xt70p26q1x1r https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt70p26q1x1r/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19651111  newspapers sn89058402 English  This digital resource may be freely searched and displayed.  Permission must be received for subsequent distribution in print or electronically.  Physical rights are retained by the owning repository.  Copyright is retained in accordance with U. S. copyright laws.  For information about permissions to reproduce or publish, contact the Special Collections Research Center. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, November 11, 1965 text The Kentucky Kernel, November 11, 1965 1965 2015 true xt70p26q1x1r section xt70p26q1x1r Inside Today's Kernel
Prestonsburg Community College director wants
focultf: Poge
Two.

IS. IE DSMlEd J
University of Kentucky

Vol. LVII, No. 42

LEXINGTON, KY., THURSDAY, NOV. 11, 1965

A new face joins Berkeley
Fire.

Women's hockey team wins two gomes:
Poge Sit.
Placement service announces interviews tor jobs: Poge Seven.
Two iolksingers lecture in English

h

fait end fancies in British dress
cussed: Poge Three.

dis-

Editor considers President Johnson's
education bill: Poge Four.

Eight Pages

stall:

Poge

literature class: Poge Eight

Plan
Endorsement
Of II Policy
Stadlentts

-

iVTV
rVl'

JLU

IrSs'

.L---;'- -

quiet,

gold-colore-

'

S

rV--

"vf

r:

tI'-

-

."

?

I

Autumn Refuge

corner on campus makes a
perfect place for studying and for enjoying a
warm autumn day which soon will be replaced
by bleak winter. Freshman art major Cary Mescher,
A

V

d

from South Ft. Mitchell, relaxes with a book
beneath trees shedding their leaves near Buell
Armory.
Kerntl photo by mck Bell

Scandals Invite GOP Win,

Democratic Senator Warns
By BILL KNAPP
Kernel Staff Writer
Scandals in the present state
will
administration
provide
ammunition for the next Republican gubernatorial
candidate,
Sen. Richard Frymire
District) told University law students Wednesday.
"The Republican candidate
will be able to point out many
scandals in this administration,
such as the personal services
contracts, influence peddling in
connection with state insurance
contracts and campaign contributions by the truckers," Frymire
said.
"What this state needs is a
reform candidate for governor, or
a candidate not associated with
either faction in the Democratic
party," he said. And added that a
Republican candidate will be difficult to beat in the next election.
Frymire also attacked Cov.
Edward T. Breathitt's failure to
support a budget review bill, the
passage of the county tax stabilization bill and wasting of time
and money in the special session
of the legislature.
"As a candidate, as governor-elec- t
and as governor, Ned
Breathitt said he supported a
budget review bill," Frymire
said. "In the last session of the
legislature, the Senate passed
such a bill which would give
members of the legislature a
watchdog on expenditures, but
the administration defeated it in
the House."
Frymire said the slogan of the
next campaign will be, "Why
can't the legislature know where
the money goes?"
The senator then commented
on House Bill No. 1, passed in
the recently adjourned special
session, which freezes and stabilizes the tax rates in every Kentucky county.
(D-Six-

"I voted against it. It

is a bad

bill," he said.
The state legislature now controls the tax rates in all Kentucky
counties, he said, and has fixed

ceilings for the next two years
with a provision for a 10 per cent
increase in 1966 and 1967.
"In the future the counties
can't increase their tax rates until
the legislature grants permission.
"No one discussed where we
will find capital to pay for staffing
the new facilities which will be
built with bond issue funds," he

if?.

said. "The administration says
that future growth of the economy
will absorb the costs of the bond
issue but where is the money
going to come from to staff the
new buildings?"
Sen. Frymire is a graduate of
the UK College of Law and represents the Sixth District located in
the Western Coalfield. In 1962
he was elected "most promising
freshman legislator," and in 1964
"most valuable representative
from the public
by
the Capitol press corps.

