xt70p26q046g https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt70p26q046g/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19560525  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, May 25, 1956 text The Kentucky Kernel, May 25, 1956 1956 2013 true xt70p26q046g section xt70p26q046g Kernel Staff Announced

1956-5- 7

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MARNEY BEARD

LIZ BELL

The members of the 1956-5- 7 Kernel staff were named
at a meeting of the Board of Student Publications last

The Kernel staff is made up of juniors and seniors
who will graduate in 1957. With the exception of Elizabeth Bell and Tex Thomas the new staff is composed entirely of journalism majors.
Marvin Beard, junior, was a sports writer for the Kernel and managing editor of the "Kentuckian" last year.
He is a member of Phi Kappa Tau. Lamp and Cross.
ODK, and Sigma Delta Chi. Marney is married and has
.
one daughter.
Tom Swetnam, senior, Is a member of the Patterson
Literary Society and the Wesley Foundation. Hp was
chairman of the Publicity Committee for Religious Emphasis Week.
Paul Daniel is a transfer student from Western Kentucky State College. He is a senior, a former reporter for

Tuesday.
Marvin Beard was named editor; Tom Swetnam, managing editor; Paul Daniel, news editor; Elizabeth Bell,
associate editor, and Bob White, sports editor. Tex
Thomas was named advertising and circulation manager.
Other appointments made by the Board were David
Stewart, assistant managing editor and columnist; Ann
Monarch, feature editor; Moira Quinn, society editor;
Philip Mcintosh, columnist, and Tom White, assistant
sports editor.
The Board also named the staff for the summer Kernel. They are Paul Daniel, editor; Graydon Hambrick,
managing editor and Frances Edney, news editor.

ef-

1.

R. Bernard Fitzgerald, professor
of music education and director of
the University of Texas symphonic
band for 16 years, was appointed
professor of music, director of
music education and director of
bands. His appointment becomes

effective July 1.
Dr. Charles F. Elton was named
to fill the post of director of the
Student Counseling Service. The
position was created by the Board
of Trustees in January. Dr. Elton
was Qirector of the University of
Mississippi's counseling service for
three years. Dr. Elton will take
over his duties June 1.
The Board of Trustees also announced the following changes at
UK:
College f Arts and Science
Appointments: Henry H. Jack, instructor in philosophy; Verna
livisiting instructor-i- n
brary science for the Summer Session; Tullie J. Pignani, assistant
professor of mathematics and astronomy; William F. Goodykoontz
and Robert Bryan, instructors in
English, speech and dramatic arts;
E. G. Trimble, acting head, Department cf Political Science during the absence of Amry Vanden-bosc- h,
Louis R. Ponsetto, laboratory and field assistant, Kentucky
Geological Survey.
Resignation: Thomas R. Gregory, part-tim- e
instructor in Journalism.
Leave cf absence: James A.
Ward, professor of mathematics
and astronomy, granted leave for
July and August.
Collet e f Agriculture and Home
Economic v Appointments : K e n- Nis-tendi-

rk,

neth H. Hestand. assistant county
agricultural agent, Wayne County;

Tex Thomas is a sophomore In the College of Engineering. He is married, a veteran and a former advertising solicitor-for-t- he
"Park City Daily News;"- - Bowling
Green.

'rainW-villCoL Rice, a native
Eight hundred and seventy-si- x
was graduated rum laude
academic and two honorary degrees will be awarded by the Uni- from the University of Kentucky in
versity of Kentucky at the 89th 1904 and earned an LL.B. degree
annual Commencement exercises at Harvard in 1907. He served as
Monday, May 28.
a battalion commander in. World
Recipients of the two honorary War I and as an attorney in the
degrees are two native Kentuckians office of the Judge. Advocate Genwho have won wide reeognition in eral in World War II.
He also served as attorney-adviso- r
the fields of law and journalism.
for the U.S. General AccountThey are Col. Heber Holbrook
ing Office from 1944-5president
Rice of Washington, D.C., promiof the Federal Bar Association in
nent attorney and honorary president of the United Nations League 1940 and 1941 and executive diof Lawyers, and Arthur Krock. rector of the Federal Bar As1952-5chief Washington correspondent sociation in
An honorary Doctor of Laws defor the New York Times.
gree will be conferred upon Col.

assistant county agricultural agent,
Taylor County; E. M. Johnson, as-- (
Continued on Page 12)

to

Saturday, the

ef

on

3.

