xt70rx937z9v https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt70rx937z9v/data/mets.xml Lexington, Kentucky (Fayette County) University of Kentucky Alumni Association 1920 v. : ill. ; 28 cm. Quarterly, Publication suspended 1922 and resumed with v. 1, no. 1 (May 1929); v. 5, no. 9 (May 1933) not published; issues for v. 37, no. 2-v. 40, no. 1 (spring 1966-spring 1969) incorrectly numbered as v. 38, no. 2-v. 43, no. 1; v. 40 (1969) complete in 3 no. journals  English [Lexington, Ky. : University of Kentucky Alumni Association, Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. Kentucky alumnus University of Kentucky. Kentucky alumni 2002- Kentucky alumnus monthly Kentucky alumnus, 1920 text Kentucky alumnus, 1920 1920 2012 true xt70rx937z9v section xt70rx937z9v J
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    Y1   THE KENTUCKY ALUMN US `
     if ‘  ’ U
-7 ·      °—"VOL. XI. MARCH, 1920. Number 1 P
.Q   **  v  ii . ~ ‘
;   Qi ` E
if;     c0NtrENTs. ;-
I. .'v**'      ; — ·  
   1 Editorial Comment .............................................................................,.... ,, 3 A  
¤._,iE_;€i&$;?§i`F  xr  
   it GENERAL- i
_- ;._ ’,;_;*5j:];'L  ("· {
  ;  Dr. McVey’s Biennial Report ........................................................ 6 g
    Greetings From Our President ...................................................... 12  
    The Women at the University ....................,.............................i... 13  
    l The Kgutugky ]\’[@,]]]Ol‘i3,l Building ....................... . .......... . ........ . ....     -
    Thirtieth Biennial Convention of Kappa Alpha ............................ 14 g
    A Plea to the Alumni of the American Universities ...................... 15  
   ?°_V Re-instatement of War Risk Insurance ........................r............... 16 `
    ` "Little Theatre" Fully Equipped Playhouse .................................. 17
   7 U. of K. Now Accepted for Graduate Work ...........................,........ 18 _
  `   Great Find Credited to University Men ........................................ 19
   .· . Advisory Committee Entertain Students ....,................................. - 19 .
  ’ * · _ ·
   A. Lecture Course in Blue Grass Towns .......................................... 19
   Q` _ Extension Division Distributes Educational Films ...................... 19 ` 4
   l· _ ·
   * STUDENT ACTIVITIES—Athlet1cs .......................,.............,............,..,...... 21 ‘
    Fraternities ........................................................................,.......,............... 24
     ¤Z Alumni Notes ...........................................................................................,.. 2m; .
*<·‘%;€. " ,_j I  ,-
   3 Lost List .................................................................................................... 29  
    Information for the Alumni Directory .............,...................................... 31   V
        JT
   L Dues for the Year 1919-1920 .................................,.................................. 2:2  
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,_ ‘ ‘   _ OFFICERS OF THE ASSOCIATION  
  L   _ Alumni Representatives on Board of Trustees  
  1   PHILIP P. JOHNSON, JR., Lexington, Ky.  
  — I   ‘ J. I. LYLE, New York City. »  _»
    — W. H. GRADY, Louisville, Ky.   A
° A     A GENERAL ASSOCIATION  {
» .   ‘ MRS. CHAS. J. SMITH, President, Lexington, Ky.  j-
i `   ` HERBERT GRAHAM, Vice—President, Frankfort, Ky.  ’§ A
_ I     S. B. MARKS, Secretary—Treasurer, Lexington, Ky.  
·   i S. B. MARKS, Editor, The Alumnus, Lexington, Ky.  
A .   i EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE  
--   . W. E. FREEMAN, Chairman, Lexington, Ky.  
'   ` FRANK BATTAILE, Lexington, Ky.  
_   3 E. B. WEBB, Lexington, Ky.  `
‘   · LULA LOGAN, Lexington, Ky.  
Q ii   T. *1*. JONES, Lexington, Ky.  
C.   p  `_ GEORGE BROCK, London, Ky.   _
;     CLASS SECR-ETARIES  
_     1919—C. E. PLANCK, Lexington Herald, Lexington, Ky. ig 
_   gg   1918—— 2 
  _ 1917—  Z;V
    1916—ELSIE HELLER, Y. M. C. A., Richmond, Va., and L. H. NELSON.  ‘
· _     Dept. of Agri., Raleigh, N. C.  
