our present
best racing blood. There are sufficient reasons, however, for the supposition, that
                                       C



TIIE HORSE.



1

 

THE GODOLPHIN ARABIAN.



Lord Godolphin's horse was in reality a Barb. The public has been in constant
possession of the true portraiture of this famous horse, so remarkable and striking
in his form; which is not the case, to the regret of all true Sportsmen, with re-
spect to the Darley Arabian, of which there now exists, if it yet do exist, but
the solitary original picture, at the old mansion of -Mr. Darley; the present pos-
sessor having, it is reported, returned no answer to an application some years
since, for leave to take an engraving of it for the public satisfaction.
  The Portrait which accompanies the present description was taken by the late cele-
brated Stubhs, from an original by a French artist, now in the possession of Lord
Francis Godolphin Osborne, at his seat at Cogmagog Hills. Another, and probably
an earlier Drawing, was made from the life, by Seymour, the most reputed horse
painter of his time. Stubbs's picture gave rise to some unfavourable criticisms by
his brother artists, in respect that the elevation of the horse's crest was excessive,
indeed, totally out of nature; and it was boldly asserted at Stubbs's sale, that the
painter must have drawn upon his imagination, in order to deck out a horse with
such a lofty and swelling forehand. A well-known writer on these subjects, how-
ever, has since made an effectual, because practical defence for Stubbs and the
original dranghtsman. This writerstates, that he pointed out to the late Mr. Tat-
tersall and several other gentlemen, a horse, the property of the Duke of Portland,
with a crest acknowledged by them, to be full as lofty and extensive as that ap-
pears in the portrait of the Godolphin Arabian. The late Rev. Mr. Chafin also,
who saw the Arabian frequently in 1751-2, vouches for the correctness of Stubbs's
picture.
  This Arabian was fifteen hands in height, of great substance, of the truest con-
formation for strength and action, bearing every indication of a real courser,---a
horse of the desart. His colotr was entire brown bay, with mottles on the buttocks
and crest, excepting a small streak of white upon the hinder heels.  He was
imported into France from some capital or royal stud in Barbary, whence it was
suspected he was stolen, and said to have been foaled in 1724. So little was he
valued in France, that he was actually employed in the drudgery of drawing a
cart in the streets of Paris. Mr. Coke brought him over from France, and gave
him to Williams, master of the St. James's Coffee House, who presented him to
the Earl of Godolphin. During the years 1730 and 1731, the Arabian served in
that noble Sportsman's stud as teaser to his stallion Hobgoblin, which horse re-
fusing to cover Roxana, she was in consequence put to the Arabian, and produced
a colt foll, the famous LATH, the most elegant and beautiful, as well as the best
racer of his time. The mutual attachment between the Godolphin Arabian and a
stable cat, is well known. lie died in 1753, the most successful as a stallion of
any foreign horse, before or since imported.



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THE ARABIAN HORSE.



                       THE WELLESLEY ARABIAN.

  THE present writer having seen this fine horse, can voich for the truth of
Mr. Marshall's drawing. This horse, in figure, bearing considerable resemblance
to the larger war-horse of Europe, although possessing the delicate skin and
various other attributes of the South Eastern courser, it may be conjectured, was
the produce of some country bordering upon Arabia, where, as in England, the
Arabian or Barbary horse in process of time, acquires an increase of size and fullness
of form, together with a considerable expansion of the hoofs. This is no doubt
the effect of lower and more moist grounds, and more succulent food than can be
found in the deserts, where the dryness and purity of the air and soil compress
the animal body, impart a superior firmness and elasticity to the tendinous and
fibrous system, allowing greater powers in a smaller compass of substance, and
exalting the tone and vigour of the animal spirits. Thence horses are chosen from
the deserts for their fleetness and courage, and those from the mountainous regions
are preferred as coursers. A few of the produce of the Wellesley Arabian were
trained, but not with sufficient success to raise his reputation as a racing stallion.
  It is a curious physico-zoological fact that, the horse was a genus formerly
unknown to that vast portion of the globe, the American Continent and the Is-
lands; and that the horse found no path through which to migrate thither, until
he was imported by the Spaniards after the sulbduction of those countries. The
breed soon multiplied far bevond human need, on the rich and productive soils of
those almost unlimited regions, as well as that of horned cattle, which had been
simultaneously imported. In consequence, the animals ran wild, and in the
course of several centuries, have had such a multitudinous increase, as to have lost
all vestiges of private property. The accounts of travellers in South America are
almost incredible, as to the innumerable herds which thev saw, and the frequent
danoer of being trodden under foot by them. Herds of wild horses are also found
in the vast Tartarian regions, from the East to the borders of Russia. The native
horse of East India, is said to be small, and iinendowved with the generous qualities
of the courser, supplies of which latter, however, are constantly passing into that
coumtrv.
  Importations of the Sonthern horse have taken place npon the Continent of
Europe, during many centuries, for the purpose of improveing the native breed,
as war, carriage, and road horses. In England, such imports had not so early a
commencement, at least from the Levant, most of the breeding stock for the
purpose of improvement, being purchased on the opposite continent: but about



