xt70vt1gj59f https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt70vt1gj59f/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19280330  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, March 30, 1928 text The Kentucky Kernel, March 30, 1928 1928 2012 true xt70vt1gj59f section xt70vt1gj59f m

F.

BLUE RIDGE EDITION
THE KENTUCKY KERNEL

TO CHURCH
IS GO TO CHURCH
FOR STUDENTS
-

UNIVERSITY

..

LEXINGTON,

XVIII

COLLEGES FAVOR Attention! R. O. T. C.

HERBERT HOOVER

FOR PRESIDENT
Complete Returns from Thirteen
Institutions Give Republican
Candidate 3,376 Majority.
AL SMITH IS SECOND
WITH VOTE OF 8,134
Lindbergh, Rogers, and Aimee
McPherson Among lhose
Receiving Scattered Vote

'1

Herbert Hoover and Gov. Al Smith
of New York are far in the lead in a
country-wid-

e

-

KY. MARCH 30, 1928

NUMBER 2:;

AT LAST!

BIRD'S EYE VIEW OF BLUE RIDGE

Off With the Old
On With the New
Where Once Walked One
Nbw Walk Two.

Hobbs Gives Dates
of Regimental Formations

Colonel

All members of the R. O T. C.
regiment have been ordered By
Col. H. P. Hrbbs to be present, in
complete uniform, at the regimental formations to be held on the
following dates:
April 13 Friday 7th and 8th
hours.
7th and
April 19 Thursday
8th hours.
7th
Wednesday
April 25
and 8th hours.
April 30 Monday 7th and 8th
hours.
May 8 Tuesday 8th hour only.

One of the
of the
campus, the single plank bridge
across the creek behind the gymnasium, has passed. A good, sturdy, sensible, wooden bridge has
replaced it. Yet our eyes dim with
tears as we listen to the requiem
of thoughtless hammens beating
against bright new nails.
land-mar-

SENIOR ENGINEERS

Honor Eight Students
With Fleur de Lis Pin
Final Program of Le Cercle
Francais Given at Chimney Corner

Eight students of the Romance language department were given the
honor of wearing the "fleur de lis"
pin of the club by that name at the
final meeting of the Le Cercle Francais held last Tuesday evening at the
Chimney Corner.
assidious atThose students-'whostendance and active participation in
the club obtained them this honor,
are: Lolo Robinson, Rebecca Brown,
Sadie Paritz, Margaret Gooch, Rebecca Levy, Louise Schmitt, Gerald
Akers, and Leon Morris. This group
of students to be known as the "fleur
de lis" club, presented to the Cercle
Francais a beautiful silk French flag
in appreciation of the pleasure and
benefit derived from the organization
this year. The flag was presented by
Jeanne Murbach, daughter
of Mrs. Janet Murbach, faculty advisor of Le Cercle Francais.
Reports were given by the various
officers of the club and Miss Rebecca
Levy secretary of the organization,
gave a group of original verses pertaining to the year's work. The
verses were illustrated by Esther
e

Greenfield.

French programs, songs, opera
music and French and American
flags added to the "festivity of the
Moving pictures
of the
occasion.
Seine valley, Normandy and Brittany ended the evenings program.

Patterson Hall

.Girls

Beat Sorority Girls
In Basketball Finals

The Patterson Hall girls' basketball
team won the W. A. A. tournament
Wednesday night in the Women's
gymnasium by defeating the Alpha
0
Gamma Delta sorority by a
score. Miss Helen Skinner was the
referee for the game.
The game Wednesday night was
between the champions of the independent tournament and the champions of the sorority tournament. The
Alpha Gamma Delta team defeated
the Kappas in the final game of the
sorority tournament and the Patter
son Hall girls won the independent
tournament when they defeated Boyd
Hall.
At the end of the first half of the
game Wednesday the sorority team
was two points in the lead and at the
third quarter they led by three points
In the last eight minutes of play
the hall girls succeeded in getting
five points wore thin the Alpha Gam
mas and when the whistle blew they
were two points in the lead. Scrog-giand Blakeman starred for Patter
son Hall, each of them getting nine
points. Ebert and Smith made eight
points each for the Alpha Gams,
22-2-

