xt70gb1xd964 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt70gb1xd964/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19301111  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, November 11, 1930 text The Kentucky Kernel, November 11, 1930 1930 2012 true xt70gb1xd964 section xt70gb1xd964 "Best Copy Available
THE KENTUCKY KERNEL

TUESDAY EDITION
KERNEL

SEMI-WEEKL- Y

UNIVERSITY

VOLUME XXI

ABSENCE RULES
APPROVED AT
SENATE

r

MEETING

Instructors ie Keep Absence
Lists;
May Drop Students
PENALTY IS SEVERE
FOR HOLIDAY CUTS
LhUhl Seniors. With 2.4
Standing to Have Graduate Privileges
Rules for student absences, which
a previous meeting,
wS Approved by the University
Senate at a meeting at 4:00 o Clock,
Monday afternoon. In the absence
of President McVey, Dean Paul P.
Boyd presided.
Announcements were made at this
time that no classes would be held
today during the third and fourth
hours In observance of Armistice
Day. Dean Boyd assured the Senate that Friday, November 28, the
had
day following Thanksgiving, Unibeen declred a holiday by the
versity Council.
The rules, as approved by university authorities, follows:
Section l: No student shall be
allowed any cuts in any course at
the University of Kentucky.
Section 2: The Instructor shall
keep a record of absences, and,
when In his opinion the number of
obsences for any student has become excessive, or when absences
appear to be unjustified, he shall
report such student to the Dean,
together with the total number of
absences and their dates. And the
practice of reporting dally absences to the Registrar shall be
discontinued except that alt absences occurring on the day immediately before a holiday or on the
day immediately following a holiday
shall be reported at the time of
their occurence.
Section 3: Absences shall be
counted beginning with the first
day of recitations, and late entrance
day of recitations, and late entrances shall be counted as absences.
Section 4: A student may be dropped from a course because of absence, upon the recommendation of
the Dean, and the instructor. When,
ljcrniwej ef absence, the Dean and
the instructor recommend . that a
v
uiuyin
stuaenb
mi flrr nu- -1
r&e.asme 11
I
.
I
IHI
by the Dean
to the Registrar
the student shall be dropped
and
(by the Registrar). When a student
is dropped from a class because of
report
absences the instructor shall making
the grade the student is and if
time he is dropped,
at the
this grade Is E it shall be a final

LEXINGTON,

University to
City in

Mi

Witt

The university joins with Lexington and the netien tsiaf la
commemoration of the Amis- -'
tke. The chief feature ef the
observance will be the November
convocation in Memorial hell
which will be in the nature ef
am.
an Armistice Day
Morning classes at the university will be dismissed at 10 o'clock,
according to an announsimeot
from the office of President Me-Ve- y.

pin

At 11 o'clock a minute of silent
prayer will be observed In memory of the signing of the Armistice. During this minute of prayer no student will be allowed to
enter the convocation hall.
The cadet regiment, which will
form at 0:50, will leave the parade grounds at 10:00 to Join the
Legion parade at Main and Rose.
The band will Join the regiment
on Euclid at the front of the Art
Center. Major Meredith has announced that it is compulsory
that all cadets take part in the
celebration.