President and Mrs. Herman Lee Donovan
Cordially invite
The January, June, and August graduates, xoith their families
The alumni, with their families
The faculty and staff icith their xeii'es,
And
The friends of the Vnixersity of Kentucky
To attend the Commencement Tea
y

from Princeton University. He began his journalistic career as a
reported in Louisville from which
he advanced to Washington correspondent, editorial manager and
editor-in-chiof the Louisville
Times. He Joined the New York
Times Board of Editors In 1927
and since 1932 has been Its Wafch-ingtcorrespondent.
In both 193S and 1938, Krock wa
awarded the Pulitzer Prle for
Washington correspondent. II e
contributed numerous syndicated
articles from the Paris Peace Conference after World War I. and
was decorated with the Legion
dilonneur and the Knight's CroM
in the Order of St. Olav.
Rice.
In keeping with the policy In- Glasgow, was
Krock, a native of
graduated from Lewis Institute,
(Continued on Page 12)
and received a graduate degree
e,

2;

Mrs. Naomi S. Christian, assistant
nome demonstration agent, Johnson County; Holland P. Thrasher,

Three-thirt-

YMCA.

'f

Trustees Okay
Staff Changes

fective Sept.

the Kernel and a member of Sigma Delta Cht.
Elizabeth Bell is an English major in the College of
Education. She has a 3.4 standing and was chosen by
the Kernel as one of the top 10 roods on the campus thu
year. She is past president of Kappa Kappa Oamma.
Bob (Scoop) White was intramural manager and warden of Sigma Alpha Epsilon. He edited the "SAK Newsletter". He is secretary of SiRtna Delta Cht. a two year
veteran of the Kernel sports staff and a member of tho

For Commencement

University of Kentucky,
Number 28
Lexington, Ky., Friday, May 25, 1956

VoI.XL.VII

Marlatt's appointment becomes

TAI L DANIEL

chedmle Announced

TSJEIRNIEIL

The executive committee of the
Board of Trustees approved three
major appointments to the UK
staff at a meeting Friday afternoon.
Dr. Atfcy Lindsey Marlatt, professor of heme economics at Kansas State College, will succeed Dr.
Statie E. Erikson as director of
the Schcol of Home Economics.
Dr. Erickson has asked to be relieved cf administrative
duties.
She has been a staff member of
the College of Agriculture and
Home Economics since 1925. Dr.

"SCOOP" WHITE

Tive-thirt-

txventy-sixt-

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o'clock
of May,

At
Maxxvell Place

ODK Makes Change
In Tag Sale Awards
ODK, senior men's leadership
honorary, will change its method
of awarding prizes for participation in its annual Fall Tag Sales
campaign, Paul R. Eggum, president of the group, said today.
Eggum said that instead of
awarding prizes to the winning
fraternity and sorority at the close
of the sales only, as has been
done in the past, awards would be
presented weekly as well. The
change will be instigated next fall.
The weekly awards will consist
of silver cups the size of the cups
previously given to the second
complace winners in the over-a- ll
petition. These cups will be
awarded to the fraternity and sorority turning ia the largest totaj

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receipts for the week, regardless
of the number of members in the
organization. They will be presented to the winning groups between the halves of each home

football game.
At the close of the sales, sets of
silver candelbara will be awarded
to the fraternity and sorority turning in the highest total receipts
per capita, based on the entire
campaign.
Mimeographed sheets will be
sent to each organization expecting to participate in the Tag Sales
next fall, Eggum said. These
sheets, which will be distributed
sometime before the close of the
present semester, will explain the
change in complete detail.

Wk

"v-

-

Kernel Kutic
Wow! This week's Kernel Kutie ts vivacious Bettye Sue Arnsparger.
Bettye b a sophomore In the College of Arts and Sciences and l
from Lexington. You may pick up your orchid any time, Rettye,
at the Lexington flower Shop Just oppoUte the Good Samaritan)

Hospital.

* 2

TIIK KENTUCKY KERNEL Friday. May 23. !!).'

Short Sluff
Clemmons,
professor of Home Economics, will attend the conference
of the American Institute of BakShe
ing, In Chicago, June
v ill speak June 7 as a consultant
in planniiiR Nutrition Workshop
Material for Elementary Teachers.
Mrs.

Anne

M.

as-ftlst-

5-- 9.