J g   1915—CLYDE TAYLOR.  ;
  ’_ 1914-R. C. DABNEY, Miller Rubber Company, Akron, Ohio.  "g
,   ,·‘_ > 19134MABEL POLLITT, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Ky.  
    1912—J. R. DUNCAN, H. W. Johns-Manville Company, New York City.  
n     1911—OLLINE CRUICKSHANK, Lexington, Ky.  
5. A ` 1910-D. V. TERRELL, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Ky. lf: 
. i   1909——P. L. BLUMENTHAL, Babcock-Blumenthal Laboratories, Luck-  
L 1, ij.; awana, N. Y.  
  fi 1908—FRANK BATTAILE, Lexington, Ky.  _
`   '_   1907—L. E. HILLENMEYER, Lexington, Ky.  
    1906—ANNA WALLIS, 326 Aylesford Place, Lexington, Ky.  jj
.     1905—HARRY EDWARDS, R. F. D., Lexington, Ky. ’· 
l Y` ,1   1904—W. E. FREEMAN, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Ky.  
` T     1903——MARGUERlTE McLAUGHLIN, 226 E. Maxwell St., Lexington. Ky  
    1902—T. J. BARR, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Ky.  
S     1901—G. H. HALLEY, Cleary-White Construction Co., Chicago, lll. A; 
t QQ, 1900--L. K. FRANKEL, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Ky.  
4 ‘ A, .-·,- ; {C 1899—GEORGE ROBERTS, Experiment Station, Lexington, Ky.  {
J Q,] 1898-—CHAS. L. STRAUS, Lexington, Ky.  
` _   1897——MARY E. CLARKE, Lexington, Ky.  
· " Qi 1896—J. I. LYLE, 39 Cortlandt St., New York City.  
O   1895—MARY L. DIDLAKE, Experiment Station, Lexington, Ky.  
-   1894--MRS. P. F. KESHEIMER, Madison Place, Lexington, Ky.  
. `   1893—D. S. ROBERTS, West Point, Ky.  I
li} 1892 and 1891-(To be selected.)  
`   1890——CHAS. R. BROCK, Denver, Colorado.  {
· if 1889 to 1869—A. M. PETER, Experiment Station, Lexington, Ky.  
r ‘ . ·    .5:

 ‘ ’ h · .:T
  ,  1 _ .
»·i  A I g
ii;  is PUBLISHED BI-MoNTHLY—SEI>TEMBER, NOVEMBER, JANUARY, MARCH A
  MAY AND JULY OF EACH YEAR—BY THE ALUMNI Asso-
  . CIATION on THE UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY,
¢g  AT LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY, E
{  Entered as second-class matter September 28, 1916, at the post-omce at Lexington, E
  Kentucky, under the Act of March 3, 1879. E
Fg; THE SUBSCRIPTION PRICE FOR THE KENTUCKY ALUMNUS IS $1.00 PER , t
Qi YEAR; TO ALUMNI, INCLUDING DUES TO THE Asso- F
ef;.  CIATION, $2.00 PER YEAR. F
We  t
  The Kentucky Alumnus is the oflicial publication of the Alumni Association. It is  
  issued bi-monthly by the Association under the direction of the Executive Com-  
  mittee in the interest of the Association and of the University. It therefore  
  represents the sentiment and policy of the Alumni organization. _-
ff    I Z
  The Edior—in-Chief is appointed by the Executive Committee of the Alumni Associa-  
  tion and the Associate Editors are the Class Secretaries of the various classes and §
  the Presidents of the Alumni Clubs. {
     
JELSON.    
  EJ · 1 C t
  ltOTlCl OTTlITl€Tlt »
Y.  