DULCY' WILL OPEN

MONDAY

NIGHT

Long Awaited Stroller Play to
Make Only Lexington Show-in- g
at Auditorium; Plans for
Tour Completed.
'Dulcy," the long awaited Stroller
play, will open Monday night at 8:15
o'clock at the Woodland auditorium
for its Lexington performance.
Reservations for tickets may be
made at the desk on the first floor of
the Administration building from 9
to 3 o'clock every day or by calling
The Kernel office, 6802; The Lexing
ton Drug Company will take care of
reservations at night. Monday after
noon from 3 o'clock until the time for
the performance, seats may be re
served at the Woodland auditorium.
David K. Bishop, a member of the
Alpha Sigma Phi fraternity, is the
musician for "Dulcy." Mr. Bishop,
a Stroller also, is a member of the
Men's Glee Club and at the present
time, is with them on their tour.
Starman Photographers are mak
ing a series of pictures of the six
leading members of the cast for the
Lexington Leader, to be run next
week. Those whom Starman is photographing are: Mary Virginia Hai-leLewis McDannold, Martha Mini-haJohn Loving, Elizabeth Turner
and Robert Thompson.
The Strollers are planning to leave
on their trip, Wednesday, April 4.
The contract for Harlan contains the
clause that they must be there by
noon in order to fill their engagement.
Many social events have been planned
by the alumni of both Pineville and
Harlan; who have always been en
thusiastic and hospital in receiving
the "strolling actors." Miss Mar
guerite McLaughlin, instructor in the
journalism department, will be the
chaperone.
The complete cast is as follows:
"Dulcy" Mary Virginia Hailey.
Gordon Smith, her husband Lewis
y,

n,

McDannold.
William Parker, her brother

Leon

ard Weakley.
C. Roger Forbes Charles Blaine.
Mrs. Forbes Elizabeth Turner.
Angel Forbes Martha Minihan.
Schuyler Van Duck
Robert
Thompson.
Tom Sterrett, advertising engineer
John Loving.
Frank
Vincent Leach, scenarist
Davidson.
Blair Patterson Tom Riley.
Henry Henry - Maddox.

Professor Leighton
of Ohio State Will
Speak Here April 11

An interesting

Carolina.

view of the buildings and grounds of Blue Ridge, Y. M. C. A. camping grounds located in North
The following picture was taken from a nearby mountain.

600,000.

The founder and builder of Blue
Ridge, Dr. W. D. Weatherford, has
buitded his life and ideals into the
institution, and the equipment is used
to the maximum during the summer
months for the promotion of these
ideals. It is here that each of the 500
students who attend the conference
will find a mountain top experience.
After a long school year, with the

Up-sil-

BARON

IIEYKING TO SPEAK

that makes the

place

worth while
Back of the institution, with all of
its growth, are the fundamental ideals
that will lead into a great future.
Every student should plan to go to
Blue Ridge at least once during his
or her college career. Here the small
vision of the average college student
is enlarged into a world vision and
they meet the challenge of a life
to a service. One, who expects
to live the next 25 years, cannot afford to start that life with a cramped,
selfish attitude of their ,duty as a citizen.

At the Student Conference June 5
one will find mental, social, physical and spiritual uplift that cannot
be estimated, t am frank to say that
the first ten days at Blue Ridge is
worth a semester in school and that
you will return saying, "It is the best
ten days I have ever spent."
16-2-

RIFLE TEAM FIRES
LEAGUE EXPELS Blue Ridge Situated
In "Land of the Sky"
WEST VIRGINIA! Y. M. C. A. Camp in Ideal Spot; TELLING ROUNDS
Near Mt. Mitchell, Highest