A three-da- y
program supporting the United States involvement
in Vietnam will be staged Nov. 17, 18 and 19 by Students for
Victory in Vietnam, an unaccredited organization, now being
sponsored ky the Cooperstown Council, governing body for Coopers-tow- n
men's residence halls.
Michael Schroeder, Arts and
A general statement of supSciences freshman and president
of the council, said Wednesday port for the war in Vietnam
the decision to support the pro- will be available for student,
gram was made by the executive faculty and staff signatures in the
Student Center television lounge
officers of the council.
"We feel there is no organ- from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. during
ization on campus which is for the three days.
the war in Vietnam," Schroeder
The statement is slated for
feel all sides of the submission
to President Lyndon
question should have an oppor- - B. Johnson and Kentucky's two
tunitytobe heard."
U.S. Senators, according to an
aid of a faculty- - announcement for the
program.
recognized organization, such as
the council, it would be impos
Films, including "A War
sible for the new group to use Within A War" and "Sand and
University facilities for the proSteel," are scheduled by the
the Student
gram, including
group in the Student Center
Center theatre.
theatre from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.
The council parliament apfor
Students
Victory in
proved support for the inVietnam, led by Paul Valdes,
fant organization's program in
sophomore agriculture major; Ed
a Wednesday night meeting.
Earlier approval had been given McAvoy, commerce senior, and
Jim Esterley, graduate in politby the council's executive comical science, is still in the
mittee after last week's parliament meeting failed to draw a formative stage, its originators
said.
quorum.

Undergrad Research
To Receive Awards
Oswald Awards for Undergraduate Research and Creativity
will be initiated this year by
the Student Centennial Committee, it was announced today.
The awards will be given
annually, and have been instituted, according to subcommittee

point-of-vie-

--

"1

n.

mT"-

-

1

chairmen Sally Gregory and John
Roach, in recognition of Dr. John
Oswald's Centennial year efforts.
The UK president's personal
interest in undergraduate research prompted the subcommittee to begin the program, the
chairmen said.
In each of the five divisions
physical science and engineering,
biological sciences, social sciences, humanities, and creative
work in the fine arts first place
winners will receive awards.
All undergraduates are eligible to participate in the contest.
A prospectus consisting of a brief
statement of plans and progress
must be submitted by the end
of January.
The final draft, not to exceed
1500 words, must be turned in
by March 15.
The judges for the contest
will select the best paper in each
division
and two runner-upapers. These papers will be read
at the awards conference on Saturday, April 2, 19G6.
consistThe
ing of Ken Combs, Pa m Johnson,
Cathy Jones, and Mary Jo Allen,
is planning a banquet to follow
the conference where the awards
will be presented to the winners.
The three outstanding papers
in each field will be published
and distributed to University
faculty members and high sc hools
and colleges around the state and
said.
nation, the
The
added that all ' interested undergraduates should
begin workon their papers as soon
as possible.
p

;1

Veterans Day 1965 The Eternal Flame Burns On
Visitor in Arlington National Cemetery in Wash- ington, D.C., home of the nation's war dead,
pause to visit the grave of another man who
battle for peace. The eternal
died in battle-t- he
flame burns atop the grave of John Fitzgerald

Kennedy. The solemn silence is broken only by
the shuffle of those praying and paying their
respects and by workers constructing a memorial
(top of picture) for the assassinated president.
Kernel

poto

by John

zh

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Thurvlay, Not.

2

11,

15

Community College News

Prestonsburg Director Wants Top Faculty
the people

Br DGLOREN COLLINS
Krmel Corrnpondtnt
rR ESTONS BURC
Otting
a
faculty into the
the
area po
FVevtonvburz
grtatrrf problem for Dr. Henry
A. Campbell, director of the
Prrtfomburg Community
"We Deed new ideal and
new tethnkjurt," he admitted.
Noting the resistance) to

ferent."

-

so dif-

A sery high proportion of instructors in the area are from
Eastern Kentucky State, Pikeville
and Morehead State Colleges.
"With all due regard to those
schools," Dr. Campbell said,
"this does tend to perpetrate
this area's mistaken idea that

top-notc- h

Col-krg-

they're not

e.

"We need a complete forestry
program. Neglect ten and fifteen
years ago has left us with a lot
of trees but little real lumber,"
he added.
Stressing the seriousness of
the "neglect" problem, he
pointed out that only one
degree in mining engineering
wis awarded Last year in the
state. Presently Dr. Campbell
is at work on a cooperative technology program which w ill enable
scholarship students to study
eight months at Prestonsburg and
work four months in Eastern
Kentucky mines.
"There's promise in this
area," Dr. Campbell said, "and
people are beginning to come
alive to it. The growing support
of our college is only one indi-

I

t

y

c. .

i

C

This is the second in a series
of art ides tcriiten by center
students on the community col-

ar jie program, he
"Our people (in Eastern
an

said,
Kentucky) have been isolated too lege directors.
onz- - They tend to think too
much of themselves as different. only natises can understand and
Hal's why I spend two and teach these people."
three months a ear chasing down
Curriculum, too, is a major
exthe really good people, getting problem. Dr. Campbell
them to come in here to show plained. In its first two years.

cation."

a (all

janile

l- -

day

24-ho- ur

tke

pr.
DR. HENRY CAMPBELL

trrnu

the college's curriculum has been
primarily a duplication of that
of the main campus.
"And that's fine," he said.
"But we also need programs
specially fitted to the the needs
of this area.

BRAND NEW CARS
INQUIRE ABOUT OUR SPECIAL
OVERNITE RATES FOR STUDENTS
PHONE 254-936- 5

FRIDAY SPECIAL
All The Fish You Can Eat
For $1.00

51
SATURDAY SPECIAL
Chopped Sirloin Steak
For $1.00

SHOWINGS DAILY AT
1:30 and 8:00 p.m.

WINNER OF 0
AWARDS

ACADEMY
InchrfMtf

SUNDAY SPECIAL
Fried Chicken Dinner
For $1.00
11:00 a.m. - 9:00 p.m.

am: mm
viarar

PERKINS PANCAKE HOUSE
NOW SHOWING

S

"THE IPCRESS FILE" IS A
TUiHrmin mjimc ,
I HimilHU KIHH 0 '
)
uULUrlfMli !
w-

-w m

w

wm

w

w

1

Phon:

l

m

But problems still exist. One
the idea of "sectionalism."
"Sometimes our name Prestonsburg Community College gets
in the way. People frequently
emphasize the first word, not the
second as they should. This is
part of 'sectionalism. "
Community support is vital
is

)

Center Announcements
"The Scope" has been selected as the new name of the
yearbook at the Henderson Community College.
The annual publication had
been
titled "The
formerly
Kitten," but was changed since
the name created a false sense
of inferiority in the college as
related to the main campus.
Sharon Felty is editor and
Mary Florence Oakley is
Both are sophomores.
A collection of editorial cartoons by Hugh Haynie, editorial

the Louisville
is on display at
the Hopkinsville
Community
College. It will remain on display
this week.
l,

Committee appointments of
the Elizabethtown Community
College chapter of the SNEA
have been made by president
Tommy McDowell.
Chairman are Dane Roper,
publicity; Mary Ann Sorrell, program; Iris Downs, constitution;
Mary Brown, social; and Sherman
Smith, nominating chairman.

a ren ce r loo re 6J
BEAUTY SALON
SouOi LimMloo

7X1

W

J

Curl Dp amd Dy For Tou"
Air CodltUm4

2nd

ISiliillltli

www

fCCMMMei
OA'l CM

TINGLING,

ciiCDrucr vjidiii
juui li lot. irtnn:

r

-- TIME

BLOOD

'II

j foir
I.

i

.

joM
.,-

iWcIl

P

y

-:

GUTS

SPY THRILLER!"
--N.r, daily mews

H

pmenti

HE

tizi
r

ifczK)
"

'

uoW ,V
'

-

X

NCUCRtINGUYDOtf)UNSUC
HAmSALnrMN-SlDNt-

CHARLES

KASHLR

ScrSMstn

TECHNICOLOR TECHNISCOPC
A

h Hi CMAMAf

low..