Eight Faculty Members
Named To Receive
Fifty Year Awards

...aiulfoeliajiluui

Awards for 50 years of meritor- nomics until placed on special asLunch Club officers are ious service will be presented to signment.
Dutch
Professor Edwin S. Good Joined
Drue Cox, president; Connie Gold- eight members of the University
Deanna John- faculty and staff as a feature of the UK faculty in 1906. He is a
berg, vice president;
son, secretary; Anne Whitaker, this year's commencement exer- professor of animal husbandry on
special statUs.
treasurer, and Alma Lancaster, cises.
will consist
YWCA cabinet.
delegate to the
The awards
Dean Theodore T. Jones, proof an inscribed bronze plaque and fessor of ancient languages and
Newly elected Cosmopolitan will be presented to the recipients
of students, joined
' Club officers are Adib Salkaly, Le- by President Herman L. Donovan former dean1904.
the staff in
banon, president; Pranab Mandal, immediately following the comMiss Margaret I. King,
India, vice president; Albert Rofe, mencement address by the Presi- emeritus, joined the staff librarian
in 1905.
Egypt, secretary, and Luis Arce, dent, tnd Just prior to the recogniProfessor Florence O. Stout beBolivia, treasurer.
tion of the UK graduating class
came a member of the staff in
of 1906.
Recipients of the award, which 1902 and upon her retirement was
The YMCA and YWCA will carry on a summer school program. is being given by the University professor of physical education.
Professor William S. Webb, oneAnyone interested should stop in for the first time this year, are:
of the "Y" offices.
William J. Carrell, who time head of the Physics and
Professor
either
Joined the staff in civil engineer- Anthropology Departments, joined
in 1905. Professor
the
Seven delegates from the Uni- ing ip 1906. Professor Carrel is now Webb faculty of the world's fore
is one
living in Lafayette. Indiana.
versity YWCA and YMCA will atcm prehistoric life
tend the Southern Region Student Professor Mary L. Didlake, who most authorities
Entomology staff in of the Ohio Valley.
Joined the

Keep all the gay,
moments of your wedding
day, of getting ready, the so
lemnity of the service, and the
last goodbye in a professionally made seriea of candid
photcgraphs . . . made by a
skilled photographer who will
never get in the way.
heart-stop-pin- g

J

..

"Your Portrait
Deserves The
Very Best!"

'

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ADAM PEPIOT STUDIO
Wellington Arams
510

E.

MAIN ST.

PH0NE2-746- 6

1901.

It's Our Pleasure
To Serve the Students

Miss Oleva L. Ginocchio, who
joined the Btaff in 1906. She was
administrative assistant in the College of Agriculture and Home Eco- -

ADAMS

"Y" Conference to be held at Emory and Henry College. Emory, Va.,

Next to Southern Station

683

S. BROADWAY

June

A

DUNN'S
THE

"crum

3.

The theme of the conference is
"The Christian Student in His
Contemporary Setting."
The delegates are Donalene
Sapp, Betty Jo Fritz, Olson Huff,
Gene Cravens, Joyce Laase, YWCA
executive secretary, Bart Peak,
YMCA" executive secretary, and
Mrs. Ernest Nessiue, chairman of
the YWCA advisory board. "

FINER FOODS
USE

'THE

PACER ROOM FOR YOUR
SORORITY, FRATERNITY
AND CLUB

PARTIES
for
Phone
Reservations
4-43-

73

7

Dl V

DRUG STORE"

k

A. B. in Fountain Service
B. S. in Cosmetics
M.A. in School Supplies
M.S. in Prescriptions
Ph.D. in Service

3

I

NOTED FOR

A

The Student Union Board is
planning a tea honoring graduating seniors immediately following
the Baccalaureate Address Sunday, i
May 27. The tea will be held in
the Blue Grass Room of the SUB.
New and retiring board members
will be host to the graduates, their
families and friends, the staff, and
faculty.
The Student Union Board members are Spanky Glenn, Nancy
Boggs, Marlene Begley, Janice i. '?
Gover, and Betsy Patterson.

U

Dunn Dm

Wo

LIME AND MAXWELL

p..

r

For Your Used Books

w
'

Campus Book St
AAcVEY

HAIL

Co.

* 3

THE KENTUCKY KKKNKL. Friday. May 25. 19.r

"Dame school were fitablkhM
(or young children v. ho lrnrncl to
rriui from horntxmks. Thrre wftrt
printed shorts of p.prr slipprtl between two pieces of iran.purcnfj

i

M eet

1

The New Kentuckian Staff

tMlMldI3

horn.

y.;,.y.