Association of Colleges Takes
Drastic Action Against Southern Institution For Failure to
Obey Rules.
Morgantown. W. Va. (New Student
Service) The University of West
Virginia has heen expelled from membership in the North Central Asso
ciation of Colleges and Secondary
Schools,
for playing athletes and
failing to audit its athletic funds.
Specifically, it has ben cnarged with
paying members of the football squad.
The organization, which met last
week in Chicago, comprises 251 colleges. Its action against West Virginia was the most drastic it ever
has taken. The Southern institution,
which was granted membership two
years ago, was censured last year for
its athletic methods. It was ordered
to clean up or get out. Its representatives tried to stave off action at the
latest conference by offering to make
a change in policy, but its promise to
reform came too late.
Charges were filed by the executive
committee, of which Dr. George F.
Zook, president of the University of
Akron, is chairman. Inadequate supervision of athletic funds and pro- seltyting by alumni were charged in
the indictment. The executive committee insisted that the academic,
health and character interests of student bodies should rank first. It recommended firm opposition to payment of money to athletes, and the
abolition of free training tables. So
licitation of prospective athletes by
coaches through promises of money
compensation was denounced afso.
Alumni of the University of West
Virginia are charged with having established a fund with which to induce
athletes to attend the university.
The conference also recommended
that each school's athletic policy
should be controlled by the faculty.
It proposed that coaches be put on
the same basis as other members of
the faculty, both in relation to tenure
of office and salary. Coordination of
athletic and general educational problems was given as the aim of the as-- ;
sociation by its president, Dr. H. M.
Gag'e, president of Coe College.

Life

An April Fool party will be given
Tuesday night by the Agricultural
Society of the University for the ben
efit of students in the College of Agriculture it was announced by H. C,
Brown, who is to be in charge of the
program.
Following the party, the pledging
services will be held by the Phi
Omicron and Alpha Zeta fraternities and by the Block and Bridle

grind of the classes and examinations
and the constant round of activities
don't you sometimes long to steal
away for a few days into some secluded spot in God's green outdoors
away up high
to meditate and
pray to gain inspiration and vigor
for the great task before you? Our
Master needed this refreshment, how
much more must you and I need" it.
There is no better place in all the
world for such experience than the
great outdoors in the Blue Ridge.
For generations western North Carolina has been called the "Land of the
Sky," and it has long been characterized as one of the most exquisitely
beautiful regions in all America. This
reservation has become by statute
the only national playground in the
Southeast.
It is not so much the location and
beauty of Blue Ridge as the spirit

(By Bart N. Peak)
Blue Ridge the "Land of the Sky"
was started in' 1906 when the first
tract of land was purchased. Since
then seven tracts have been secured.
making an aggregate of 1561 acres.
By 1912 there were three buildings on
the grounds and at present there are
48 buildings, in which more than 800
The
people can, be accommodated.
present valuation of the property is

Seniors Prefer
Phi Beta Kappa

AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY
TO GIVE APRIL FOOL PARTY

WILL TOUR EAST
Annual Tour Will
Include Detroit, Niagara Falls,
Buffalo, New York City, and
Other Eastern Cities.

Twenty-Nint- h

James A. Leighton, Ph. D., head of
the department of philosophy at Ohio
State Univefsity, will be the guest- lecturer of Doctor Terrell, of the
philosophy department of the Uni
versity, on April 11. Doctor Leighton
is a nationally renowned authority
upon philosophical matters, and is the
author pf several authoritative works
upon the subject, including "The Indi
vidual and the Social Order," and
"The Field of Philosophy."
Leighton will speak on
Doctor
"Success Illusory and Genuine," in
the auditorium on the third floor of
the Education building, at 4 o'clock
on Wednesday, April 11.
Doctor Terrell, head of the University philosophy department, whose
guest Doctor Leighton will be during Yale
his stay in Lexington, extends an
Key
invitation, on behalf of Doctor Leighton, to all students of the University Class Also Says Prohibition Has
and all interested persons, to attend
Been Detrimental to College
the lecture.

club.

AT AUDITORIUM, MONDAY
NIGHT. 8:15 O'CLOCK

KENTUCKY

college poll of Presiden-

tial possibilities according to figures
announced by The Independent, a
Boston weekly, this morning.
After three days of balloting, with
complete returns received from thirteen colleges and universities, the
Secretary of Commerce tops the list
with 11,510 votes. New York's Democratic governor has polled 8,134.
Of the remaining eight candidates
important in the balloting,
Dawes held third place with
1,727 votes, while Senator Reed of
Missouri, Democrat, came fourth with
1,071- Governor Ritchie, Democrat,
of Maryland; former governor Low-deof Illinois; Senator Walsh, of
Montana, Democrat! 'Senators Curtis,
of Kansas, and Willis, of Ohio, Republicans; and Gov. Vic Donahey, of
Ohio, Democrat, followed in order.
The total votes for the ten men included in The Independent's returns
number 24,827, and the individual totals for each to date are as follows:
Republicans: Hoover 11,510, Dawes
1,727, Lowden 656, Curtis 163, Willis
152; Democrats: Smith 8,134, Reed
1,071, Ritchie 809, Walsh 491 and
Donahey 114. Lindbergh Will Rogers, and Aimee Semple McPherson
were among the numerous possibilities who received scattered votes.
Most of the colleges which have
so far retuned their figures, embracing both students and faculties, allowed one vote each for a Republican
and Democratic choice, which largely
accounts for the huge and comparatively close leads piled up by the two
leaders over the rest of the field in
these two institutions.
n,

r

OF

SEE 'DULCY'