.

v..

s

a

wear your personal
COAT OF ARMS
engraved on a fine

LLOYD

3--

ALSO

ILK

in

maw

vw

vuuimi jui. i li mi

an w mcruiu.

iwii tRtn

Mi
'ARMER'S
.1
A.

Picture

821 Euclid Avt.
i

JULIE ANDREWS

n.

Lt it rtcommtud tk ring most luilablt for
luck dttiltd tngroving. Ordtrt for CkriUmo
delivery Mutt U i by No. 10.'

.oundv.ck ..bum

," i

Kentucky Kernel, University
Station, University of Kentucky,
Kentucky, 4U5U4.
poU pld at Lexington, Kentucky.
Published four time weekly durinjf
the school yeer except during holidays
end exam periods, and weekly during
the summer semester.
Published for the students of the
University of Kentucky by the Board
of Student Publications, Prof. Paul
Oberst. chairman and Llnd Gassaway,
secretary,
Begun as the Cadet In IBM. became the Kecord In 1VO0. and the Idee
In 1908. Published continuously es the
Kernel since 1K15.

14 Kt. gold signet ring.

1 JAMB D0M4

m'wim's

I

The Kentucky Kernel
The

nnPiccAtcoipsi

MJYlfCAl ftLEA3

tiff

AWOOOfAUnUJ
UNmO AflTBTS LOPtRT RREASf

Hobfrt u ist:

J. FURff

T

t

'totfi--

to get

NIGHTLY AT 8:15
(Except Sunday at 8:00)
Matinees: Sat., Sun., Wed.
At 2:00 p.m.

ULi PROUDLY
MICHAEL CAINE

WEEK!

W2& i
A

"A

for

cartoonist
Courier-Journa-

252-106- 5

-- NCWSWKK

"A

to the college. Dr. Campbell explained. Getting it can be another problem.
"We have m talk to the residents, and work with high
school and civic groups three and
four times a week. We have to
convince them our credits will
transfer, and our grades won't
be lowered at another school.
You'd be surprised how many
people have that idea."
"We have to convince these
people they can get a good education at home," he said. "Our
major achievement in those two
years ( since the college was
opened in 190-1- is that we have
been able to give a good education to 700 students who probably would not have otherwise
received it."
And his efforts seem to be
indicative of the reaction which
has been' coming to college.
During the first year, the enrollment was 325 students. For
the current semester, 540 students
are enrolled. Next year. Dr.
Campbell expects a total of S00
students at attend the two-yecollege.

EWELRY
Phon

266-624- 1

SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Yearly, by mail 17 00

Per copy, from files

$ .10

KERNEL. TELEPHONES
Editor, Executive Editor, Managing
Editor
JJ21
News LVkk. Sports, Women's Editor,
Socials
J320
AdverUsing, Business, Circulation X3l

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Thursday, Nov.

d

black-leathered- ,,

Pin-Mat- es

the girls and the loys and many
have mistaken one for the other
with embarrassing and often violent results.
Rut while Britishers boil at
the defeminization of their women, we on the other side of
the Atlantic are still relatively
safe from such guessing games.
Our youth may have the same
longhair, and when in the throes
of Reatleminia it is often difficult to discern physical features
at all never mind trying to tell
them apart but generally women are women and men are men.
Several years ago when
Courreges attempted to put the
into pants suits and
career-gir- l
bowler hats, toting long black
umbrellas and cowhide attache
cases, most of the feminine
working corps rebelled. The
lounge suits with long flowing
pants held on, but only in gossamer and only by a thread.
The stress in the United States
is definitely
Any man
worth his weejuns wants his woman to look like just that and
herein lies the secret.
Women dress to please the
man or men in their lives and
the men prefer skirts, sweaters,
and dresses.

Perhaps it is a feather in
our cap that even in protest
against their traditional social
roles women have managed to
maintain their femininity and
decorum . . . and while they may
attempt to compete with men in
the job market they do it in
a proven
skirts and sweaters

use the

OSOTZ2B3
ItUi

f

CIASI

FASHIONS

HANDStWNJ
Handsewns are classic favorite

CAMELIA

because they're always
the perfect accessory for
Casual Clothes

TERMS,

LETTER

II

style from Cover Ciri
The world's top
Hand sewn maker . . .

etiaia

.