.

Tho

SHORTEST
RoUtO

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nis

skills. Kath
rirn Gibbs is favored bf
most collect women..
nd employers, too.

V

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to business success

thorough traininc in

7Spxl

Cttint lot Cell
0

CoH

Wom

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GIRLS AT WORK

K AT HAniND

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GDDDS

X.

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DOS MILLS

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all cyc$ are on you
admiring
your easy elegance in a dress that has so
much of everything no one would ever guess
its price (a typical Loom and Needle trick
after that. Our Summer Terrace is full of
them In handsome cotton black, pink,
blue, sizes 9 to 15.
14.95
SUDDENLY

J
IJ

JJ

.

V
J

Jl7

III

ill

Dr. Gerhard Probst, instructor
in German, will leave on June 5
for a tour of the United States.
Pis trip will be partly sponsored
by the Committee on Friendly Relations Among Foreign Students,
an organization in New York that
has set up a program designed to

toon an) tfLedb
On the Esplanade

help foreign students and young
professional people to explore the
United States.

at its

To)

o)

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KENTUCKY'S FINEST

MINIATURE GOLF
CARPETED GREENS

4

EVERY HOLE A CHALLENGE!

SPECIAL RATES
TO CLUBS AND PARTIES

it
y

DRIVING RANGE
O

Golf

:i

HkIiM
I

...

MOirctAII. n. j. . II

Ftym

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in

THE GRIM AND GRISLY ADVENTURES OF
NORBERT SIGAFOOS, AMERICAN
If you squeam, read

no further, for today's column is not

for

the squeamish.
It is a harrowing story which begins in 1946 when Norbcrt
Sisrafoos, an ichthyology major from UCLA, went on r field trip
with his class to Monterey Bay to study the many fish and
crustaceans who make their homes in these waters.
But truth to tell, Norbcrt was not very interested in ichthyology. What he was interested in was television, which in 1946
was an exciting new infant industry. While his classmate
leaned over the rail of the boat, studying the tunny and amber-jac- k
which swarmed below, Norbert just leaned and thought
about television. Thus preoccupied, he fell overboard and, all
unnoticed, was washed

far out to sea.

A strong swimmer, Norbert, after 43 days, sighted land- -a
tiny atoll, far away from the normal sea lanes. Tired but happy,

he clambered ashore. Being a college man, he was, of course,
fearless, resourceful, and clean in mind, body, and spirit. He
built himself a snug shelter, fashioned traps for animals, wovo
fishing lines, and arranged day and night signals to attract
any passing ships.

and "little."

But, withal, he was a good hearted man, and he gave Norbert
fresh clothes, a razor, and a cheroot.
"No, thank you," said Norbert to the cigar. "I'm a Philip
Morris man myself. Have you ever smoked Philip Morris?"
"A little," said Ralph Gomez.
"Then you know what I mean when I talk about their yummy
goodness, their delicately reared tobaccos, their soothing, consoling, uplifting, unfailing gentleness-pa- ck
after pack after
pack," said Norbert
"A little," said Ralph Gomez.
"I suppose you're wondering," said Norbert, "how I kept my
sanity during all those years on the island."
"A little," said Ralph Gomez.
"Well, I'll tell y;ou," said Norbert. "I Ve been thinking about
television because that's what I want to go into when I get back;
For nine years I've been sitting ort that island thinking up
brand new shows for television. And I've got some marvelous
new ideas! I've got one terrific idea for a show where a panel
of experts tries to guess people's occupations. 'What's My Line7
I call it. Then I've got one, a real doozy, where you pull somebody unexpectedly out of the studio audience and do his whole
life story. "This Is Your Life 1 call it. But that's not all! I
thought up a real
of an idea for a quiz show where
you give away not $64, not $6100, but-g- et
this, Ralph Gomez-- ft;
l,ooo! Wow, I can hardly wait to get back to the States and
sell these fabulous ideas to the networks!"

U-Pa-

er

is, fortunately, a happy ending to this chilling tale. Nor-

bert never had to suffer the bitter disappointment of learning
that all his ideas had long since been thought of by other people.
Why not? Because the Portuguese tanker, Molly O'Day, struck
a reef the day after picking up Norbert and, I am gratified to

PELFREY, Pro)

One Quarter Milq South of
OPEN DAILY FROM 8 A.M.