(By New Student Service)
Seniors in Yale College, according
to preferences indicated in the an
annual class vote, prefer a Phi Beta
Kappa key to the "Y" earned in major sports, like Harvard next best to
Yale, consider Lindbergh and Mussolini the outstanding world figures
of the day, that prohibition has
harmed college life, that English is
the most valuable subject and psychology the least valuable, and they
are opposed to splitting the college
into smaller units.
Seniors in the Sheffield Scientific
School voted Lindbergh their favorite
world figure, a mayor "Y" more desirable than Sigma Xi, and Princeton
their favorite college next to Yale.
Their favorite in fiction is d'Artag-nain history, Napoleon; among
novels, "Tom Jones;" among prose
authors, Thomas Hardy; among
poems, "If"; and among poets, Kip-

Baron Heyking, of the University
of Dorpat, Latvia, and an" officii of
KAPPA DELTA PI MEETING
the League of Nations, will speak before the international relations group
Kappa Delta Pi, honorary educa- of the University on April 12. His
tional fraternity, will hold a meeting subject will be "Protection of the
Mr. Heyking is in ling.
in room 202, Education building, to Minorities."
These were only a few, a very few,
day at 3 o'clock, according to an an charge of the committee on protection
nouncement. All members are re of minorities for the League of Na of the matters on which the seniors
declared themselves,
tions in the now Baltic states.
guested to attend.

Complete First Stage of National Match That Is to Continue
"The Land of the Sky," another
to April 15; Richardson High
name for Blue Ridge, the mecca for
Score Man.
Peak of Range