Jrk City.   The editor wishes to express to all loyal sons and
 { A New Editor daughters thanks for their support to the Association
Qi  and to the Alumnus, and can only express regret at the
s, Lack-  Q fact that all are not so loyal. For the past many years a little body of ‘ ·
  a few alumni have been looking out for and carrying the Association over
  the hard spots and we need the help of the whole body right now and
 _f° need it bad. I
  At the present writing there are 250 alumni who are registered upon I j
it  the duty done side of the ledger, truly a pitiful minority, with 2,000 who
  should be there. ,
;t°u‘ Kl  ; The Sec.—Treas.-Editor job is little but a thankless one, not even LV
1   6110ugh money to buy firewood for the stove and to have a part time clerk T
‘ U ‘  Z. » to keep the records in order to say nothing of a stenographer. Such a.   I
Y·   Goudition is inexcusable and we do not see where we will arrive, for Y0uI‘S  
y· E,  truly can not devote his time nor can anyone else do so indeinitely, and  
  W6 0111}* took the job in an endeavor to try to stimulate enough interest L
  and collect enough money to put the Secretaryship and Editorship into   _
V .  the hands of a paid and competent person. Could such an end be ob-  
·   tained the Association would amount to something and not before.  
'   These are plain words but they state plain facts.  
  There will be published elsewhere a blank form for the convenience A  
  of EDYOIIG who might wish to join the "Contemptible Little A1‘my." F
.y. is   
  R
  B ‘ 1
·   .... . _   , . . A A . . .. , .   ~.,·‘·»`

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•"f is  I _ . g .  
A .   . 4 THE KENTUCKY ALUMNUS.  A
f` A `   A. Governor Morrow has always taken a keen  
  i     The New Chairman interest in affairs of the University and we can  
  ~ .   ` of the Board safely predict a continued and active growth  
  p for the University under his guidance.  
, '   n The Alumnus wishes to congratulate Mr. Morrow upon the per- 5, 
  c   _ sonnel of "The Board of Control" for the coming four years. The ap-  
.g   _ _ · pointment of such a Board puts the State upon a level never before ap-  A
`Y ·7 § As proached in the management of our institutions.  
- · if  
` ·.   _ Published elsewhere, in part, is this report, which  ‘
»   The President’s _ most concisely and emphatically sets forth the needs  Q
A jj   Biennial Report of the University, and we beg of you to give it your  ‘~
~   . most careful attention.  *
    The advance made at the University since Dr. McVey’s presidency  Z·
{ {   stands upon its merits, but one can readily see from his report how the Q 
  `. lack of funds for buildings and for administration is holding up this  
g 5 "Q  great work.  
· Y   ;._ We of Kentucky or any other State cannot expect to have an institu-  
’   rj tion of front rank when our teachers are paid a bare living wage, for no  
    man can be at his highest eiiiciency when he must constantly be striving  
  Q . to meet the necessities of everyday life. Let us realize these facts and   .
. `E   . n take steps to meet them for in our educational institutions lie our whole  *
»·   J strength as a State and as a nation.  
  v'_`  — One must not be unmindful of the fact that the  
T.   `_ The Call of the Government is constantly calling for additional sub-  
‘ ‘ 3   Government scriptions to the Thrift Stamp and Treasury Sav-  
A. A Ag ing Certificates. If the Government did not need  {
~ ;   this money they would not ask you to buy these securities and it is the  Q
I     `»_' Q duty of all to assist the Government at this and all times of stress from  
      any cause whatsoever.  
‘   Y ` * The Liberty Bond has thoroughly demonstrated to us the value of a  `
  j Hrst class investment over high or even excessive taxation and if such  
S ;_     securities are not bought there is but one answer-—TAXES.  
. Q.     There is being conducted through the World Trades Club  
{   The Metric of San Francisco an extensive campaign for the adoption  
    System of the Metric System as the standard of weights and  
» ?` QQ; measures of the United States and thus helping to give  ;
_ i QA to the world a much needed standardization. A great many States have  j
· { V   gone on record approving such a measure and in a short time we believe  _
3   it will be a fact and will greatly enhance trade relations between countries.  
_ "‘_{i There is no movement which deserves a more heartY  
G gi The Boy endorsement and support than the Scout Movement. To be  
_   Scout a scout a boy must, to speak succinctly, be a little man and  §I—
‘ _ {5,; there is nothing so valuable to a boy as an early schooling  
,   in the art of being a man, it teaches him to be independent, to be con-  Q
· A   siderate of others, to love and to understand nature and some of hel'  
T’ , .· In  =j

  .  4
j THE KENTUCKY ALUMNUS. 5  
a. keen Z?  mysteries, it puts him on a footing of understanding with his male parent E
we can -i  and above all teaches him those things that a boy should be in his relation l A
growth  p. to his associates and to those with whom he comes in touch. .
