xt70rx93b447 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt70rx93b447/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19701001  newspapers sn89058402 English  This digital resource may be freely searched and displayed.  Permission must be received for subsequent distribution in print or electronically.  Physical rights are retained by the owning repository.  Copyright is retained in accordance with U. S. copyright laws.  For information about permissions to reproduce or publish, contact the Special Collections Research Center. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, October  1, 1970 text The Kentucky Kernel, October  1, 1970 1970 2015 true xt70rx93b447 section xt70rx93b447 Tie
Thursday, Oct.

EC

1, 1970

nthjcky Kernel
UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY, LEXINGTON

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Seminar to Study
Education Quality

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a

Singletary Reception

The College Republican Club held a reception
for President Otis A. Singletary Wednesday night
in the President's Room of the Student Center.
Session some 200
During the informal two-ho-

Vol. LXII, No. 20

students met and talked with Dr. Singletary and
his wife. Vice President for Student Affairs Dr.
Robert Zumwinkle was also present.
Kernel Photo By Ken Weaver

The University Student Advisory Committee (USAC) will
use a University grant of approximately $300 to conduct a
two-da- y
seminar on the "quality
of education" at UK, it was
announced yesterday.
Terry McCarty, a US AC member, said that the grant, which
has been supplemented by private donations, will be used to
bring speakers to the seminar and
to conduct classes and symposiums.
Highlighting the sessions will
be a Monday night address by
Dr. John R. Silber, former dean
of the College of Art s and Sciences
at the University of Texas, and
now a professor. He will speak
on "Problems of Undergraduate
Teaching on a Large Campus."
Student Covemment president Steve Bright will relate
Silber's remarks to the current
educational situation on the UK

UK Professor Home Safe After Hijacking

Engineering

professor,

said

Wednesday he was still "a little
ill but very happy" to be released by Jordanian guerrillas.
Kadaba was a passenger
aboard a TWA flight that was
hijacked by guerrillas Sept. 6.

He and the remaining passengers well by the guerrillas. "They
were turned over to the Red gave us a lot to eat," he reCross Friday.
called. "We had grapes, figs,
Kadaba, still suffering from canned meat and Polish saue
illness he contracted sage."
a
while in captivity, flew to AtHe said conditions grew worse
lanta to join his wife and daughafter war between the guerrillas
ter.
Kadaba said he was treated and Jordanian troops broke out.
Kadaba and the hostages were
taken to Irbid, a guerrilla stronghold and scene of fierce fighting.
Kadaba said the hostages
Sedler said that he and Croscame close to being killed four
sen "are not going to appeal times. "The closest, I think, was
this, even though we do not think when a mortar shell fell about
we violated any laws," because 30 yards from us."
the expense of an appeal would
He said, however, that their
be prohibitive.
guards were "extremely concernYesterday, Judge Robert Jacked for our
would
son of the adult division of lie down safety. They
us to
court heard six hours of us. I think upon wanted protect
Juvenile
to esthey
testimony concerning three other tablish good relations with the
charges against Crossen of conAmerican people."
tributing to the delinquency of a
minor.
After they were freed, the hosJackson said he will hand tages were turned over to the
down a verdict on the case Oct. 8. Red Cross in Amman, Jordan's
flu-lik-

Crossen Convicted, Fined
Dr. Philip Crossen was convicted this morning in Fayette
Quarterly Court on three charges
of not having a license for a
place of public entertainment and
one charge of "failing to prevent
lewdness."
According to Crossen's attorney, UK Law professor Dr.
Robert Sedler, he was fined $200
on each count, for a total of
$300. Sedler said that Dr. Crossen was acquitted on one charge
of allowing people to driiik alcohol on the farm where the festival
was held.

volvement"

programs begin

Tuesday. A 10 a.m. "faculty
symposium" will attempt to decide "the appropriate balance
between teaching and research,"
while afternoon classes in the
Student Center will center on in-

dividual education problems

Still III, But Happy
Associated Press
Dr. Prasad K. Kadaba, a UK

address.
campus in a follow-u- p
Miss McCarty emphasized
that the main objective of the
seminar would be the investigation of student and faculty
opinions on the trouble spots of
UK's educational setup.
"We want to come up with
concrete proposals," she said,
"but we also want to get students involved . . .whether it's
input into the Student Advisory
Committee, or just going up to
people and giving them their
ideas. People want to know them,
they'd be surprised."
While students are invited to
Silber's Monday night speech,
most of the seminar's "in-

capital. Later they were flown
to Rome where President Nixon
and Secretary of State William
Rogers greeted them.

Kadaba said the guerrillas
were very disappointed that the
U.S. did not meet their demands,
but he only felt threatened once.
A guard told him: "Maybe, if
we put you in the planes and
blow you up, the Americans
would get worried."

Weather
Lexington and vicinity: mostly sunny and mild today and
Friday, fair and cool tonight.
High today in the upper 70's;
low tonight, 50; high tomorrow,
near 80. Partly cloudy and cooler
Saturday, with precipitation probabilities near 0 percent both today and tonight and 10 percent
Friday.

within the University structure.
In one of those afternoon sessions, President Otis A. Singletary will conduct a history class.
Singletary was a history professor
at Louisiana State University
early in his education career.
Tuesday evening, Dr. Charles
Deusner, a recipient of UK's
Creat Teacher Award, will speak
on "Undergraduate Educational
Reforms and What the Main Campus Can Leam From the Community System."
Miss McCarty said that USAC
has encouraged teachers to devote their Monday and Tuesday
classes to a discussion of the
problems of education at UK.
Faculty members were also asked
to write evaluations of the seminar's activities and their class
discussions. Some faculty members, she said, may conduct "experimental" classes using new
teaching methods.
The seminar, she said, will
probably not result in any specific proposals for improvement in
the University, but instead will
be applied to proposals already
under consideration by USAC.

Pratt Plans 'People's Campaign9

By JERRY W. LEWIS
Assistant Managing Editor
On April 4, 1968, UK student Don B.
Pratt of Lexington was tried for refusing
induction into the U.S. Army. The versified
closing part of his statement before the court
that day read:
"I find it somewhat hypocritical that we
Value peace, but produce war,Value life,
but produce death, Value freedom, but produce suppression and servitude,Value democracy, but produce no choiceThen you
ask me to fight for our country here as well
as abroad.Then you tell me that I must,
fight or 'figjratively' die in prison.Tlien
you interpret laws directed toward me to
sanctify hypocritical beliefs."
Pratt was sentenced to five years in prison
and $10,000 for the stand he took. His case
is still awaiting an appeal before the Supreme
Court of the United States.
Tonrrow, Oct. 2, Pratt stepsinto the
courtroom again. Only, this time, he's making
the charges.
The former UK business administration
major has filed a suit to get his name on
the November ballot as an independent
candidate for Congress from the sixth district
of Kentucky.

Pratt's petition for an independent candidacy was rejected Aug. 12 because it was
.not filed 55 days in advance of the May
primary elections as state law requires. Pratt's
suit charges this law is unconstitutional.

No Real Choice
"We argue that having to register seven
months in advance of the general election is
too discriminatory, and it also doesn't offer
me a real choice to run or not to run after
the primary," Pratt explained.
Judge James F. Cordon of the Western
District of Kentucky is one of a three-judpanel who will hear Pratt's suit. He's the
same judge who sentenced Pratt to prison
in his 1908 draft case.
ge

"I hate to be paranoid about one judge,"
Pratt said, referring to Cordon. "Rut I think
the argument is there and I think if this
man upholds law he will uphold my case
and order that my name be put on the

ballot."
Pratt seems serious when he talks about
his bid for Congress. His hair is somewhat
shorter than it used to be, although he
still has his bicycle and w
Of course, it's seldom

glasses.
w hen liis

youthful

sense of humor doesn't break through his
serious ideas. He admitted he's looking forward to riding his bicycle through the hallways of Congress.
Into The 'System
Probably the one question that is asked
of Pratt most is why he wants to get into
the "system" he's been fighting so long.
Pratt explained his reasons as twofold.
"One, my opposition isn't worth voting
John Watts (the incumbent Democrat) nor Cerald Cregory are the people
who should be elected representatives of
this area. Secondly I decided to run because
of the happenings immediately following
Kent State."
Pratt went on to say that he went to
Washington to lobby against "Nixon's invasion into Cambodia."
This isn't the first time he has lobbied
In the U.S. Capitol. Almost four years ago
Pratt started visiting senators and
voicing opposition to the war
in Vietnam.
Pratt said each time he has gone he
has found "arrogance, ignorance, and an
obvious lack of decision-making- "
by the
Continued on Paje 8, CoL 1

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--

DON PRATT

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* 2

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Thursday, Oct.