i

all college students, is situated just
20 miles from Mount Mitchell, the
The rifle
has
highest peak east of the Rockies. It completed team of the University Nafirst stage
rests on a broad shelf of a mountain tional RifletheMatch which of the on
began
slope, which is covered with trees,
16
manhigh ferns, and rhodendrons, wa-- , March 15. and will continue through
April
The total score for the ten
tered by numberless small streams. highest men was 1,925
out of a posFarther down the slope is a natural
2,000.
chapel and amphitheater, in which sible positions The stage consisted of
two
prone and sitting.
the general meetings are held. At
The highest score was made by
sunset, a beautiful view is afforded
John J. Richardson, Jr., which was
one of the mountains opposite, loom-- i
198 out of a possible 200. Jess M.
d
cloud? '
ing among the
Laughlin made a close second by
which hang over it.
scoring 197 out of a possible' 200.
In the valley below, near the chapel,
The lowest score made by any of the
is a large lake, which is used for
ten
swimming and rowing. There is also ble members was 189 out of a possi200. Fifteen men compose the
swimming pool, in which
an
only the score of the highthe campers take their daily plunge. team, but
est ten count.
The delegates stay at Blue Ridge for
The team is under the direction of
a period of two weeks, in cottages
James L Keasler, first lieutenant in
and huts, living a real outdoor life,
the United States infantry and inroughing it to the extreme.
structor in military tactics in the deThe main buildings of the associa- partment
of military science of the
tion are white, adding to the
University
The main;
of the scene.
There are four stages in the naassembly building is called Robert E.
each, stage must be
Lee Hall, and follows closely to the tional match and
completed on a certain date. The
the outlines of a typical Southern second stage is now in progress and
mansion. Seen from the drive, as one
approaches the camp grounds, the must be completed by April 1. The
positions
white buildings with the mountains kneeling. in this stage are prone and
Each man fires twenty
rising behind them as a massive
background, make a picture which is shots in each stage.
The members of the R. O. T. C.
not easily forgotten.
units who compose the team are John
O. Brannan,' Howard F. Brown, Tom
Buckner, Claude W. D. Daniel, Austin
Henderson, James R. Hester, Virgil
"Go
D. Johnson, Jess M. Laughlin, Earl
C. May, John R. Moore, Edward F.
Church
Morris, Arthur C. Munyan, John J.
The Y. M. C. A. and the Y. W. C. A. Richardson, Jr., William D. Simpson
of the University announce that April and C. Smith.
1 will be the date set aside for the
annual "Go to Church Sunday" for
the students and faculty. The object
To
of- the movement
is to form the
church going habit among the stuEditor of American Poultry
dents.
Magazine Praises New Plant
In cooperation with the W. M. C. A.
and the Y. W. C. A. pastors
At Experiment Station
of the different churches have anR. R. Hannas, editor of the Amerinounced special services for students
this Sunday, and posters have been can Poultry Magazine, published at
placed on the campus giving the ser- Chicago, visited the University last
week to see the reconstructed poultry
mons to be preached.
Seats will be reserved for those plant at the experiment station farm
soand to inspect experimental work bemembers of the fraternities and
rorities who indicate their intention ing done there.
Mr. Hannas was well pleased with
of attending services in a body, to
Mr. Bart N. Peak, secretary of the achievements of experiment station
men, and said that the poultry plant
Y. M. C. A.
of Its
Faculty members are asked to was one of the most
make known this movement to their kind. While on the campus, ne delivclasses and the presidents of the var- ered a lecture on "Poultry" to the
ious organizations on the campus are class in that subject.
Mr. Hannas, who was a member of
also requested to aid in getting as
many as possible to attend the church the experiment station staff and instructor, in poultry at the University
of their choice.
of New Jersey for nine years, is making a tour of the Southern states.
Camps
Blue
During his
visit in this state
he inspected the Kentucky Hatchery
"Many
and brooding plant at Lexington, the
One of the main features of the S. H. Ginstead poultry plant at LebBlue Ridge camps are the peppy, anon, the largest of its kind in the
sports. After- United States, and the Campbellsville
clean,
noons and nights are entirely devoted Hatchery in Taylor county, which is
the largest in the state and deals exto various activities.
chicks.
d
Swimming
is perhaps the most clusively in
popular, but basketball, tennis, baseDOCTOR MINER TO SPEAK
ball and hikes are by no means neglected. Golf has also been introduced.
Dr. J. B. Miner and Dr. Gardner C.
The last night of camp is stunt night,
when states present original pro- Basset, will attend the annual meetgrams.
ing of the Southern Society of PhilEach sport has a promoter and del- osophy and Psychology, to be held
egates are at liberty to participate during the Easten holidays, at
Va. Doctor Miner is a memat any time. Various contests are
held with honor awards for the win- ber of hf council and will read a paner. In 1921 the University boys won per oi "How to Proceed in Thinking
Aboui uie mid."
the basketball championship.
t

multi-colore-

ice-co-

pictur-esquene- ss

"Y" Organizations
Sponsor
to
Sunday'

Poultry Expert Pays
University
Visit

Ridge
Have

Sports

two-da- y

blood-teste-

Lex-into- n,

The Senior Engineers will leave
April 4 on their twenty-nint- h
annual
trip through the east. They plan to
be gone two weeks and will visit
New York, Buffalo, Niagara Falls and
Detroit. The trip will be in charge
of Dean Paul Anderson, and Profs.
W. E. Freeman, J. B. Dicker, J. R.
Johnson and D. V. Terr 111. Following
is the schedule for the tour:
Detroit
April 5
Ford Motor Company,
(Fordson plant, River Rouge plant,
Dearborn plant), and the Ford air
port.
April 6 Lincoln Motor Company,
American Car and Foundry Company,
United States Rubber Company (Morgan and Wright plant), and Detroit
Water Works (nitration plant).
April 7 General Motors Corporation (Pontiac plant), and General
Motors proving grounds.
Niagara Falls
April 8 Sightseeing around the
falls, including the gorge route.
'April 9 United States Light and
Heat Corporation, (storage battery
plant), Niagara Falls Power Company, Carborundum Company, Model
of Niagara Falls, and American Society of Heating and Ventilating Engineers' dinner.
Buffalo

April 10 The Larkin Company,
and the National Lamp Works of the
General Electric Company.
April 11 American Radiator Company, and the American Brass Company.
April 12 American Lithographing
Company, the Buffalo Consistory, the
Albright Art Gallery, and Buffalo
Forge Company, followed by Buffalo
Alumni Club Banquet.
New York City