5

 

THE WELLESLEY ARABILAN.



the period of the reign of Elizabeth, when horse-racing had already attracted con-
siderable attention, both in England and Scotland, horses began to be imported
from the East, for that peculiar purpose, as well as for the general one of an im-
provement of the native breeds. At first it is probable that, pedigree and purity
of blood were not objects of such high consideration as they have since been; but
that any well-shaped and blood-like nag, with good action, served the purpose
either of the breeding stud or the course. Turks, Barbs, Spaniards, Arabians,
Egyptians, and Persians, were imported, without any particular preference, nor
had the Arabian horses, in those days, acquired that high distinction which they
have enjoyed since the commencement of the last century. The first James, our
first sporting monarch also, purchased of a M1r. Markham, a merchant, an Arabian
horse, at the very considerable price of five hundred pounds. This horse obtained
no reputation, being, it seems, quite unalble to race, and the horse coursers of that
day being probably aware that such might be no reasonable objection. The ill
success of this horse brought Arabians into such disrepute, that we read of few in
the scanty annals of the Turf, until the reign of Queen Anne, the last of the
Stuarts, and of our horse-racing sovereigns.
  Early in the reign of Anne, and which forms an epoch in Turf history, the
famous DARLEY ARABIAN was imported. He was sent from Aleppo by Air. Darley,
a merchant there settled, who procured him through his connections, from the
Arabian desarts; and he is one of those few horses, on the purity of the blood of
which we can have a certain reliance. Hence the consequence to a turf breeder,
of attention to the portrait of this horse, which, however imperfect in a refined or
scientific view, doubtless represents a likeness of the animal, and a sufficiently
correct view of his proportions. That he was the sire of that racer of deathless
fame, FLYING CHILDERS, and that his blood has since invariably proved the most
valuable for the stud, form the best evidence of its purity, and that the land in
which he was bred, is the native soil of the genuine courser. The Leedes Arabian
was cotemporary with the Darlev, and it is sufficient for his fame as a stallion
to say, that he was the sire of OLD LEEDES.
  The great success of Mlr. Parley with his Arabian, turned the current of fashion-
able opinion among our English Sportsmen, so much in favour of the horses of that
country, that it became a common inducement to style all horses imported from
the Levant, Arabians, whether or not they might have been really such, or
Persians, Vyrians, Eyptians, Turks, or Barbs. This has occasioned notable con-
fusion and uncertainty, but it has been experienced, that the horses of all those
countries are endowed with the properties of the race-horse in certain degrees,
and the blood of our English thorotugh-bred horse is derived from a mixture of all
those, although doubtless the blood of the Arabian and Barb predominates. The
importation of these souithern horses into Europe has proceeded as formerly, to the
present time; and great numbers have been brought to this country during the



6

 

FRENCH AND GEBRMAN STUDS---TURKMAINATTI.



present reign. The late Emperor greatly promoted their introduction into France,
and the German Princes continue to breed from them; but of late years a decided
preference has been manifested upon the continent, in favour of the English
thorough-bred horse. It is related, on the authority of a certain Prussian Count,
that a German Prince having, with the utmost care and expence, raised a most
valuable breed of horses from a son of that well-known English Racer, MORWICK
BALL, it was one of the first imperial acts of Napoleon, to lonour the proprietor
with a military order to have the whole of them marched to France, for his im-
perial majesty's use, which was promptly executed. On the same authority it is
stated, that about thirtv years since, an Arabian horse was obtained in Germany,
probably by the way of Turkey and Hungary, which proved superior, for the
beauty, strength, and worth of the stock he produced, to any which had been
before known in that country. The name of this famous stallion was TURKMAI-
NATTI, a name in equal estimation in Germany, with that of the Godolphin Arabian
in England. The valuable stock of this horse has spread over the country; and
young TURKMAINATTI at present ablv supports the honours of his family.
  The Arabians of the desart have always been breeders of horses for sale, but can
scarcely be induced to part with their mares at any price. They have three breeds,
or varieties, the inferior of which are those brought to market at a low price, and
which have been most extensively distributed in foreign countries. There is no
reason to suspect any specific difference in these breeds, the whole consisting pro-
bably in accidental superiority or inferiority of form, of which the Arabians, from
the skill and practice of so many ages, derived from father to son, may be pre-
sumed consummate judges. No people on earth can come in competition with
them, for their solicitude and care in respect to the pedigrees of their horses, which
essentially exceed even that, in the same case, bestowed upon monarchs and royal
families. The performance of the marriage ceremony of consummation between an
Arabian horse and mare of the superior or noble blood, must be first of all publicly
announced, that the necessary witnesses, men of the first rank in the country, may
be present to attest the act. The same ceremony is repeated at the birth of the
foal; and there are numbers of undoubtedly authentic pedigrees, upwards of five
hundred years old. That of the Darley Arabian was said to be one of the most
ancient.
  Horses are the chief stock and property of the Bedouin, or wandering Arab
tribes, who use them in their plundering expeditions, and in the chase, in which
most extraording relations have been made of the vast speed and continuance of
these horses, and of the little sustenance which they have required during the
performance. As oats with us, barley is the horse-corn of the Arabians, with a
little annual soiling of spring grass. No where on earth is the horse treated with
so great consideration, or, as it might be expressed, fellow-feeling, as in Arabia;
and as a consequence, no horse equals the Arabian in kindness and affection to



7

 

TRZ ARABIAN HORSZ.



human nature, and in the approach to rationality. The Arab, his wife and
children, his mare and foal, repose together under the same roof, and upon the
same bed. The social and affectionate interchange often happens, that the foal is
resting upon the bosom of the wife, and the young children sleeping upon the
neck and body of the mare! nor is there the least apprehension that the gentle
and docile animal should overlay or injure her charge. The Arabs do not beat
and abuse their horses like the two-legged brutes of polished Europe, but discourse
and reason with them, allowing them an equal share with themselves of all the
necessaries of life; and the event demonstrates their plan, as more just and rational,
far more successful than ours.
  Nevertheless the Arab, so kind and considerate to his horse generally, and even
transported with a boundless affection for him, exhibits that anomaly of conduct,
which is a common and prominent infirmity in human nature. The training and
trial of the horse, and indeed the system of horsemanship of the Arabs, are most
severe, and even irrational and cruel, perfectly fitted for the approbation of such
sophists as Chaleaubrittnt: as an example, their mode of trial for a maiden horse
of the highest form, is to ride him during the heat of their African sun, ninety
miles over the burning sands and stones of the desart, without resting, or drawing
drop or bit! and at the end of that moderate stage, to plunge him up to the chest
in water! if he will then immediately eat his corn, his blood is genuine! The
Arabian horse is not accustomed to trot, but to walk, canter, and gallop. He is
ridden with a sharp bit, which in checking him with a sudden or heavy hand,
tills his month with blood, until it becomes thoroughly callous and insensible; and
the eastern custom of suddenly stopping him in his full career, throws such a
weight upon his haunches, as either to break him down at once, or at a very
early age.



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THE RACE HORSE.



                            THE RACE HORSE.

  THE THOROUGH-BRED HORSE, or RACER, like the GAME COCK, the BULL
DOG, and the PUGILIST, are the peculiar productions of BRITAIN and IRELAND,
unequalled for high courage, stoutness of heart, and patience under suffering.
The term thorough-brcd,