GERMANY TO BE
TOPIC OF STUDY

tonic Government
n,

student

furthering the study of inter
national relations, has arranged the
following program for the study of
Germany in November, through the
cooperation of the various depart
ments and organizations on the
campus. The public is invited and
all students
are urged to avail
themselves of the opportunities to
obtain an increased knowledge of
Modern Germany."
The program:
English club, November 11, 3 p. m..
Room 211, McVey Hall; Dr. Kelley,
"Modern Germany.
Engineering Assembly, November
12. 10 a. m., Memoral Hall: Prof.
Kopplus, "Germany in Science and
Industry."
Jiistocy.emn, mm a
li.jrjMsy
noorar 302, Education winding:
Prof. Zemrod, "Student Life In
Germany."
Agricultural assembly for Men,
November 14, 9 a. m.; Prof. Hor-lach"German Agriculture."
Guignol heater, November 18, 2 p.
m.; Frank Fowler reading a trans
lation of "The Court Singer," a
play by Fank
of modern German
Section 5: When the numberstucourses from which a full time
German club, November 21 4
dent has been dropped Is sufficient p. m., Room 202 Scence Building;
to reduce his load to less than 12 D. Y. Young, "Germany's Contl- hours he must secure the written Trautman,
"Germany's Economic
permission from his Dean and file Aspect."
same in the Registrar's office hi p. m.,
Room 111, Mcvey Han; Dr.
order to remain longer in the unl- A. F. Morgenstern, the convocation
shall be speaker, will give a short talk in
Vctton 6: All absences
considered unexcused except When German.
Vesper program, November 23, 4
an excuse Is given by the Scholarship and Attendance Committee for p. m., Memorial Hall; Pni Beta
Immediately Fratenity, a program of German
absence on the day
preceding or following a holiday.un- music.
Law college convocation, Novem
Section 7: A student with an
excused absence on the day imme- ber 24, 10 a. m., Room 102, Law
or following a va- Bldg.
diately preceding
pencation or holiday shall have a
Bldg.; Judge Lyman Chalkley,
alty of three hours (and three
"German Jurisprudence."
-added to his require Jurisprudence."
2ntefor graduation, with the
Training school assembly, high
of the College of Law, where school unit, November 26, 9 a. m.,
toe penalty shall be two hours and T. S. Auditorium.
There will be an exhibition of
German prints In the Art Center
to
a satisfactory explanationfour) tne for the week of November 17, and
page
(Continued on
display of German books In the
library during the latter half of
the month.

i

STUDENT KILLED
County
IN AUTOWRECK Harrison

Wins Silver Cup

Rabert McMurray
Me?8 Harrison and Henderson counties
in
Death in Collision at Ash- were the winning participantstourPhipps and the sixth annual rural school
land; Frank
Injured nament which closed at the univer
Lloyd Featherston
sity Saturday afternoon, after two
years
Robert Li. McMurray, Jr., 23
in the
old. Guthrie. Ky., a seniorInstantly
of Commerce, was
SuS shortly after midnight SatIn
urday, when the automobilewith
which he was riding collided
street intersecanother car at a
tion In Ashland, Ky.
Prank Phipps, Ashland, a senior In the College of Education, who
was driving the car at the time 01
and bruises
the crash, received cuts Featherston,
about the head. Lloyd
freshman
a member of the Engineering class
rein the College of
ceived minor cuts and bruises.
crash
It waTlearned after the from
the party was returning school
high
Se Ashland-Huntingtthe
football game Saturday when was
occurred. McMurray
accident
of
thrown through the windshield
the car by the Impact and his head
was crushed. Medical attendants,
called to the scene of the accident,
said that death was Instantaneous.
Phipps and McMurray are members of the S. A. E. fraternity at
the university, and Featherston a
pledge. Phipps is a former mem-b- e
of the Wildcat football team,
Tom
and a brother to Jack and team.
Phipps, now playing on the
Me received a broken neck during
his final year with the team when
be embed Into a husky Unemn
durios; a game with Centre CeUefe
at Danville.