April 13 From Buffalo, those students who so desire may go on to
New York; however, this is not required. The seniors will report back
to classes Wednesday, April 18, at 8
a. m. After this date there are no
further organized sight trips.
All engineeripgs are required to
take this trip before graduation. It
is taken in order to give the coming
graduates an insight .into the workings of the great industries, which
could not otherwise be obtained in the
blue grass section.
Headquarters of the party are the
hotel, Detroit, The Hotel Lafayette, Buffalo, The Niagara
hotel, Niagara Falls, and the Hotel
Manger, New York. All mail and
telegrams should be sent to these
Book-Cadill-

places.

Y. W. C. A. to Send

Delegates to Blue
Ridge Convention
Plans are being made to send "a
number of .girls of the University Y.
W. C. A. to the annual conference at
Blue Ridge. No delegates have been
decided upon definitely but the names
of several girls who are prominent in
Y. W. C. A. work have been mentioned as possible candidates. They
are: Mildred Kidd, Elise Bureau, Evelyn Colley, Alice Whittinghill and
Elizabeth Cramer.
The courses this year at Blue Ridge
will attempt to give the girls a soul
philosophy of life. It is planned to
help the girls with their problems in
theology and in their understanding
of God. The new problem of vocations for women will be included in
the program as well as discussions on
our present educational system.
Many interesting speakers and lecturers have been secured to speak at
the annual conference.
.
WILL SPEAK AT
WESLEYAN COMMENCEMENT

DR. McVEY

Dr. Frank L. McVey, president of
the University, has accepted an invitation to deliver the commencement
address at Kentucky Wesleyan College, Winchester, June 5. The subject has not been announced. Dr. and
Mrs. McVey are in Florida, where the
president is undertaking an educational survey of the Florida schools
under the auspices of the University
of Florida.
NO KERNEL NEXT WEEK

Today's issue of The Kernal will
be the last until Friday, April 13.
The Kernel staff, with the other members of the University, will celebrate
the Spring vacation by not doing any
work next week.
Editor's Note.

Y. M. C. A. PLANS

FOR ANNUAL BLUE
RIDGE CONFERENCE
Expect to Send Big Delegation
of University Students to
Celebrated Resort
BART PEAK WILL HAVE
CHARGE OF U. K. GROUP
Camp Is Open to Any Student
of Southern College; Program. Is Varied
The University in general and the
Y. M. C. A. in particular is making
extensive plans to send a large delegation of students to the Southern
Students' Camp at Blue Ridge, N. C,
June 15 to 25. Two official delegates,
the new president of the Y. M. C. A.
to be elected in the near future, and
Bart N. Peak, general secretary of
the Y. M. C. A., will be sent to represent the University.
Sponsored by National "Y"
This camp is sponsored by the na
tional Y. M. C. A., for the benefit of
students attending southern colleges;
with the purpose of fostering student
contact among the colleges of the
South. Last year 100 southern colleges were represented by 700 stu
dents and this year a larger delega
tion is anticipated. Any student in a
southern college is given the privilege of attending this camp whether
he be a member of the Y. M. C. A.
or not. The program of the camp is
not limited to the field of the Y. M.
C. A. alone, but deals with all phases
of student life.
Will Train Presidents
To provide for a better under
standing of their tasks, a presidents'
training school will be conducted for
six weeks this year at Blue Ridge,
from June 8 to July 1C. This school
is organized as a regular section of
the Y. M. C. A. graduate school and
is sponsored by the Regional Student
Council.
Between thirty and forty
presidents are expected to enroll.
Many
administrations, recognizing
the value of the school to the life of
the campus, are now paying all or a
large share of the expenses of their
association president.
As several
college president have indicated, they
know of no place where a like sum
would be invested to yield such large
returns.
To Give Scholarships
Scholarships of forty dollars have
been made available by the Y. M. C.
A. graduate school this year. These
scholarships are to apply on the expenses of the school and
be
granted to qualified presidents who
complete the course.
Most coleges
and universities give credit for the
work done in the presidents' training
school.

Faculty
The faculty for the conference this
year includes: W. D. Weatherford, of
Vanderbilt; W. E. Upshaw, of Yale;
O. R. