xt70k649qf64 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt70k649qf64/data/mets.xml   Kentucky Agricultural Experiment Station. 1971 journals 199 English Lexington : Agricultural Experiment Station, University of Kentucky Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. Kentucky Agricultural Experiment Station Progress report (Kentucky Agricultural Experiment Station) n.199 text Progress report (Kentucky Agricultural Experiment Station) n.199 1971 2014 true xt70k649qf64 section xt70k649qf64 ~ I KENTUCKY SOYBEAN Q
PERFORMANCE A
TESTS- 1971  
- D. B. Ecu, cHARLE.s TUTT,
J. w. HERRON, and sTuART BRABANT
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PROGRESS REPORT 199
UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY
COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE
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DEPARTMENT OF AGRONOMY
Lexington

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C/D

 Kentucky Soybean Performance
Tests—l971
By D.B. Egli, Charles Tutt, ]. W. Herron and Smart Brabant
The objective of the Kentucky Soybean Performance
i Tests is to provide an estimate of the relative performance of
soybean varieties in Kentucky. This information may be used
by growers and seedsmen to select the variety that will give the
highest total production for a specific situation. Experimental
strains of soybeans provided by the U.S. Regional Soybean
Laboratory are also tested at several locations in Kentucky.
Soybean acreage in Kentucky for 1971 was estimated to
be 764,000 acres. This represents a 37% increase over 1970 and
a 58% increase over 1969. Yield per acre for 1971 was
estimated at 30 bushels per acre, which would result in a total
i production of more than 22 million bushels. This represents an
increase in total production of 52% over 1970 and 69% over
1969. Yield per acre was 27 bushels per acre in 1970 and 28
bushels per acre in 1969.
EXPERIMENTAL METHODS
Soybean tests were conducted at four locations in the
major soybean-producing areas of the state. The testing lo-
cations, soil types, date planted and row width are shown on
the opposite page. Varieties were planted with each entry in
three plots (replieations) at all locations, with individual plots
being 4 rows wide and 20 feet long. Individual plots at the
Hartford location were 3 rows wide and 20 feet long. The
seeding rate was approximately 10 viable seed per foot of row.
In the herbicide test conducted at Henderson the plot
size was 4 rows 40 feet long. The herbicides were applied with a
tractor—mounted boom sprayer. Chemicals were applied uni-
formly by using a constant pressure ol` 30 psi. All chemicals
were applied in Water at a rate of 28 gal/A. All preplant
treatments were incorporated into the soil immediately after
2

 application. The plots were cultivated once during the summer. '·
The preplant treatments were applied on _]unc 7; however,
· owing to rainy weather, the soybeans (variety - Cutler) were not
planted until july 9 and the preemergence treatments were
applied on this date. Because of the late planting date, no yield
data were collected from the herbicide test. `
Yield
A 16—foot section from each of the center rows was
harvested for yield. Plants were cut by hand and threshcd with a
small nursery thrcsher. All brzmches and lodged plants were
harvested from each plot. The yield of the varieties is reported
as bushels per acre at 13% moisture. _
Lodging
Lodging was rated on a scale of 1 to 5; 1 : almost all
plants erect; 2 = all plants over slightly or a fcw down; 3 = all
plants over moderately or 25%-50% down; Ll I all plants over
considerably or 50%-80% down; 5 = all plants over badly.
Maturity Date
This is the date when the pods are dry and most of the
leaves have dropped. Stems are also dry, under most conditions.
Maturity may also be expressed as days earlier   or later (+)
than a standard variety. Maturity dates were not recorded at all
locations.
Height
Plant height was measured in inches from the soil
surface to the tip of the main stem.
4

 INTERPRETATION
An important step to profitable soybean production is
the selection of good seed of the best variety. The Kentucky
Soybean Performance Tests are conducted to provide infor-
` mation useful in making the selection.
Performance of soybean varieties is affected by many
factors including season, location, soil type, and time of
i planting. A particular soybean variety is adapted for full—season
growth in a band approximately 100 miles wide from north to
` south. Thus, the best variety in northern Kentucky may not be
the best in southern areas. For this reason the Kentucky
Soybean Performance Tests are conducted at several locations
in the major soybean-producing areas of the state. Data from ’
the location nearest to a particular soybean grower’s farm
probably provide the best estimate of the potential of the
soybean varieties in that area.
_ Performance of the varieties will vary from year to year.
The average performance of a variety over a period of years
provides a better estimate of its potential than its performance
in a particular year.
Small differences in yield are usually of little im-
portance. The yield of two varieties at a single location may
differ because of chance factors (difference in soil character-
istics, fertility, or availability of moisture) even though the
inherent yielding ability is the same. To decide if an observed
yield difference is real, use the LSD (least significant difference)
. value quoted in the table. If the difference in yield is greater
than the LSD value, you may be reasonably certain that the
entries actually do differ in yielding ability.
RECOZUMENDED VARIETIES
The following soybean varieties are recommended by
the Kentucky Agricultural Experiment Station for use in
Kentucky (listed in order of maturity):
5

 (Early) 1. Wayne 7. *Custer ._
2. Calland 8. Hill
. 3. Clark 63 9. *Dyer
4. Cutler 10. Dare
5. Cutler 71 11. York
6. Kent 12. Hood (Late) .
*S0ybean Cyst Nematode Resistant A
These varieties have been tested for a minimum of three
years in Kentucky and have been shown t0 be superior in yield i
and other agronomic characteristics. Varieties that are not on
the recommended list are included in the tests to evaluate their
potential, and some may eventually be added to the recom-
· mended list. Table 1 lists the characteristics and disease
reactions of the recommended varieties. .
New Varieties
Two new varieties, Calland and Cutler 71 were added to
the recommended list this year. Calland was developed at
Purdue University and released Aug. 31, 1968. Calland is
approximately 2 days later in maturity than Wayne and 2 days
- earlier than Clark 63. Other characteristics of Calland are shown
in Table 1. Tests over a period of several years in Kentucky have
shown Calland to be somewhat higher yielding than Wayne.
Cutler 71 was also developed at Purdue University and
released Feb. 15, 1971. Cutler 71 was developed through a back
cross program to incorporate phytophthora root—rot resistance
into Cutler. Consequently, Cutler 71 is very similar to Cutler in
most agronomic characteristics including yield, but it is resistant
to phytophthora root-rot while Cutler is susceptible to this
disease. The characteristics ol Cutler 71 are shown in Table 1.
Seed supplies ol Cutler 71 will not be available in large
quantities until 1973.
Two varieties (Columbus and Mack) that were released
in 1971 were included in the performance tests for the first
time in 1971. Columbus was developed by the Kansas Agri-
6

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7

 cultural Experiment Station and is approximately 9 days later .4
than Cutler.
y Mack was released by the Arkansas Agricultural Experi-
ment Station and incorporates good yielding ability with
resistance to the soybean cyst nematode. Since these varieties
were released in 1971, seed will not be available in large .
quantities for several years. ·
Certified Seed
Always plant high quality seed of recommended
varieties. Certified soybean seed is a reliable source of good
seed. Certified seed has passed rigid field and laboratory
_ standards for genetic identity and purity of a variety. Certified
soybean seed also has good germination and freedom from
noxious weed seed and other crop seed. The experiment station l
recommends that Kentucky certified seed be used whenever
possible for growing a commercial crop of soybeans.
Herbicide Test
Data from the herbicide test at Henderson are presented
in Table 8. Ratings are given as the percent control for both
grassy and broadleaf type weeds. Percent control ratings were
made on August 19 after the plots had been cultivated. These
data represent the performance of these herbicides at one
location and should be used in conjunction with Ky. Coop. Ext.
Misc. 113-K, "Chemical Control of Weeds in Farm Crops in
Kentucky—1972," which incorporates information from many
locations.
8

 Table 2. Henderson, Ky.
. Yield (Bu/A) U 1/
Variety 1970-71 1971 Lodging- Height(in.)—
Wayne @7.7 @5.0 3.3 36.0
SRF-300 @8.@ @3.8 3.3 37.0
SRF-307 —- @0.1 3.0 37.3
Ca11and @7.9 @2.8 1.7 38.7
Clark 63 @5.2 39.9 3.0 36.7
SRF-@00_ -— @0.7 3.7 36.3
Cutler @7.5 @@.3 1.8 38.0
Cutler 71 -— @3.6 2.2 @0.7
· Kent 51.@ @7.9 1.7 39.0
SRF-@50 -- @8.8 2.0 @0.0
Columbus -- @3.2 3.5 @1.0
Mack —— 38.7 @.0 32.7
Dare 50.7 @8.8 3.2 3@.7
York 53.7 @7.0 3.3 38.0
Mean @9.1 @3.9
LSD N.S.
V 1/ 1971 Data Only.
Table 3. Henderson, Ky. Three-Year Summary 1969-71
Yield
Variety (Bu/A) Lodging Height(in.)
Wayne @6.6 2.3 @0.7
Clark 63 · @3.@ 2.3 @2.9
Cutler @9.5 1.7 @2.0
Kent @8.1 1.8 @@.0
Dare @5.7 3.1 @0.9
- Mean @6.7
9

 Table 4. Hartford, Ky.
Yxeld ZBu7K$ 1/ 1/
Variety 1970-71 1971 Lodging" Height(in.}_
Wayne 35.1 32.0 1.0 33.0 z
SRF-300 -- 34.3 1.3 33.3
Adelphia 34.1 22.8 1.0 23.7
Calland 42.2 35.6 1.2 34.3
Clark 63 39.6 34.7 1.5 37.0
SRF-400 —- 34.6 1.5 37.7 l
Cutler 43.9 43.2 1.2 36.3
V Kent 39.5 38.7 1.0 35.3
Columbus -- 43.1 2.7 35.7
Dare 40.9 39.2 3.2 36.0
York 40.1 40.6 1.5 36.0 ·
Mean 39.4 36.2
LSD (.05) 7.3 bu/acre `
_  
1/ 1971 Data Only.
Table 5. Princeton, Ky.
I   Iawjlxj . 1/ . 1/ I UV 1/
Varxety 1970-71 1971 Matur1ty” LOdglDg_ He1ght(1n.)‘
Wayne 46.6 48.4 9/5 1.0 35.7
SRF-300 -- 40.8 9/5 2.7 37.7
SRF-307 -- 47.0 9/5 3.7 39.3
Calland -- 54.2 9/5 1.3 37.0
Clark 63 49.2 49.6 9/11 2.7 41.7
SRF-400 -- 45.6 9/ll 3.0 39.7 ‘
Cutler 55.4 54.1 9/12 1.0 41.7
Cutler 71 -- 54.7 9/11 1.3 42.3
Kent 52.6 52.8 9/19 1.7 41.0
SRF-450 -— 49.4 9/19 1.3 40.0
Columbus -- 41.7 9/25 2.0 47.3
Mack -- 43.6 10/7 2.3 40.7
Dare 41.9 40.7 10/9 1.7 40.0
York 46.9 45.3 10/10 1.7 39.7
Hood 45.2 45.3 10/12 2.0 41.3
Mean 48.3 47.5
LSD (.05) 9.7 bu/A
 
1/ 1971 Data On1y_ 10

 Table 6. Princeton, Ky. Three-Year Summary 1969-71
 
Variety Yie1d(Bu/A) Maturity Lodging Height(in.)
Wayne &5.5 0 2.5 39.8
Clark 63 A5.8 +5 3.0 h&.5
Cutler Q9.5 +9 2.A Q3.3
Kent b9.2 +12 2.2 Q2.3
' Dare &6.0 +32 2.8 h0.0
York 49.h +33 2.h 40.2
Hood 47.0 +36 2.7 Q1.1
Mean Q7.5
 
Table 7. Clinton, Ky.
 
Variety 1970-71 1971 Lodging' Height(in.)_
Clark 63 30.1 22.Q 5.0 Q5.3
SRF-Q00 —- 27.0 5.0 Q7.7
Cutler 32.6 2é.Q 5.0 Ql.7
Cutler 71 —- 25.1 4.3 A6.3
_ Kent 33.2 27.2 Q.7 Q&.0
Columbus -- 28.6 Q.7 h5.0
Mack —- 29.2 5.0 47.7
Dare 31.8 21.6 Q.7 QQ.0
York 36.2 31.1 Q.0 33.7
Hood 3h.7 27.Q 5.0 A6.0
Lee 68 33.2 2&.b Q.0 h6.3
Pickett 71 -- 27.6 Q.3 Q5.7
Mean 33.1 26.3
LSD (.05) 7.3 bu/acre
 
1/ 1971 Data Only.
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