.

i

THIS

AD DONE BY CHEANEY

OF COURSE

.

$9.98

$4X3
Paddtowftfc
Greek Letters
on 18 chain

$125
Come

ii ind see

our wide select km

om

mm

W ike

SILVERSMITH

JEWELRY

OK GRILL

1000

cowrlmgirl

P.Edw.Villeminot

fraternity.

TO

See our wide selection of

10K COLO

IS

PRICES FROM tlOO

- SORORITY

(
lLAVALIERS
GRCCfit

y

...

e,

FRATERNITY

WW

advantage.

e.

Cherry Watson, a religion
major at Transylvania College,
from Philadelphia, Pa., to Jim
Philpot, senior civil engineering
major from Manchester and a
member of Triangle fraternity.
Betty Jean Grcenwell, Louisville nursing student from Mays-villto Ernie Robbins, sophomore civil engineering major from
Maysville.. and a member of
.Triangle fraternity..
. Linda
Smith , junior social
,
work major from Little Rock,
Ark., and a member of Gamma
Phi Beta sorority, to Richard
Burgess, senior mechanical engineering major from Paducah
and a member of Triangle fraternity.
Judy Payne, sophomore in Arts
and ' Sciences from Paducah, to
John Campbell, senior accounting major from Paducah, and a
member of Alpha Tau Omega

l5-- 3

IT PAYS TO ADVERTISE IN THE KERNEL!

Fads And Fancies
Great Hritain, long the seat
of conserv ative dress, is in a state
of revolution. Tlie Mods, dapper,
twecd-dresseyoung moderns,
and the Rockers,
motorcycle driving, helions, were
at least recognizable from each
other as the extremes of the
"Pepsi Generation." And only
rarely was there a problem of
telling the guys from the girls.
No longer.
"Vive la difference," is fast
disappearing in the British Isles
and on the Continent as more
and more young couples are
dressing alike. . .in HIS clothing!
Haberdashers offer his and her
slacks, shirts, and suits only
slightly modified to the female
hipline.
Many Hritons have remarked
that, from the back at least, there
is no obvious difference between

11,

105 West Main
and

368 Southland Drive

BROWN CALF
RAWHIDE CALF
BLACK

CALF

KIN GO

Rah!
Rah!
Cheers for the Benchwarmer on
brisk cold days! It's a hooded
winner fashioned of wine
Melton Cloth with a crisp plaid
lining. Giant zipper closing. $30
Just one of a collection of
campus coats corduroys,

ml

j

vl I v

shags, suede cloth in green,
sand, red, brown, camel.
From $15

AUNTJ-QUE-

il

The Newness of the Old is captured in these
fresh ankle length cotton print shifts. Puffed
of petal sleeves, lace trims and tucked yokes.
Each style a delight.
12.00
Assorted styles, colors, and sizes
381 S. Umo

THE DOOR TO FASHION
EUCLID AVENUE

lit

S

Acro

from Holmes Hall

* Sonic Like It Cooler

Investment In Future
families. Tims, a vicious circle has
been formed in which poorly cdu- cated parents cannot earn their
own way without depending upon
aid from their children, who are in
turn deprived of their education.
It is true that many high school
graduates, freed from outside obligations, can finance in one way
or another a college education. Hut
most college financial help conies
in scholarships or in government
aid to students majoring in educa-fro-

Earlier this week President
Johnson signal into law a bill
that will provide S2.6 billion in
federal grants, loans, and scholar- ships for students too ioor to carry
on and complete their college edit- cation.
Mr. Johnson called the act "a
new adventure in learning," and a
new adventure it truly is.
The people toward whom Mr.
Johnson's War on Poverty is aimed
almost all suffer, in varyingdegTees,
a lack of education. Many
have not gone farther than the

m

Hon.