4,

OP KENTUCKY

NEW SERIES NUMBER

11, 1930

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER

Two-Da- y

By EBNA 8MITH
Letters, a quarterly magazine, is
celebrating Its fourth anniversary
with the November issue which will
be on sale Iri the book store and
the business office of The Kernel
Thursday.
It is edited by the
English department and printed by
The Kernel press.
This maeaaine beaan four years
ago. with the purpose of publishing
works of students of the university.
are now accepted
Contributions
from other sources than that of the
student body. The majority of the
contents of this Issue Is from either present students or graduates of
the university.
There are two outstanding articles one of which is "A Survey of
the Humanist Controversy,'' written
by Joe Lee Davis, a former professor of the university, who is now one
of the faculty of the University of
Michigan. The attack on humanism
is one of the most interesting and,
yet, bitterest of occurrences in the
literary world.
The other article Is "The Poetry
of Cale Young Rice," written by
Prof. E. F. Farquhar of the English
department. Cale Young Rice 6 an
eminent young poet of today and, it
is through him that there is a prise
offered for the best poem appearingan
in Letters. Mr. Rice .is. a
and his poetry brings one
more nearly a Kin 10 laeausm umh
the works of any other poet of

Art Exhibit to
Be Subject of
Student Contest
A prize is being offered by The

Amercan College Art Association
to the sorority or fraternity, that
can boast a hundred per cent at
tendance, of pledges and actives at
the exhibition, now being held at
the art center of one of the etch
ings of the display.
These etching are selections from
what critics Judge to be the finest
collection and exhibition of art in
Kentucky fo several years.
papers to be submitted by students'
o'f the university.
The essay, not
to be over 500 words, written on one
side of the paper only, and preferably typed, must be submitted1
before or on November 26, to The
American College Art Association,
at 20 West 58 street, New York City,
N. Y.
A letter containing

the name,
address, class, year and major subaccompany the essay.
jects should
The prize for this will also be taken
from the collection now on exnun-tio- n
at the university art center.
The best essay will be published in
Parnassus, a monthly publication 01
the American College Art Associa
tion. This essay will be chosen
from among those submitted by the
various university schools or art
thoughout the country.
According to Mr. Ranneis tne at
tendance has been very gratifying
during the past days. A great interest has been taken in the exhi
bition by the townspeople as well
as the university students.

Theta Sigma Phi

To Hold Pledging

Theta Sigma Phi, honorary wo
lournallsm fraternity, will
men's
hold its fall pledging at President
and Mrs. McVey's tea on the afternoon of Wednesday, November 12.
The pledges are Misses Virginia
Nevins, Fannie Woodhead. Edith
Three sophomores wno wiu De
Smith,
and Virginia Dougherty.
osphomores
who wm oe
Three
nledeed for their high scholostlc
standing and outstanding work dur
ing their freshman year ae Auce
Bruner, Delta Delta, Delta; Mary
Elizabeth Price, Zeta Tau Alpha;
and Eleanor Dawson, Chi Omega. A
meeting will be held at 3 o'clock this
afternoon by the active cnapier to
complete plans for the pledging.

days of competition in scholarship,
declamation, and athletics between
approximately 700 children representing 30 Kentucky counties.
Harrison county took first place
with a score of 69 points, winning
the silver loving cup for general
efficiency In scholarship and athletics and the cup given by the
university for efficiency in scholar
Paintsville, Louisa, Luritha,
ship. Henderson county took secand Winchester Are on
ond place, winning the cup given
Schedule
by the university and the Y. M. o.
A. for efficiency in athletics, and
Continuing with the idea of comamassed more points in athletics
and scholarship combined than the I pleting as many distant trips as
winner of the general efficiency cup, possible before the bad weather be
but the rules governing the tour- gins, four members or tne aeoate
nament prevented the counting of team journeyed to the mountain
more athletic points than the coun- towns of Paintsville and Louisa, on
ty made in scholarship tests and Friday of last week, and appearedthis rule cut Henderson county's before the two high schools in Intotal from 77 to 60. In addition to tramual discussion of the "chain
the cups given the winning coun- store" question.
John M. Kane, Clyde Reeves,
ties, each student winning first
honors in any event was given an Raleigh Hall, and William Ardery
teams.
Interscholastlo League pin, while comprised the Intramural
those who won second and third These debates mark the first ap
pearance of Mr. Hall, who comes
honors were awarded ribbons.
The race was between the two to the university from Berea Col
counties all the way through as leee.
Representatives
of the debate
they finished first and second in
both types of competition and in team appeared before the Clark
general count. Webster county County High School, Winchester, on
the
was third in the athletic events Monday, and another group will go
while Shelby county was third In to Luritha, for a discussion at the
toe sohelaski tests as well as in Furgerson School for Girls on Wed
nesday of this week.
the general caVrtency raee.

Debate Teams Make
Intramural Trips

is very well written, for a dialect
However. Nearroes have
article.
gradually beeeme more educated
and dialects have lost their charm

PROGRAM TODAY!
I

"The Spirit of Adventure in
America Will Be

wiSiLiKSi'SS SilhiSS'

drawn and dialects are not fasclnat- ing when written they must be
spoken.

hlSSS irWSSSSg?
TSllnSb

Tonic

Sting tft
I

ELDON S. DUMMIT TO
PRESIDE AT MEETING

mwnuev rail, kiuuuuic ui me
university and now its librarian. Period of Quiet in Honor of
This article takes one back to the
War Dead to Be Observed
time when printing was almost a
Before Convocation
viee.
The neetrysectlon Is divided Into
two parts. There are two poems In
nr. Edward Nlms.
the first section by Sarah Litsey,
ruterature
Unl- uy

KaLwnja gag
one ofhei- poems is "Late Tenants,"
very charming, yet, somehow vague.
And the other "Everyday Magic,7' is
extremely Idealistic and decidedly
deugntfUI.,
In the other poetry section, Jesse

"ia?

ai

principal
on
Armistice Day program to be. held
at 11 o'clock today in Memorial
hall. Eldon S. Dummit, state com- mander of the American Letrion
win preside at the meetng which

tion Thnnksgiving
At a meeting of the university
Senate late Monday afternoon it
was decided to extend the
Thanksgiving
holiday through
Friday to enable students to attend the Tennessee game.
Classes are to be dismissed
with the close of school, Wednesday, November 26, and are to be
resumed at 8 o'clock, Saturday,
November 28. Students should
bear In mind that the customary
penalty for cutting classes either
before or after this holiday period will be enforced. The penalty for this offense will be the deduction of three credit hours
from the student's record.

Dads Are To Be
Honor Guests at
V. M. L Game

of the

urtfrertRy and a regular con- - "The Star Spangled Banner," play- -

mention such as "Autumn Thistles"
and "Lines to a Pine Tree'' by
Katherine ' Carr. " Life," by Rob
Evans, and "Ache" by Sylvia Gra- -

the Woodland Christian church and
chaplain of the Man O' War post,

American Legion, will pronounce
the invocation. Several other
ical 'selections will be given by Doc- tor Kelly during-th- e
course of the
, Drcram- Edgar Valentine Smith and reew-Spirit
"The
of Adventure in
ed by Florence Crowder, a graduate
student. The other Is of a play, 'America" will be the subject of Dr.
"The Royal Family," by Virginia Nims' address. The speaker is well
Bya- known in Central Kentucky, having
! frequently
delivered addresses before university audiences. Citizens
Lexington are cordially invited
of
to be
at the progam, which
will be thTprtaclpS
celebration in the city today.

JSVZ'ffiffiLfflfrlSi

DISCUSSIONS ARE
BEGUN BY Y.M.CA.

A

Groups Are Organized

at

Fra-

ternities, Dormitories, and
Rooming Hbuses; to Continue Six Weeks

The annual series of Y. M. C. A.
discussion groups which are held in
fraternity houses, dormitories and
in the various rooming houses near
the campus started last week with
twenty groups. Several more will
begin this week. These meetings
takev place once each week for a
period of six weeks and will end
The groups' have been organize?
annually for the past 10 years. Last
year over 450 boys enrolled, and It
is expected that the total this year
will be much greater. These groups
are rated among the highest in the
south, in this type of work.
The following groups have or
ganized and have selected leaders:
Alpha Gamma Rho, S. A. Boles.
Alpha Sigma Phi, leader not yet
selected.
Alpha Tau Omega, B. N. Peak.
Campus Club. W. D. Nichols.
Delta Tau Delta, J. S. Horine.
Lambda Chi Alpha, Dr. Welling
ton Patrick.
Phi Delta Theta, Dr. H. M. Mor
gan.
Phi Kappa Tau, Dr. otto K.op- pius.
Phi Sigma Kappa, nror. is. a.
Bureau.
Phi, Kappa Alpha, Prof. H. H.
Downing.
Sigma Beta XI, Prof. Roy More- land.
Sigma Chi, Dr. Paul Walp.
Sigma Nu, Dr. A. Vandenbosch.
Trangle, L. L. Dantzler.
118 Warren Court, W. B. Collons.
628 South Lime, Mr. Berryman.
350 Harrison Ave., Glen Smith.
354 Harrson Ave., Mr. Wilder.
336 Harrison Ave., leader to be
selected.
Bradley Hall, Mr. Cheyney.
Ray Trautman, chairman of the
committee on the Y. M. C. A. cab
inet, is also organizing several
groups which have not been reported as yet.
Subjects to be discussed are: now
one should earn money; how one
should spend money; the home as a
unit of society; Christianity, a soc
ial as well as religious system; respect for law and order; the effect
of the reign of profit.

Regional Meetings
Close With Program
At Training School

.

iUn nmi.1ii.Iam

"Africa"

nrfHrP

T--

f

trfii hi

MIm.I,
,no.

Cadets of the university R. O. T.
C. unit have been detailed as ush-

ers for the occasion and include
Lawson Cornett, William A. Callis,
Ben G. Crosby, Leslie O. Cleveland,
and Roscoe D. Cooke.
President Frank L. McVey has requested that all students arrive at
Memorial hall shortly before 11
o'clock in order to observe the period of absolute quiet in honor of
those who died during the World
War. No one will be admitted Into
the building during this period.

Fry tp lUprt)ftnt
.

XL

K. at Conference

Sigma Delta Chi Will Meet

at Columbus, Ohio,
November

16-1-

8

of
Wilbur Frye, editor-in-chithe Kernel will represent the Kentucky chapter of which he is vice
president at a convention of the
Sigma Delta Chi international professional journalistic fratenity to be
held at Columbus, Ohio, Nov. 16 o
the 19th. A discussion of phases of
editing and publishing college papers
is the program to be followed.
Mr. Frye is a member of the Phi
Delta Phi honoary law fraternity
Phi Mu Alpha honorary music fraternity, first assistant announcer of
the University of Kentucky exten-tlo- n
studio of WHAS and a junior
in the law college.
The Kentucky chapter of Sigma
Delta Chi was founded in 1927. Its
present
members ae: Wlbur G.
Frye, Neil Plummer, Leonard Stran-aha- n,
Martin Glenn, Pecy H. Lan-druL. W. McMurray, Albert Stof-r- e.
Moron Walker, Vernon D. Rooks,
William A. Shafer. Howard G. Williams A. Shafer, W. Walte. Daniel
Goodman, Ed. Conboy, Hary A.
Dent. Associate Members: John G.
Stoll, Lexington Leader, Dean Paul
P. Boyd.
It Is anticipated that other members of the University Chapter will
attend the convention. They will
make an effort to secure the convention for Kentucky next year.

Colleen Moore to
Be in Lexington
Broadway Company Will Assist Movie Star in Pro-

duction of "Cindy"

Arch Selwvn. in association with
Erlanger, Inc., wil present Colleen
Moore, movie star, with a Broad
way cast of 24 actors and actresses
for one performance at Wodland
The lost of a series of regional Audltolum Flday night, November
14.
of agrlcultual instrucconferences
Miss Moore will appear in a
tors was held at tho university
comedy drama "Cindy" which has
Friday and Saturtraining school
been written especially for this tour
day, November 7 and 8.
Thirty-fiv- e
men. proiessors 01 by Jack Lalt and Benjomln F. GlaKentucky high zier, and which has been staged by
in
agriculture
schools, attended the conference, Llonal Atwlll.
Miss Anna Chandler Goff. direccoming from Lexington and vicin
ity and from counties east 01 ixrois- - tor of the Lexington College of
Music, is sponsoring this appear
ville.
G. Ivan Barnes, director 01 voca- ance. Tickets are now on sale at
will
tional education In Kentucky, and the college. The downtown sale No
Wednesday,
W. J. Edens, , Western Teachers becin at 0 a. m..
College, Bowling Green, were he vember 12, in the Phoenix Hotel
evening.
Mr. lobby. Seats range In price from
speakers Friday
Barnes discussed "Distribution of $1.00 to $2.50.
the Agricultural Teachers' Time,"
DR. MeVEY TO SPEAK
and Mr. Edens spoke on "The Professional Side of an Agricultural
Dr. Frank L. McVey. president of
Teacher's Job."
Saturday morning, Prof. Carslo the university, and Mrs. McVey will
e,
be guests of honor at an Armistice
Hammonds, of the College of
spoke on "Project Record Day celebration in Harrodsburg toG. Burd, super- night. Doctor McVey will be tho
Keeping," and
education principal speaker at a general meetvisor of agricultural
Harrodsburg
at Frankfort, discussed "Future ing in one of tho dinner at Hochurches, following a
Farmer Organisation."
celebration Is beFour previous conferences were tel Harrod. The
held at Muytleld, Princeton, Bowl ing sponsored by the Harrodsburg
Rotary Club.
ing Green nnd oweneoro.

J

Hour Classes

Will Be Dismissed

Letters Celebrates Fourth Anniversary
ARMISTICE TO BE Holiday Extended!
With Appearance of November Issue OBSERVED AT ILK.1 To Receive
Vaca-

One rather Interesting feature is
"1564 Mcaowd Street," by Mary
Esther Sheridan, a junior in the
I
College of Arts and Sciences. There
"Organization is a moral to it, very subtle to be
there Just the. same.
Arranges Program for In- sure, butFrog Town Spehlt," a Negro
"The
tensive Emphasis on Teu- dialect story, by Elizabeth 8. ciay

atnt

,

KENTUCKY,

ARMISTICE DAY!
Third nnd Fourth

"Dad's Day," which is universally
observed by all of the larger east
ern schools, will be celebrated for
the first time Saturday at the university. Those parents who attend
will be the guests of their sons and
daughters at the V. M. I. game
Saturday afternoon.
Out of courtesy to the members
of the football team the Athletic
Association has provided for the
dads to sit on the sidelines where
they can be with the boys who are
not in the game. In this way, the
ones who are most vitally interested
in the outcome of the game will
be able to see it as the guests of
AthletIc Association,
Students who are expecting guests
ior ine game may exenange tneir
student ticket for a reserved seat,
they purchase other reserved
seats, according to "Daddy" S. A.
Boles.
This has been arranged so
that the students may sit with their
parents at the game.
Announcements have been sent to
all of the fraternities and sororities
requesting that all Greek organlza
tlons cooperate in making this ven
ture a success. Numerous members
of the student body already have
procured reserved seats for their
parents and for themselves.
This ovation has been observed
for several years at a great many of
the schools in the southern and
eastern sections of the country.
'TKotherVDayhl beeirxelebrated
for a long time the world over,
but only recently has "Dad's Day"
been instigated.