  The boy is the potential manhood of tomorrow and it is the duty of
he per-   everyone to strive to make this manhood worthy of its inheritance.  
Phe ap-   i
fore ap-   We have received from Dr. Henry Van Dyke a letter E
  The Needs setting forth the dire state of the city of Lille. We all E
Qi of Lille know what Lille is and what she was before the Hun F.
» which   invasion that tore out her vitals and all but absolutely  
-6 needs ij? destroyed her. Now she is asking for funds to re-establish her University g
it YOU?   and Hospitals. Her needs are great, her requests most modest and your E
  support could be given to no more worthy cause. p f‘
tsideiliy   Dr. Van Dyke’s letter is published in part elsewhere.  
row e   ;·
UP this  `· - One of the most praiseworthy post-war services having §
fi  Kappa Alpha occurred in Lexington was the Memorial Service con- {
msmw   Convention ducted by the Kappa Alpha Fraternity, during their $·
» for H0 Q?  Thirtieth Biennial Convention, in honor of those of  
Striving   their number who had paid the "Supreme Sacriiice" during the late war. E
mts and   The Services were held in Christ Church Cathedral and were a most fit  
Y Whole   Memorial.  
  The fund for the erection of a Memorial Building upon
hat the   The Memorial the Campus is still far from being complete and we
ual Sub-   Building urge all alumni to send their subscriptions at the earli-
lry Saw   est possible time, as such a cause deserves the support
_°t_ Head   of all and we feel sure no alumnus will intentionally lose the opportunity
251;;*;   to subscribe to this tuna. »
lue of a  3
if such   `
ies Club   ,
adoption   Q
nts and   Q
to s1v¤  _     i
tes l18.V6   "   j‘
z believe   ¤"‘· X \_ g
ountries.   L
2 hearty T   ‘
t. To be    
man and    
nchooling    
l be con-  A  
e of her  I  
Ji   ` ` w

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.§ _ E,   . E, 
j     6 THE KENTUCKY ALUMNUS.  _
J I  fi '  E
      ` ` 0 )$¢>$()10$(l$0H01()$0K|>$()1<>Z¢>$|)$(|$()K()1010$(•3  `»
I at .  .
    I   GENERAL  
. .     V ` O: D1€>1<)1()1()1l)1<)$<)$l)j(>$ll$010K010$()$0$( :•  S,.
    DR. McVEY’S BIENNLAL REPORT.  
   . (In Part Only.)  Q
»   " V if
  __ 2 The Needs of the University  
_   g There is no use disguising the fact that the necessities of the Univer-  
;   _   sity are great, especially if is it to represent adequately the educational  
. 3 _   requirements of a spirited people like those that dwell in the Common-  F
  ~  wealth of Kentucky. What seemed adequate two years ago for main-  
` ;     { tenance and construction of buildings for a five year period is now sufficient  
  ‘   to keep only the institution up to its present development without addi-  
    g § tional growth. The University is faced with the care and instruction of a  1
.     rapidly growing student body, the requirements of better salaries, new  
1   ' ' buildings and repairs. Since the Legislature met in 1918, a new world  `
` { Y  has been created. The question is really, how far Kentucky is going to  Q
    meet the problems created by a changed world. A brief consideration  _
  _. i of income and student attendance will show what the University may be  5
f  j expected to face. When and how shall the University take care of its  
_ '_ ,  present student body and get ready for the larger attendance of the next  E
. A . ten years?   A
°   ii  The matter may be put simply. The University has had no general  Q
` i; Q  building appropriations since 1904-1908, when about $400,000 was ap-  
  ·.  propriated in the four years. At that time, the student body consisted  
  Q of 412 colege students and 293 other students, a total of 705. In 1910,  
‘     there were 582 college students and 221 other students, a total of 803.  
` `.; it The student body began to increase, with the growth of high schools  
` [ l   bringing the figures in 1915 to 915 college students, 564 other students,  
.     a total of 1,479. In 1818-19, the total college student body reached  {_
S 5   1,179, and other students, largely S. A. T. C., 1,156, a total of 2,335.  {
» if  This year, 1919-20, the college student body will be the largest in the  i
_ ‘ _~ f_  history of the University. In seventeen years time, 1900 to 1917, the  ;
V Q;  college students have increased 377 per cent. In the past two years, thi? _ 
  increase of the same group has been 23 per cent. Turning now to income. _, 
I { In 1900, the income of the General Fund was $76,991.34. This arose to . 
` `   $107,631.03 in 1904. In 1910, the General Fund income was $132,537.00  I_
  It arose to $220,000 in 1917. By 1924 the University of Kentucky would  i`
—   have no less than 1,600 colege students and as many more short coursé.  
f _   summer school and other attendants, if the conditions permitted it. This  Z
Q year, not less than 200 students were turned away and as many more did  
y·~ .;  Z-

  - THE KENTUCKY ALUMNUS. _ 7   .
 \`v not come because of uncertainty about board and room and the high
..0..,;   prices asked for them. A grave responsibility, in consequence, rests A
1  u on the State to meet such a situation and especially so in view of the
 _ P
1  declining value of the dollar which has reduced the actual value or the
{  income provided two years ago.  
, ;¤.  i
  (a) What Other States Are Doing  
  It will be seen that among the southern states, Virginia, West Viz-  
 1 ginia, Tennessee, North and South Carolina, Mississippi and Texas sur-  
  passed Kentucky in the per capita contributions to university support.
‘   According to this table, the amount so contributed was 26 cents per  
  capita, placing Kentucky in the forty—iirst place. As an actual fact, the  
  table gives too large a per capita to Kentucky if extension funds are ex— 5
juivep .31  Cllldéd.  
aticggi   Rank of States as to per capita receipts of higher educational institutions  
mHI;m_   supported by the State, Normal Schools not included. (Bureau of ¥
lmcient V?  Education Bulletin, 1919, No. 41.) . _»
t ad;H`   ` 1. Nevada ............................ $2.43 26. Massachusetts ................ $0.65  
on 0 8  y 2. Arizona ........,................... 1.90 27. Tennessee ........................ .58 E_
es, new  `_ 3. Wyoming ........................ 1.62 28. Florida ............................ .55  
, World   4. Montana .......................... 1.60 29. Ohio ................................ .53 _·
_   5. Utah ................................ 1.55 30. Illinois ............................ .48
Omg tc   6. South Dakota .................. 1.52 31. Maine .............................. .48
erati011  . 7. Iowa ................................ 1.38 32. West Virginia .................. .48 ·
bg $1  8. Idaho .............................. 1.33 33. South Carolina .................. .43
may   ‘ s N b k 133 34 v· g· as 43
Q of its   10. Cglorrzsdoa ........................ 1.26 35. C:)1;u;g;ticH£ ....................... .35
he next .2 . 11. California ........................ 1.21 36. Mississippi ...................... .43
·Z  12. Michigan ........................ 1.20 37. Missouri .......................... .33 l
·  13. Minnesota ...................... 1.20 38. Maryland ........................ 30
eneral .
g   14. Oregon ............................ 1.19 39. New York ........................ .29
Vas ap`   15. Kansas ............................ 1.14 40. North Carolina ................ .29 ,
insisted ._  16. Wisconsin ........................ 1.08 41. Kentucky ........................ .26 ‘
1910,   17. New Mexico ...................... 1.04 42. Rhode Island .................... .25 .
if 8034  _ 18. Washington .................... .99 43. Georgia ........................... . .24
  19. North Dakota .................... .92 44. Alabama .......................... .21 ‘
Schools   20. Vermont .......................... .89 45. Arkansas ........................ .20 5
;udents,  . 21. Delaware .......................... .87 46. New Jersey ........................ .15 }
reached   22. New Hampshire .............. .77 47. Pennsylvania .................. .12  
, 2 335  ·_ 23. Texas .............................. .70 48. Louisiana ........................ .09 ff
· _’   24. Indiana ............................ .68 —— '
I 111 thg   25. Oklahoma, ,,...,,,.,.,,,,.......,. .66 Average for U. S ................ $0.80 Q
17, the {  _ A  
srs, the   Z`
income.  Q.  