What becomes of the persons
who cannot qualify for the scholarships which usually require better
than average standards or who do
not wish to enter the teaching
profession?
The day is rapidly approaching
when a person will be required to
hold a college diploma to qualify
for top career positions. If more
of our young citizens cannot obtain
that diploma, then the entire country will in turn suffer from loss of
their talents.
The $2.6 billion education act
will enable more students Mr.
Johnson estimates that 1,000,000 of
the 1,300,000 high school graduates
who do not enter college will be
able to continue their education
to betterequipthenisclvcs to handle
the increasingly complex industrial,
social, political, and economic
problems of toda and tomorrow.

eighth grade; most have not gone
even that far.
This has been due to the fact
that in most cases the students
have had to drop out of school
to work and help support their

Letters To The Editor

Nine New Points On Old Party
To The Editor:

Unpaid Greeters
Each semester each woman
living in a dormitory is required
to do a certain number of hours
of hostess duty, greeting guests and
answering telephones at the main
desk.
The amount of time each student
must devote to this task varies
with the number of residents in
each housing unit. Rarely does
it amount to more than five or
six hours a semester.
Even so, the duty is an inconvenience to some students.
There is no justification in requiring this service from residents.
They all pay fees to live in the
dormitories. Someone ought to be
hired to fill the hostess position,
a student perhaps.
It seems unfair to impose this
duty on "paying customer" residents of dormitories.
Paid hostesses should be hired
to fill the positions in the evenings,
as they now do in the day.

I'm answering one J. Kevin
Charters' objecHve criticism of my
biased letter concerning the Lexington police.
1. The noisey party occurred
next to a hospital, but the hospital
didn't complain.
After the police arrived, the
party became very quiet.
3. The near-risituation consisted of several students asking a
man and wife if they were injured
by the attendants who harrassed
them.
4. The concerned
knife was
found somewhere in the parking lot
later that night, not at the feet of
the students. (The parking lot is
large.)
5. When asked to leave, the students insisted upon explaining the
2.

ot

situation.
6. The students did complain
earlier about being assaulted. The
police ridiculed and ignored this
complaint.
7. A policeman who helped make
the arrests visited me a week ago to

The Kentucky Kernel
ESTABLISHED

The South's Outstanding College Daily
University of Kentucky

1894

THURSDAY, NOV.
W'ALTtH

Ijnua Mills,

Exeixitive Editor

Kl.nm.th

Sally Sixll, ,Vmi Editor
Cay Cimi, Women

$

Chant,

Culls,

Editor-in-Chie-

f

Ktsstin

Hoskiss, Managing Editor

Axsmiate Editor
Judy Ckimiam. Assniate

IlbNHY HOSLNTHAL, SfHJTtS

Page Editor

11. 19C5

Editor

Strut Editor

Makcaklt Hailly,

Arts Editor

Business Staff

Tom Finnic, Advertising Manager

Mahvin Huncatk, Circulation Manager

discuss my letter. He agreed that
the arrests were unjust and said his
superiors acted "stupidly". He ex- pressed his sympathy for the
students and explained that he had
to follow orders.
8. Judge Maloney dismissed the
case after hearing only one of the
eight defense witnesses.
9. Perhaps Mr. Charters can ex. ."chaining
plain how. . ."sit-ins,oneself to sewers,". . .and "groups
who dismiss law and order without
a second thought". . . .are relevant
to what happened that night.
I hope this biased information
fills the gaps for Mr. Charters and
that his selective perception never
again interferes with his overwhelming objectivity.
ALLEN RUBIN
Graduate Student in Psycfiologu
".

Racial Identification
Still Requested Here
To The Etlitor:

In your editorial "Is This UK's
We Hope Not!"
Image . . .?
which appeared in the Nov. 3rd
edition of The Kernel, you cite
several areas of change in respect
to human rights at the University
of Kentucky. One important change
removal
has not been made-t- he
of the blank to state your race
on class schedules at registration
each semester.

fication papers such as drivers'
licenses, but to require it on every
semesters' schedule cards is not
necessary and reflects the discriminatory policies of the past. I
would extend the argument to say
that this is an unnecessary question
on all University forms including
the applications for admission. UK
is the third school that I have
attended; it is the first school that
has asked me to give my race.
For those students who are
offended by having to state their
race and for those students who
see it as a degradation of the University, I would suggest leaving this
space blank or writing in the word
"HUMAN".
TERRENCE MARSH
Graduate Student In Zoology

Kernels
Thinking in its lower grades in

'j'w"iiney,amito
a

its
poetry.