FINANCE DRIVE IS
BEGUN BY Y.M.C.A.
Workers Are Organized for
Annual Campaign; Faculty
Members Are Requested to
Contribute
The annual finance drive of the

Y. M. C. A. opened last week and

approximately half of the faculty
members have contributed. A total
of $605 has been subscribed. The
goal which has been set for dona
tions from the faculty is siajoo and,
accodlng to Bart Peak, Y. M. C. A.
secretary at the university, this fig
ure will probably be surpassed with
in the next few days.
The drive among students of the
university will open this evening
with a banquet fo the workers
which will be held at 6 o'clock in
Workers
the university commons.
for the campaign will be the memsenior and freshman
bers of the
cabinets. Under the direction of
Malcolm Barnes, students will visit
dormitories, fraternity houses, and
the homes of sudents living in tne
city. Every male student will be
requested to make a contribution.
The Y. M. c. A. nas oecome an
integral part of the university, not
only In the spiritual lives of the
undergraduates, but n solving their
material problems as well. It as
sists in acquainting new siuaems
with the nature of the changed
life which they enter when they
come to the university. Among Its
varied activities are the puoncauon
of the "Freshman Bible," the operation of an employment bureau for
students, and the organization of
group discussions of practical daily
problems.
The maintenance of the Y. M. o.
A. program calls for a large outlay
of money each year. Most of this
monev must be Riven Dy tne iac- ulty and undergraduate body of the
university. If the quota is not raised
the work of the organization nec
essarily will be curtailed.
Every student snouio participate
In the program of the Y. M. O. A.
and should give as liberally as possible, Secretary Peak said. Tho present will afford an opportunity for
each man to help himself and others In a practical and religious way
he stated.
GEOLOGISTS MEET
a social meetlnE of the local
nhnnter of Siema Gamma Epsllon
honorary fraternity of geology, was
held Mondav nlnht in science nau,
Professor Crouse, eminent geologist,
who has been nrosDecting in Mexi
co, gave a very interesting talk on
his work there. Those present in
cluded the active members, geology
majors, professors, and pledges of
the fraternity, fallowing me ousi
ness session a Plate lunch was
served.

19

SUPERIOR 'CATS

DEFEATED BY
DEVILS OF DUKE
Big Blue Outplays Strong
South Carolina Team
to Lose, 14-- 7

'4.3

"FLOPPY" FORQUER IS
OUTSTANDING PLAYER
Andrews Scores on
Pass from Richards in
Final Perfed
Duke University added Its sixth
consecutive victory for the present
season Saturday at Durham, N. C,
by defeating a superior University
of Kentucky football team, 14 to 7,
before a crowd of 17,000 persons,
the largest to witness a game in
Durham this year. Kentucky gained the most ground, made the most
first downs, lost less on running
plays, completed the most pisses
and had less penalties, but the Blue
Devils collected the most points,
which, after all, Is all that is considered In the final reckoning.
A young mob of sports writers
crowded into the press Iwx at the
Duke game niid one nnd all hailed
one Captain Floppy Forqucr as one
ot the best linemen in th South.
Forquere: stopped Duke halfbacks
behind tho i!ne of scrimmage on
seven different occasions for a total
loss of 23 j arcs and played a big
part In stopping them seven other
times for no ;ialn.
Andrews scored Kentucky's touch
pass
down by receiving a
from Richards in the final period
cavana drop kicked for the extra
point. A strong rally by the Wildcats in the last half crushed Duke
plays and accounted for six first
downs, but the Devils were too wary
to allow the 'Cats to tie the score.
Bridegroom Bill Murray and Kid
Brewer were Duke's scoring backs,
Murray making the first touchdown
in the opening quarter by circling
left end for 23 yards. Brewer bucked the line for the extra point. In
the second quarter Brewer dived
over left guard for a touchdown
after a march of 37 yards down the
field. Brewer fumbled the pass from
center on the try for extra point,
but recovered to circle left end to
make the count 14.
Practically all of Kentucky's cripples, including Williams and Kelly,
saw action. Kelly carried the ban""
six times, gaining-onltwiee on runt
of 12 and 18 yards. He played less
than half of the contest. Johnson.
Yates, Spicer and Darby were sent
into the game with a minute to go
and Yates threw two passes of
more than 50 yards, but both went
out of bounds.
Kentucky tried 21 passes and
completed seven for a total gain of
93 yards. Kentucky's punting was
the best of the year, Kelly and Meyers averaging 35 yards. Meyers displayed an almost uncanny ability
to place his punts. On one occas
ion he punted out of bounds on
Duke's one-foline from the 45- yard line. Kentucky gained 204
yards from the line of scrimmage to
isi ior uuice. Duke lost 33 and
Kentucky lost 24.
Score by periods:
o00
Kentucky
Duke
7 7 o 014
Scoring: Touchdowns
Brewer,
Murray, Andrews.
Points after
touchdown Brewer (2), Cavana.
Substitutions: Kentucky Cavana,
Kelly, Spicer, Richards. Andrews,
Johnson. Yates. Duke Mason. Abbott, Hartln,
Carpenter,
Hayes,
Lemons.

07

MARGARET LEWIS

IS GUIGNOL LEAD
Cast Is Chosen by Director
Frank Fowler for "Camille,"
Second Production of the
Season

With one of the most successful
productions just behind them In the
form of "The Royal Familv" the
Guignol Players turn their attention to new fields of conquest with
an eye to make their next vehicle.
Alexander Dumas fils' "Camille."
even more enjoyable than anything
wiai iney nave ever done.
The initial tryouts were held in
the theatre on the afternoon of
October 31 and a group was selected
by Director Frank Fowler from
which he was to choose those who
were best suited to be cast In this
particular play. The following week
rehearsals were started and a tentative cast was selected. Mr. Fowler expressed his satisfaction with
the wealth of material with which
he is able to work and predicts a
performance that is sure to gain
national recognition In the "little
theatres" of the country.
The feminine lead is to be played
b.y Miss Margaret
Lewis who is
familiar to all of the patrons of
Guignol. Miss Lewis is supported
by Professor Mclntyre in the male
lead, who is also one of the "older
heads" of the local playhouse and
is recognized by critics as having
no little finesse In all of his interpretations.
The tentative cast Is as follows:
Camille, Miss Margaret Lewis; M.
Duval, R. D. In tyre; Ormand, Neal
Cain; Prudance, Ethel Morgan;
Olympe, Mary Alice Howes; St.
Goudans, Perry Kraatz; Nlchette,
Gay Loughrldge; Nannie, Lolo Robinson; Gaston, Donald Pratt; Anals,
Myra Smith; Arthur, Frank Stone;
Varvielle, Horace Minor.

$1

5v

* THE KENTUCKY

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J. KIKEL

A STEP FORWARD

CAN YOU WRITE?
And so it came to pass that
on the morning of the first day, the Philistines
were sighted by the Israelites as they "the Philistines) advanced upon the stronghold of their
enemy. The gates to the city Immediately were
ordered closed and preparations made for an
extended siege of the city. The advancing
hordes of the enemy by sundown had encamped
all over the plains encompassing the city, and
thousands of campflrcs attested the strength of
the Invaders, come to despoil the country and
carry off their rival's women for the purpose of
bearing sturdier children.
On the morning of the second day, the beleaguered people made ready for the attack
which came as soon as there was sufficient light
to permit placement of the huge rams to be used
In battering down the gates. The Philistines
gathered around the walls with al their instruments of war, only to be met with a hall of Javelins, stones and boiling water. They were repulsed, but gathered their forces anew and, recharged with new determination, once more attempted to breach the walls. So It continued all
through the day until the sun sank behind
murky clouds in the West. And the war had
not been won.
On the third day, things began to look bad
for both Invaders and defenders. The Philistines had lost many men beneath the walls,
while the Israelites discovered that their water
supply was rapidly vanishing. So it was that on
the mo