arose to  ·   `
,537.00.   . R
y Would _j»   
course, if   
c. rms   ;;
lore did gf   
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   i 3  ». lt i
I i ii  i
2 2 Er r I
Y =   I   8 THE KmN1·UcKY ALUMNUs. _
A *     2
‘ ·     Value of State University plants.——Covering the value of grounds, build.  ’
  »   I j ings, library, apparatus, machinery and furnit1u·e in 1916-17. (Based 5
1   it on the Federal Education Bureau Bulletin No. 55, 1917.)  _
. I ‘     1. California ............ $13,584,432 23. Delaware State Col..$1,423,129 lv
‘ T7 i 2. Minnesota ............ 10,681,075 24. Georgia ................ 1,375,000 Z
   1 3. New York, Cornell 9,534,854 25. West Virginia ...... 1,281,085  
. »   C 4. Wisconsin .............. 8,128,346 26. North Carolina ...... 1,222,675  
    5. Michigan .............. 7,546,821 27. Kentucky ............ 1,185,542  ·
    6. Illinois .................. 6,556,659 28. Oregon ................. 1,043,702 E 
~ §§  § , 7. Ohio State ............ 6,296,368 29. Louisiana ............ 970,574 {
»·   1 8. Iowa ...................... 4,141,408 30. Idaho .................... 965,606  _
gg  I‘ 9. Missouri ................ 3,982,525 31. Maine .................. 948,337 ,
_ 5*3   10. Nebraska .............. 3,153,174 32. Nevada ................ 918,220 j 
    11. Penn.State College 2,802,713 33. North Dakota ....... 904,997 ,
Z`?   12. Washington .......... 2,740,209 34. Oklahoma ............ 884,713 _
v_; n .. 13. Texas .................... 2,555,191 35. Wyoming ............ 865,000  _Q
_  " 14. Virginia ........... . .... 2,297,059 36. Utah ..................... 757,812 ;_ 
`§  _~ 15. Kansas .............. 1,2,000,000 37. South Dakota ........ 750,000  
5, ; 16. Indiana ................ 1,681,600 38. Arkansas ............. 718,000  ‘
  . 1 17. New Jersey,Rutgers 1,660,979 39. Arizona ................ 708,500  Q_
'   -.  18. Colorado .............. 1,515,000 40. Florida ................ 698,000  
    19. Vermont ............... 1,511,222 41. Mississippi ........... 536,000  ’
  i` 20. Tennessee ............ 1,458,993 42. R. I. State College 485,335  
  g 21. Alabama .............. 1,439,318 43. Montana .............. ’ 430,252  9
—     22. South Carolina ...... 1,425,004 44. New Mexico ......... 250,426  ’
    Another table shows the investments made in University plants.  
·     It will be observed that only three southern states have a smaller  1
A ’ f .   investment than Kentucky. These are Louisiana, Mississippi and Arkansas.  e
{   Our neighbors on the north have in Illinois an investment of $6,556,659;  -
. e ~ 3 Indiana with Purdue University, where Engineering and Agriculture are  
. - . E taught, an investment of $4,000,000; Ohio, $6,296,368. These iigures are  
`j ` i;_  now outgrown, and should be increased by many hundreds of thousands,  `
, 1 Q, f  while Kentucky’s investmenbhas been almost stationary for several years.  
    i  
{     (b) Requirements for Agriculture and Engineering ‘ 
` l   _;_  The great need of the University is additional funds because of it 
· i Q changed conditions. These funds are required for the payment of better  ‘
_ ff' ;  salaries and the increase of departments, particularly in agriculture and ° 
__ It  engineering. The situation in the College of Agriculture has reached { 
  [   such a point that it can hardly be expected that the teachers in that col-  7
-   lege can be maintained largely from federal funds. The Experiment Station  ._
` JY   also should have additional land. The farm of 240 acres is insufficient  t
V _ ?;-  for the requirements of the University. While some progress has been  
A · {Y made in the purchase of livestock, still it is essential that the animals fof  —
—   instructional purposes should be largely increased.  
_ .   For twenty—five years now the College of Engineering has been  .
Q»_  getting on with inadequate equipment. Many of the buildings are HH-  
_ _   satisfactory, and much of the equipment is obsolete. The college has ,, 
‘   had the reputation of turning out capable young men. In fact, every mall  ;

 . i "
. ‘ r c
 ‘ · THE KENTUCKY ALUMNUS. 9   l
  who has graduated from it in the past several years has found a position E
build'  ` waiting for him. The Alumni have reached positions of influence in the E
Basel  ° industrial world. If it is to continue to hold this reputation, it is essential —
 _ that considerable sums of money be spent in the purchase of equipment.
   i. (c) Housing of Students E
31,085 if For some time the University has been confronted with the problem .
    of housing students. The erection of Patterson Hall relieved this some-  
43;.702 I what in the care of girls, but the increase of their number has now filled  
70,574 5 that building to overflowing, and forced the University to iease other  
65,606   buildings in the neighborhood. There yet remains other provisions  
    to be made for the young women. With the changing of the old and new ·  
’ ;_ dormitories to recitation buildings, the men of the University were left FQ
    without dormitory provision. These buildings were unsatisfactory, and  
    so impressed were the Probe Committee with their inadequacy, that they  
> t recommended the destruction of the buildings. The amount required to  
    make them into dormitories with proper plumbing facilities, would have  
08,500 Q  cost more than they were worth. Consequently, the Trustees thought  
98,000  . best to use them with some repairs, for much needed recitation buildings. A »
   j The City of Lexington has been able to take care of the boys thus far, and  
301252   many of the people have opened their homes to them, but this year the §
50,426 _ situation has become much more difficult, due to the increase in the num- Q
  ber of students and the high prices being asked for rooms. It is hoped I.
tS· VZ  that the Legislature will be able to see the importance of this matter and .
xmaller 4. make provision for the housing of students.
ransas. if
6,659;   (d) Matter of Salaries »
ire are  ‘ The payment of adequate salaries is always fundamental in the de—
res are T velopment of a faculty. The increase in the cost of living has made this 6 ,
isands,  i more important than ever before, and the University has begun to feel
years. . the effect of it. The War has made a great demand for trained men, and
 · the result has been that the University of Kentucky, like other institu— 1
  tions, has sufered a good deal in the withdrawal of men into commercial .
{ activities. The salaries paid in business are higher than those in the .
use Ot Q  University, and this situation is likely to become more acute, unless some—
better thug is done in the matter of the payment of salaries. It cannot be urged QZ
Ye and too strongly that the men of a faculty make a University. Kentucky _
`eeenen — must have the best men attainable for her youth. She cannot be satisfied {4
let een ; with any less. To bring such men to the State will require greater ex-  
Station ·f  Dcuditures for salaries. Besides the problem of recruiting the staff is the Q
ttnetent g additional one of paying adequate salaries to the men already on the  
is been   faculties. Something must be done to increase salaries which now stand  
lets for  _ at an average of $2,500 for full professors and $1,800 for assistant pro- { .
 . fessors. E'
s been  · ‘f
; (e) Other Needs . ¤
tre un- _, F
gg has  t Reference has already been made to housing facilities for the stu-  
ry msu   d€¤tS. If some start could be made upon the matter, so that dormitories  
{ tt
 ~. {G;

 = v " %· Q. ·
. E ly ` ‘
2 ‘ -   A 10 THE KENTUCKY ALUMNUs. v
  A N:  Q might be built, this part of the diiiiculty with which the University is ‘
A   A 3 confronted could be fairly met. ,
I ‘   §   Another need of the University is new buildings for instruction pur-  
  T poses. The Chemistry Department is housed in two buildings; one of  
»   j them very old, and the other inadequate. Chemistry has a new import- _
. AI;  ¥ ance in America since the War. Formerly, we depended upon Germany i
AQ   ,  for many chemical products. That way is no longer open. The University  
`   J must be prepared to train men in this great Held. The equipment is  
_ Z   i, insufficient to do it adequately, while the housing of the department in two g
A ,     buildings handicaps the efforts of the departmental staff to get results. __
.    i Our State has a vast coal area that is now undergoing rapid development. 2
    S The University has been in close touch with the industry for many years, 2
A     but it should render more assistance to the growth. Hence larger faclli- ;—
A Q_ 5  ties should be provided for instruction in mining engineering, so that  A
[ Y Q. Kentucky's young men may be trained at the Un