1, 1970

Hook Review

Rosten Attacks Both Right and Left
V

7

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i
Skip Althoff discussed plans for the recently organized Food Co-owith its steering committee last night in the Student Center. The
is designed to provide food products
student organized
prices.
K.m.l Photo r Pio w.,.
p

.Inon-inflaliooa-

iy

Plans Menus;
Lack of Money Noted

Co-o- p

The steering committee of the
recently organized Food Co-o- p
presented an initial business report last night.
The Food Co-o- p
is best described in its present planning
stages, said Skip Althoff, Steering Committee Chairman, as
a "purchasing club."
Members of the "club" will
place their orders with the manager, whose job it will be to compile the individual food orders
of Co-o- p
members into a master
order, place the order, and make
sure that the master order is
delivered.
He will then be in charge
of distributing the merchandise
to the proper individuals.
The Steering Committee dewhich
cided that the Food Co-ois to remain independent of the
p,

BROUGHT

University, will need initial capital to cover the costs of incorporation, legal fees and general
operating expenses. A nominal
membership fee is designed to
raise the necessary funds.
Due to the present lack of
capital, the committee said, the
Co-o- p
is prevented from dealing
with perishables such as meats
and frozen foods. The necessary
expansion to accommodate these
goods is hoped for later, the
committee noted.
Althoff also noted that "the
co-o- p
offers advantages other
than getting food at a substantially lower rate." The group is also
distributing balanced low-comenu plans which have been
worked out by UK home economists. They can be obtained in
the Student Government office.
st

TO YOU BY FOUR SEASONS

DOWNTOWN

ZANDALE

on Nicholasville Rd.

Chapter 1
"The APPARELS
OF PAULINE"

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TODAY
Theta Sigma Phi. women's communication honorary, is now accepting applications for the fall, 1970, pledge
class. Membership is selected from
communications,
speech, Journalism,
and telecommunications majors. Applications may be picked up in room 116
Journalism Building, and must be returned there by 4:30 p.m. Friday,
Oct. 2.
Jim Hudson, author of "Building
Space Age Cities Today", will speak
Awareness
before the Environmental
Society at 7:30 p.m. In room 114 Classroom Building.
Dr. David Denton will speak on
"Dialogue and Understanding: Basic
Existential Terms in the Study of
Teaching" at 1:30 p.m. in room 57
Dickey Hall. The colloquium is presented by the Department of Social
and Philosophical Studies in Education.
Free University Classes:
"Auto Mechanics" at 6:30 p.m. In
room 205 Frazee Hall.
"Ins and Outs of the Draft" at 8:00
p.m. in room 203 Frazee Hall.
"Environmental Awareness" at 7:30
p.m. in room 114 Classroom Building.
"Basic Photography" at 6:30 p.m. in
room 202 Frazee Hall.
"How to Retire Before 30, Survive
t"
After the Bomb, or Become
at 8:00 p.m. in room 204 Frazee
Hall.
"Buddhism", a new class for those
Interested in the Buddhist religion, its
history and philosophy, at 7:00 p.m.
in room 109 Student Center. The class
is Ken Patterson, phone
2.

"Youth and Contemporary
a new study of its technolImpact. The
ogy and sociological
course will Involve viewing several
films produced
young
by
people
through th? Appalachian Film Workshop, criticism and suggestions. The
room 111
class meets at 7:30 p.m. in
is
Student Center. The
Dan Mohn, phone
Clmema-tography-

Spiro Agnew, the filth in our
waters, the demoralization of
their teachers, the 'soft, spineless
mush of the frightened Establish'understand'."
ment,' " Rosten says.
In teclmical logic, those ploys
"If I were a college student,
illustrate the Principle of UnI would be made unhappy too:
mitigated Call; in untechnical
by gargantuan classes and burstlingo, they are evidence of uning dormitories; by professors
who hate teaching because it inprincipled chutzpa.
After thus thrilling the reacterferes with either their research
tionaries for nearly 50 pages, he or their
in
turns in beautifully precise
committees
Thus Rosten attacks both the
polemics to answer the "Angry
Old Man" who cries, "What do Right and Left in their extremes.
these spoiled students have to be But the book is by no means
so unhappy about in our collimited to criticism. In equally
leges?"
eloquent language he proclaims
"They don't have to be spoiled reason as the only "Establishto have a great deal to be un- ment" he will defend; intellihappy about starting with Vietgence, investigation, debate and
nam and Cambodia, the tragic criticism he maintains are the
plight of many blacks, the
prevailing power of free men's
luted atmosphere, the rhetoric of free opinions.

",

TOMORROW
Theta Sigma Phi, women's communications honorary, is now accepting
applications for the faU, 1970. pledge
is elected from
class. Membership
speech. Journalism, communications,
and telecommunications
majors. Applications may be picked up this week
In room 116 Journalism Building, and
must be returned by 4:30 p.m.. Friday, Oct. 2.

reversible,

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fw

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It

Matching

"Computers in Our Contemporary
Scene" an introduction to computers,
the advantages of computers, and exploration into the different types of
input and output, and their sociological aspect as related to man and 7 toat
meet Oct.
It
day's society. room will Student Center.
113
6:30 p.m. in
is Dale Lewis, phone
The
3.
"Buddhism" Oct. 8 at 7:00 p.m. in
room 109 Student Center.
"Youth and Contemporary Clmema-tographOct. 8 at 7:30 p.m. In room
111 Student Center.
"Drugs" Oct. 8 at 8:00 p.m. in room
307 Student Center.
"History and Theory of Modern
from Godwin to GoodAnarchism"
man. It will meet on Oct. 5 and 12
at 7:30 p.m. in room 113 Student Cenis Dr. Joseph
ter. The
Kessler, phone

COMING UP
Willis Griffin wiU speak on
"The Place of International and ComTeacher Educaparative Studies atin 1:30
p.m. In room
tion" on Oct. 8
57 Dickey Hall.
The pnysical therapy club will meet
Oct 6 at 7:30 p.m. in the Physical
Therapy Department of the Medical
Center to discuss physical therapy for
hemophilia. All students interested in
physical therapy are Invited to attend.
and pre-de- nt
Attention Junior pre-me- d
students. There will be a meet8 at 7:30 p.m. in room 102
ing Oct
Classroom Building.
SoeleUs Pr Leglbus, pre law honorary, is now accepting applications
for membership. All Interested pre law
students may obtain an application
by contacting either David LeMaster,
101 Holmes
Hall or Damon Talley,
FarmHouse fraternity. 316 Aylesford
Place. Applications are also available
at the Dept. of Speech, 1415 Office
Tower.
Sorerlty Open Rash extends until
December. All Interested girls wishing
to sign up are asked to go to the
Office Tower Room 561. Go Greek-Bec- ome
Involved!
New Free U Classes:
will at"Transactional Analysis"
tempt an approach to the solution of
Dr.

Coll the offi ces of the UK Draft Counselling
and Information Service at
9
after 4:30
or drop by room 107 in the Student
weekdays
Center, any Monday night after 6 p.m.
Information for draft counselling and legal
council are available to the Selective Service System
Registrant on the spectrum of deferments and
alternatives.
252-787-

f

problems relating to ourselven and
others. It will meet on Oct. 6 at 7:30
p.m. in 109 Student Center. It is coordinated by Breck Morrison, phone
2.
"White Racism" an
study
Into racism in yourself, the UniverOct.
sity, and society. It will meet Center.6
at 6:15 in room 120 Student
Student-- Y
is the
phone

"Drum", experiences and knowledge
of drugs will be shared along with discussions of the motivations behind
their use at 8:00 p.m. In room 307
is
Student Center. The
Dr. Thomas Buie.

DRAFT PROBLEMS?

great new
VCSt"

...

or consider what I say
If
you don't agree with me, you cry
i am wrong. If I don't agree
with you, you claim that I don't

TODAY and TOMORROW

"How to own

.

w
f

"A Trumpet for Reason" by Leo
Rosten. Doublcday and Company, Inc. $1.95.
Dy DALE MATTHEWS
Kernel Staff Writer
Leo Rosten takes aim with
both barrels in "A Trumpet for
Reason," one for the Left and
one for the Right. With inspired
wit he destroys some of the more
stereotyped cliches of the New
Left and then does a quick reverse to do the same for the Old
Right.
He replies to the "Angry
Young Man" who cries, "Your
generation does not try to communicate with ours."
"Is it that I am not 'communicating' or that you do not
understand what I am saying?
It may well be that I am not
saying it well. But it may also
be that you do not want to hear,

UK Placement Scrrice
The UK Placement Service Is located
in the Old Agriculture Building. Room
201. For appointments,
call 258-27Register Monday through Friday
with the Peace Corps. Representatives
will be located in the first floor corridor of the Student Center to talk
with interested students.
Register Friday for an appointment
on Tuesday with the Chicago Bridge
and Iron Co. Check schedule book for
late information.
Register Friday for an appointment
on Tuesday with the Ohio Valley Electric Corp. Electrical E., Metallurgical
E. (BS. Locations
Cheshire, Ohio;
Waverly, Ohio; Madison, Indiana. December May graduates.
Register Friday for an appointment on Tuesday with the U.S. Department of Health, Education and
Welfare Audit Agency. Accounting
.IBS). Locations: Alabama, Florida,
Georgia, Missisisppi, North Carolina,
Tennessee, South Carolina, Kentucky.
December, May, August graduates.
Citizenship.
Colleges
(Community
Accounting.)
Register Friday and Monday for an
appointment on Tuesday and Wednesday with McDonnell Douglas Corp.
Civil E.. Electrical E., Mechanical E.
IBS). Location: St. Louis. December,
May graduates. Citizenship.
Register Monday for an appointment on Wednesday
with Central
Trust Co. Accounting
(US). Business Administration,
Economics (US,
MS). Locations: Cincinnati area. December, May graduates.

Play

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BILL CARR, pro.

2 miles from Beltline out
COME VISIT,
OUR NEW
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ZANDALE

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Richmond Rd. U.S. 25 on left
To Avoid Waiting Please Phone For Starting Times
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK

Pauline Is the Lexington Junior . . . always well
dressed no matter the situation, because she makes
Four Seasons her shopping headquarters.

FOUR SEASONS
"APPAREtlSTS TO JUNIORS"

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CITY OF LEXINGTON'S FIRST PUBLIC GOLF COURSE

* J
THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Thursday, Oct.

1, 1970- -3

Eligibility Extended

Days Numbered if Student Deferment Dropped
-

Still
WASHINGTON (AP)
plugging holes in its draft lottery system, the administration
has knocked down the chance
of escaping induction by belate in the year.
coming
The Selective Service System
announced Wednesday a three-mont- h
extension of draft liabiliman whose draft
ty for any
board has reached his lottery
number but who has not been
drafted by the end of the year.
A

Prevent Unfairness
The aim is to prevent the unfairness of drafting one man according to the lottery of last December and then passing up another man with a lower lottery
number just because he became
available along with a crowd of

A

other
men after the liowever, a related fairness prothat of volunteers during next
blemthat of the men already January, February and March.
manpower needs were filled.
That is the kind of situation drafted to meet Pentagon needs
Selective Service officials said
because the latecomers were not they have no estimate of how
created by the mid-yegraduation of hundreds of thousands of available sooner.
many men will be carried over
The carryover men will tend with this three-mont- h
college students, many holding
extended
to benefit the new manpower liability.
lower numbers than those alpool facing next year's draft,
ready called.
Selective Service has placed
The time it takes to process while this year's pool sends exa ceiling of No. 195 nationwide
such men into
status leaves tra men in their place.
this year, meaning the more than
them unavailable for a draft call
The carryovers will, in fact, 4,000 local boards may not call
until late in the year, and the be drafted for 1971 calls even men with higher numbers.
But below that ceiling the
Pentagon has been unwilling to before the regular 1971 manpower pool is touched. Their draft boards have reached widely
wait that long for recruits.
The move leaves unsolved, priority will be second only to varying upper numbers.
ar

A

Notary Here
For Ballots

Correction

Beginning Monday a notary
public will be in the Student
In last Thursday's Kernel, it Government office in the Student
was erroneously reported that Center every day until Oct. 9.
UK junior Lew Col ten called
Applications for absentee bal-- .
the student code a "terminal lots will also be available in
case." It was also reported that the SG office. They must be in
he said, "We're living in a re- the county clerk's office by Oct.
we 12.
pressive community
All Jefferson County applicashould be grateful to the code-i- t's
the first time they spelled tions will be forwarded if left
out what 'niggers' they think in the Student Government
we are." Col ten denies making
the statement.
The Kernel regrets the error.

...

The Kentucky

ernel

The Kentucky Kernel, University
Station, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40506. Second class
postage paid at Lexington, Kentucky.
Mailed five times weekly during the
school year except holidays and exam
periods, and once during the summer
session.
Published by the Board of Student
Publications, UK Post Office Box 4986.
Begun as the Cadet in 1894 and
published continuously as the Kernel
since 1915.
Advertising published herein Is intended to help the reader buy. Any
false or misleading advertising should
be reported to The Editors.
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Editorial Page Editor,
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illWatCh
lm

late

mml
lE'i!
127 W. Main

Ph.

October Information Bulletin
from the U.K. Catholic Newman

Information Classes: For both Catholics and
prospective converts, and for those just interested in learning about Roman Catholicism.
Begins tonight at 7:30 with Father Larry Hehman.
non-Catholi-

Foreign Student- Information Classes: Same content as above, but for foreign
students only. Begins tonight at 7:30 with Sister Irene Martin.
Instruction Class: For couples planning mixed marriages only. Begins Tuesday, October 13th at 7:30 P.M., with Father Moore.
Pre-Can-

a

Series:

252-623-

instructions led by Reverend Paul Carrington

and team. Begins October 21st at 7:30 P.M. at Christ The King School
Library, Colony Road, Lexington.
For More Information on any of the above, call

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* Apolitical Speakers at UK?
In a retreat from last year's open door policy which resulted in the
appearance of Dr. Timothy Leary, the Student Center Board is determined to avoid controversy in its selection of speakers for the coming
year. The negative response by a large segment of the public following
Dr. Leary's oration in which he claimed, "Marijuana is Cod's gift
to mankind," seems to have affected this year's program. The pace of
the Board's future excursions beyond reality is set to a more garden
club atmosphere with the presentation of clairvoyant Jeanne Dixon as the
year's initial speaker.

0N

fsi

LEA

o

.

The reversal of policy is deemed an effort by the Student Center
Board to remain apolitical. In this frenzied attempt, the Board has
rejected plans to secure Black Panther Minister of Defense, Huey Newton. In a further instance it cancelled attempts to bring to the campus
William F. Buckley Jr., editor of National Review and eloquent spokesman for the right. These decisions by the Board are more myopic than
admirably apolitical, for it is important that students be exposed to their
diverging opinions.
In looking at the proper function of the university one must conclude
that students should be confronted with ideologies which overstep
their own precepts. The advancement of any society is determined in
part by its willingness to face the unconventional with scrutiny; the
future of the community lies in its ability to analyze the offerings of
prophets, and to recognize truth from fallacy. In that the university
should be the embodiment, rather. than the entombment, of intellectual
growth, it must provide a forum for the unconventional whether radical
or reactionary. The inability of the classroom to supply this forum
necessitates supplemental pulpits where such concepts may be presented.
A proper agency for this presentation is the speaker series.
Returning to the University of Kentucky Student Center Board, it
is pointed out that this board is one of the few campus groups with
the money as well as organization needed to bring high quality speakers to the University. When this Board assumes a defensive stance and
refuses to provide orators of unpopular or controversial persuasion, it
fails to serve the academic community. When the Board secures speakers
whose appeal to viewers of the Mike Douglas Show is uncontestable
(but there is doubt to the value of their type of revelations to the
University) it renders insult to the collegiate community.

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i&&P$0$M0RfLLiANT

Kernel Forum: the readers write
Code Revision

To The Editor
The following is a spontaneous reaction and nothing more:
The Student Affairs committee which
sponsored the open forum on the Code
is attempting to revise certain sections
particularly offensive to the rights of
students. With this in mind, the achievement of the above depends on the assumption that the committee must function politically, and therefore squabble
over words, drum up support for its efforts, deal with administrative hierarchies,
and do the countless other political things
that are functional and opportune in a
educational system based heavily on
politics.
I, as a member of the committee, am
not acquiescing to any idea that a student code is necessary. The Student Code
is here, the result of Kentucky Law KRS
164.200, which states that "the Board of

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The Kentucky

Iernel

University of Kentucky
1894

THURSDAY,

OCT.

1, 1970

Editorials represent t)ie opinions of the Editors, not of the University.
Frank S. Coots III,
Bob Brown, Editorial Page Editor
Jean Renaker, Managing Editor
Jeff Impallomeni, Sports Editor
Dahlia I lays, Copy Editor
David King, Business Manager
Don Rosa, Cartoonist
Jane Brown, Ron Hawkins, Bradley Jeffries, Jerry Lewis, Mike Wines.
Assistant Managing Editors
Editor-in-Chi-

Trustees may establish proper regulation
for the governance of the University . . ."
This is a given for the seventeen thousand
and some students who come to the institution. The question of how one reacts
to the given depends on a complex of
factors (values, priorities, perceptions of
reality, etc.). If one comes to the conclusion that a set of laws or a code of
conduct disregards the human rights of
people, then a valid reaction for that
person would be to withhold allegiance
The University Student Advisor' Comto that particular statute or code. Such
mittee is sponsoring a Conference on Una reaction transcends that statute or code.
Education October 5 and 6.
This is not the only honorable stand dergraduate
This conference will emphasize three obtake against a law,
that a person may
jectives: (1) Identification and evaluation
code, or statute repressiveof human rights. of the
many elements of the learning proAnother way is to constructively work to
such a cess; (2) Identification and evaluation of
change the repressive measure:
the ways in which we at UK currently
position does not mean one is admitting
attempt to facilitate that process; and (3)
submission to it. It does mean he is takIdentification and evaluation of alternaing a different starting point and is playtive approaches.
ing a different game.
Conferences of this sort experience
Freedom is something which must constantly be struggled for, not something strong pressures toward degeneration into
handed to one in a statute. And if a trivialities and vague generalities. In an efstatute or law presented is repressive of fort to counteract such pressures, USAC is
platthat very freedom, one must endeavor offering for discussion a
to change it through the political process. form for change. This platform is not a
If it is not changed, then the law will comprehensive program. Rather, it seeks
either lose its credibility or the system to exemplify types of changes that might
will fail to adapt itself to the needs and be made at various Ievelsof the University
values of the people. At this point all structure by singling out matters ranging
people concerned with the humanity and from a shift in priorities on a campus-wid- e
freedom of men will exercise their freedom. basis to changes in specific courses. Copies
of this platform will be available at the
The attempt now to revise a document
such as the Student Code is not a comvarious activities.
promise of our freedom. The quibble over
The success of tliis conference will
words may not determine our freedom, but
depend upon you and your thoughtful
it may help us to agree on what that
participation. All of the conference activifreedom should be.
to stimulate hard thinkWillie Cates III ties are designed
about the very real problems pervadSenior A&cS ing
ing undergraduate education at this institution.
The problems are manifold; scarce
EDITOR'S NOTE: AU letters to the ediresources, overfull lecture sections, little
and not meaningful faculty-studetor must be typed, double-spacecontact in
more than 250 words in length. The many fields, very poor advising, often
sub-pa- r
writer must sign the letter and give classiinstruction, an antedated curricuh
fication, address and phone number. Send lum in many areas, a
of grading system, a system of merit evaluaor deliver all letters to Room 113-the Journalism Building. The Kernel re- tion which too often becomes one of
serves the right to edit letters without - publish-or-peris- h
or publiiI;cr dor.'t profit even when outstanding teachers are
changing meani