Havelock FMis
A man will not swallow more
beliefs than he can digest,
Havclock FMis

"I'heie is a certain blend of

rage, integrity, character and
PiiHple which has no satisfactory
dictionary name but has been called
different things at different times
indifferent countries. Our American
It is reasonable to be asked to name for it is 'guts.'"
Lonl Adamic
give your race on certain identi- -

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Thursday, Nov.

nt

1

5

11, 19f5- -5

Special Session May
Save NC Accreditation
By WILLIAM GRANT
RALEIGH, N.C. (CPS) In an attempt to save North Carolina's
d
colleges and universities from a threatened loss of
accreditation, Gov. Dan Moore has called a special session of the
state's General Assembly for Nov. 15.
The issue is a controversial
tees. The association consequent- speaker ban law which was ly has threatened to withdraw the
passed in the closing minutes of accreditation of all North Carothe 1963 session of the Assembly lina
colleges and
and came as a surprise to every- universities.
The association which has
one, especially to the state's educators.
been planning its move for much
of the two-yea- r
Gov. Moore hopes the legisperiod since the
lature will have amended that law went on the books, meets
law by then or at least will have in Richmond, Va., beginning
convinced the association that it Nov. 28.
intends to amend the law during
this session.
The public hearings on the
law produced strong suggestions
for compromise in an effort to
remove the threat before the association meets. However, throughnn
out the hearings the American
Legion said it wanted the ban
to remain, even if it meant loss
of accreditation.
The strongest voice urging
compromise came from Secretary
of Commerce Luther H. Hodges,
e GERMANY
a former North Carolina governor. Hodges urged both sides
o IRELAND
"to give a little for the good of
the state." Further, he said the
o SPAIN
speaker's ban in its present state
poses a threat not only to the
o MEXICO
state's academic accreditation
but to industrial development
o FRANCE
and economic advancement as
o JAPAN
well.
The Southern Association of
o SCOTLAND
Colleges and Schools, the acfor the South,
crediting agency
o GREECE
has said the law amounts to
political interference with the
o AUSTRIA
responsibilities of boards of trus- -

t.

state-supporte-

i

state-supporte- d

(

,

II.- -

"CAPITOL OF
THE WORLD"

ti'.t I,,, 1

jte:iMK;

fcn

i

A

a

.

Heynsx New Man At Berkeley

By II. NEIL BERKSON
The Collegiate Press Service
BERKELEY, Calif. (CPS)-"T- he
best thinn about his university is that it alienates so many

people."
"There

is no place in the
United States more exciting than
this campus; there is no place
or institution offering more varied
experiences; there is nothing like
Berkeley."
"Few Berkeley students will
remember their alma mater with
fond romantic images because
Berkeley is not that kind of
school."

NEWS ANALYSIS:
series.
of a two-pa- rt

Second

When Roger Heyns left the
academic affairs
at the University of Michigan this
summer to become Berkeley's
chancellor, the above attitudes
are what he let himself in for.
Heyns, who has turned down
several offers of presidencies in
the past few years (including,
it is rumored, the Ford Foundation) came because he believed
he . could get things done.
Whether he can or not remains
to be seen.
Heyns has not had the usual
"grace" period accorded a new
official.
Some of his actions
have already created a stir.
Among them:
1.
He has brought in four
faculty members to serve as his
top aides, three of whom were
active supporters of the FSMlast
year.
2. He has issued one new set
of student activity regulations
the old regulations set off last
year's demonstrations. After some
initial criticisms, no one has
shown much concern with the
rules, even when Heyns has enforced unpopular aspects of them.
By and large, they have not
inhibited campus activity. Stu- cy

dents, faculty and administration
at Berkeley all seem to have an
obsession with rules which must
seem rather strange to Heyns,
coming from relatively rule-les- s
Ann Arbor. He is in the process
of having yet more rules a
"final" set drawn up by a
student - faculty - administration
committee.
3. He has offered an appointment to Eli Katz, a Cerman
professor fired by Heyn's predecessor, Edward Strong, for
refusing to discuss his political
activities. Katz had been strongly
recommended for tenure by his
department, and his firing caused
a controversy.
4.
He has gone out of his
way to meet with students.
5. He has moved firmly to
assert his control of the Berkeley
campus vis a vis the statewide
Obuniversity administration.
servers say that until this year
University of California President
Clark Kerr, a former Berkeley
chancellor, actually made up
most of the campus decisions.
Some of last year's FSM
leaders are nevertheless suspicious of Heyns.
Beyond that problem the
major question remains how
much of a grasp can he get on
this sprawling institution where
the problems range from undergraduate education to the handling of millions of dollars of
research money. Here is his own
perspective of his institution,
given in a speech to the student
body in September:
These characteristics of Berkeley today the energy, the pluralism and the will to renewal
are already opening new perspectives.
One of the reasons for the
crisis in higher education generally has been the discrepancy
between the nature of new knowledge and the needs of new stu- -

iVMtt

m)&(&&

Tarn

HUM Mm
QCTuTHITi

Qltarro'

Will Dunn Drug
Corner of

S. Limo

and Maxwell

The College Store
FOUNTAIN
COSMETICS

DELIVERY SERVICE
DRUGS

AiDum

dents.
The advancement of
learning has demanded even more
intensive specialization. But the
new generation of students have
sought for a form of learning
with clearer relevance to their
personal lives and the problems
of modern society. Our university
has become the classic focus of
this tension by virtue of our
very strengths. Berkeley's greatest assets have been the scholarly power of its faculty and
the vitality and ability of its
students . . . .Our character as a
university depends on integrating
our two assets in a reawakened
sense that we are a community
of learning."

From

Heyns has yet to enunciate his
goals more clearly, however.
Moreover, he has stated that he
thinks Berkeley can become larger
than it already is.

o ITALY
o FINLAND
o SWEDEN

for$j.10
SHIRTS . . .

But the university is seeking
change at both the extracurricular
and curricular levels. One of
Heyn's new assistants, philosophy professor John Searle,
wants to give students complete
authority over their lives out-- .
side the classroom. Searle, one of
the strongest FSM supporters
among the faculty last year, declared upon his appointment:
"To me this is a case of put up
or shut up. I have been critical
of some of the university's procedures in the past, and this appointment gives me the opportunity to make suggestions...
necessary to make the university
run more effectively."

That you

EGYPT

will be

o
o
o
o

proud to wear!

Girls BLOUSES
That you

will be

proud to wear!

ONE DAY SERVICE
DRY CLEANING BY
PROFESSIONALS
AT
REASONABLE
PRICES

Emergency Service if Requested

CROLLEY

CLEANERS
116

VY.

Inc.
Maxwell

255-431-

KENNEDY

3

p

Just $5.00 a mile
Saturday or Sunday
let HERTZ put you
mo unvci o ouau

1966

INDIA
NORWAY

M$2.98 S$3.98

This weekend rent a new compact Corvair from Hertz-He- rtz
special low weekend rates are easy on your wallet!

252-614-

ENGLAND
TURKEY

WHERE ELSE?

rWant to get away from it all?
Call

CHINA

BOOK
STORE
405 South Lime

6

hertz

1 lit NT A CAM

I

I

(

O

I

I

ENGINEERING GRADUATES

The Inland Steel Company, East Chicago, Indiana, invites you
to investigate our many career opportunities. Consult the
specific job descriptions in the pocket of our brochure. Our
representative will be on your campus on Thursday, November
18th. For an appointment, contact Mrs. Katherine Kemper.
INLAND STEEL COMPANY