Though nine years went by, Norbert never abandoned hope
of being rescued. At long last, his patience was rewarded. On
October 14, 1955, he was picked up by the Portuguese tanker,
Molly O'Day.
Ralph Gomez, the ship's captain, greeted Norbert with a
torrent of Portuguese. "Do you speak English?" Norbert asked.
"A little," said Ralph Gomez, which was no less than tho
truth. He did speak a little English: two words. They were "a"

There

Leiiirsgtoim Faiirivays
Nicholasvillo Road

..

(Author 9f "Barefett Boy tvitu Chttk," tic.)

r

gut-bust-

Clubs Furnished
Beautiful Grass Fairways
Instructions
(BO-B-

II

Probst Leaving
On Tour Of U.S.

1

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11

'

OSTOK

v

Adams Named
The University Board of Student
Publications named Joyce Adams,
junior in - Journalism, editor-in-chiof the 1957 "Kentuckian", in
a meeting Tuesday afternoon.
The Board also named Sam
McCandless as associate editor.
Other staff positions filled are Don
Mills, managing editor; Tom
White, sports editor, and Mary
Kenny, sorority editor.
Miss Adams is president of The-t- a
Sigma Phi, professional journalism sorority: a member of Alpha Delta Pi. Panhellenic, Wesley
Foundation, YWCA, and she is a
Kernel reporter. She is from La
Grange.
McCandless is a sophomore in
journalism. He is vice president
of Phi Delta Theta, treasurer of
the Lances, a member of Phi Eta
Sigma, Keys, and the golf team.
McCandless is from Bardstown.
Mills is also a journalism sophomore. He is president of Alpha
Tau Omega and a member of the
Interfraternity Council. He is from
Clinton.
Tom White is from Plymouth,
Ind. He is a member of Tau Kappa Epsilon, IFC, the United Students Party, and a sports writer
for the Kernel. Tom is a junior.
Miss Kenny Is a Home Economics major from Louisville. A
junior, she is Alpha Delta Pi corresponding secretary, a Kernel reporter, and a member of WAA and
the Newman Club.

S KG It STAR I At.

I

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Editor-in-Chie- f

I

JOVCK AIIAMS

1

TOM WHITE

SAM McCANDLESS

-

report, went down with all hands.

ss

oni

m.uiiu.n. i

If the shattering itory of Xorbrt Sigufoa$ ha$ left you limp, rout'
fart younrlf with a gentle Philip Morrlt. So lay the maker $ of Philip
Mitrri, ithu bring yuu thit column ueekly through the nhool year.

* 4

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL. Friday. Mav 2S,

IOIWi

It?

Was May Day Worth

this cash outlay.
In any parade, from the smallest hamlet's
celebration for the returning hero to the
daddy of them
Rose Parade held on
New Year's Day in Pasadena, California,
there must be a monetary loss suffered somewhere along the line.
But, as in the example of the Hose Parade,
all-th- e

if Suky and the
entering organizations persist in keeping the
present method for the May Day celebraAs a third suggestion,

town anyway and, because the parade
blocked the streets, didn't have any place
else to go.
It is also doubtful if those people, who did
see the parade were overly impressed, since
only a handful of the floats were elaborate
or beautiful enough to create such an im-

'

tion, they should at least supplement the
parade with a band or bands. Certainly no
parade can hope to be a success if the only
music heard is assorted screechings and
wierd sounds emanating from the floats
themselves.
It is a foregone conclusion that regardless
of what changes are made, if any, the local
May Day celebration can never come up to
the standard of some of the more elaborate
ones in other parts of the country. But it
would seem that if one of the above proposals or similar changes were adopted, participants in the parade would realize some
return from their time and money expended,,
even if this return were only in the form of
better publicity in the eyes of the local
citizens.

politics are to ever be divested of unwanted
elements, the place for this change to take
place is not in the general elections, but in
the primaries, where the registered voters of
each party have the opportunity to select the
party ticket for the general election.

If the new voters, who were only recently
accorded the voting privilege, would take
the initiative and turn out wholeheartedly
for the primary election, as has not been
done in the past, perhaps some of the
who scoff at primary elections could
be made to recognize their importance.
die-har-

Many

critics claim such "eyesores" as fences,- brush-pileand occasional
sewage ditches put the University in a horrible light, scenically speaking. These critics
should figuratively remove the mote from
their own eye and take a look at the various
self-style-

d

-

s,

legends inscribed in
white
over the sidewalks gracing the Univerpaint
non-removab-

le

sity grounds.
It seems quite obvious that we can't "beat
the Vols and take Monday oil" cery week.
Neither can students have the opportunity
to see "America's greatest iniler" in action
each Friday at 7:15. Vet to the casual visitor,
this would seem to be the case.
School spirit is a wonderful thing, and the
Kernel certainly does not condemn it in any
way, shape, or form. Too, the Kernel recog

ds

The Kernel, in keeping with its policy, endorses neither party nor does it endorse any
particular condidate or candidates in the
forthcoming election. It does, liovvever, endorse a wholesale participation in both the
primary and general elections on the part of
all voters, whether voting or old.

Paint

And More. White

OVER HERE WITH THAT

SOD-PACKE-

'Achilles Heel'
The "Achilles

I

over-enthusiast-

ic

g,

visors inherited In cadi new freshman class entering school.

Helping plan another person's vocation and charting out
his loui years ol college lile is a lig undertaking. Unfortunately, a large proportion of the University's advisors arc definitely unqualified for this responsibility.
One type of advisor is the kind that is so rushed and preoccupied that lie can't lit time for his advisee into his busy
schedule. Often legistration is over, and the floundering student has had to fill out his semester's schedule completely without counsel.
Another tpe is the advisor who stakes his disiutciest (or
perhaps his ignorance) against his advisee's college caiecr. he
student is usually the loser. Too many students aie loicccl to
go to summer school or take correspondence course, due to
"advisors".
misinformation given them by their
Under the present system the students have even thing to
lose and the advisors have nothing to lose. A student's college
career is much too impoitant to be placed into the hands ol
an unqualified or disinterested person.
1

How much longer is the University going to let this weakness continue to exist?

Back Talk

Smoke and Gossip
If

thejibrary could break up the smoke and gossip' groups

that cluster in the lobbies and halls, there wouldn't be any need
to complain about the hours. The place would be deserted
alter 8:30 p.m.
There isn't any reason to hold the building open during
all the week nights, if "students" are able to do their "work at
the last minute. Exactly how many people do you think would
do any assignment before Sunday night? Everybody would try
to do their wotk then; dining the rest of the time the building
would be like a tomb.
The S(i A is gieat. sine. But what has is done in campus
government? How can it allord to take on another job when
it can't do the present one propel Iv? A Student Committee-lothe l.iliar sounds something like the famous (and latuoiis)
Committee lor Establishing Traditions. It would probably
have compatible success .
Why do so many editorials slain the libraiy. when there aie
much moie vulnerable places -- for a conscientious cditoiial
writer? Things that the casual visitor to the campus can't overlook, like the Erace Hall wreck; the Social Science building;
the lNvchologv Annex and the Chemistry Annex.
II S(.
is now on a campus improvement kick, why doesn't
it stall at the beginning?
I

The Kentucky Kernel
Umm:iiity or Kkm i c ky
OH ire al
l"i.tinit at Mk
iniiml t !.!, hi, itt. r im.'ir llw
t

1'uliluln il vtit kty

liniiiii!
urul

Sl'HSClUrnON'

HAIL

Marney Beard
Elizabeth Hell
Tom Swetnam
Daniel
Bob White

is the system of ad-

led" of this University

r

nizes the value of publicity, as concerning
coming events. But if some of the
members of our student body
would at least take time to explore the possibility of covering the sidewalks with a substance that could be removed without resortall concerned would
ing to
benefit.
sand-blastin-

HM. MAC

so-calle- d

Primary Election

pitted against each other.
But most astute political observers are in
almost complete accord that if American

V

themselves.

receives similar compensation,
comparatively, for the May Day parade.
Most of the people who watched the
parade this year seemed to be cither UK
students or townpeople who were down-

18-2-

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past.
Another alternative would be for prospective entrants to interest townspeople in the
idea of sponsoring the various floats. In
this way, most of the cash burden would be
taken off the shoulders of the organizations

although the participating groups spend
enormous amounts of money getting ready
for the celebration, the publicity which the
city of Pasadena receives as a result of the
festivity is immeasurable in terms of dollars
and cents.
It is extremely doubtful if either the city
of Lexington or the University of Kentucky

On Tuesday, May 29, thousands of new
voters in the 1 year old age bracket will
go to the polls in both the Republican and
Democratic primary elections to select each
party's candidate for the United States Senate.
The election this year takes on added significance due to the recent death of Alben
W. Barkley. For the first time in many years,
Kentucky voters will have the privilege of
electing both senators in the same year.
Yet, if previous elections can be used as a
guide, only a small portion of the eligible
voters will exercise their privilege.
Voters on the American scene seem to
have the feeling, by and large, that the only
important elections are the general elections
held in the fall, when the major parties are

by Dick Bibler

greatly improve the situation.
One possible solution would seem to be
for fraternities, sororities, and interested organizations on the campus to jointly construct, in a cooperative effort, four or five
floats. ' By doing this, more time and attention could be given to each entry and the
finished products would create a much better impression of the University in the eyes
of the townspeople. If this plan were
adopted, a revision would be necessary in
the method of awarding prizes, but this
would seem to be a minor stumbling block,
since many organizations have expressed dis-- y
satisfaction over the judges' decisions in the

The annua May Day parade just concluded leaves but one question in the minds,
of the observers was it worth it?
From various estimates received, each
entering organization spent almost $100 in
preparation for the parade. Yet the feeling
that in no
seems to be almost campus-wid- e
way was there any appreciable return for

pression.
The Kernel does not advocate abolishing
completely the May Day celebration, since
it is an integral part of the University program. But it is believed that a few changes
in policy, both by the sponsoring organization and by the participating groups, would

Little man on campus

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Associate Editor

Managing

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Sports Editor

Someone once said the pen was mightier than the swomI.
Wonder it the inhabitants of Sing Sing and Alcatia. would
agree?

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Kentuchum

Dr. Ilrrman L. Donovan receives his last Kentuckian as president of
from yearbook editor Perry J. Ashley. Traditionally,
the Unive-sitthe president receives the first Kentuckian issued each year.
y

Writer Crusades
Against Cinders
However, in our mind, the last line,
"this means you," illustrates the
often assumed attitude of the adbe ministration, over

riiiL Mcintosh

By

The coining week cannot
the student.
much more hectic than the last.
This sign begs to be disobeyed.
3
With the heniors having nothing to A simple stating of the
rules is
do tut gel drunk, sober up. get
man of college
drunk, sober up. and sleep all day, sufficient for a aman
resents being
the rest of us have had a hard aliber. Such
our threatened.
time studying for exams. But
day will come. We wish the seniors
Drive carefully going home. See
all the greatest.
you next year.
And now down to business. We
sav, (noif: our nrsi crusaae).
--

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DOWN Willi BICYCLE BELAYS
ON TilF. ( INDEII TRACK. From
experier.ce, this writer savs thowe
& i '' r ) ? intramural bicycle races;
held on the track around the foot ball field are neither safe nor po;)- First, a
ular, except to the
light b:kc plus a looe i iTlcr track '
equals no rent tet of speed. Sec- -

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who has Ihrd well. Itughed
often, and loved much; who
has gained the rerwet of Intelligent men. and the hive of
little (hll.lrrn; whn.h.s filled
his nirlie and accomplished his
task; who has left the world
better than he found It.
whether br an Improved poppy, a prrfect poem, or a
d
soul; who has never
larVed appreciation of earth's
beauty, or failed to express II;
who has always looked for, the
best in others and glten the
best he had; whose life was
an inspiration: whose memory

As the weather ktows warmer
and the days pet lonccr we realize
that suniiiHT i.s mar and
year is dr.ing to an end
For most of us .summer mt ;in.
a three month Job arid return to
a carefree college life. For others
it means the end of their rolhv.i
career.
For all ef us that will be returning the summer Is just a break In
this dashing mad-ra- p
college life.
In the fall we will resume our
good times with old rollege friends.
We will return to campus socia'
life of dances, sporting events
parties, and tah yes!) the grill.
We will return to our mn inactivities, meetings, and campus
obligations.
Last but not least we will return
to our studies. Studies are the
primary purpose of college life and
it is because of them that all else
is possible. It i.s the breaks from
these studies that make your good
times so terrific.
All these things will be gone forever to the students who are graduating and leaving college for
good. The great times and carefree life of college will be Just
a memory as they go out to make
their place in the world around us.
To these graduating seniors I
would like to wish all the happiness and success possible. I hop
that they will live their life to its
fullest extent and never fail to
give their all in anything they
undertake, remembering ulwav.v
tin-schoo-

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res-rue-

a benediction."

B. A.

Hornback's Workshop.
Barf, and Preston's Kickbacks on
sports.
These boys contributed much to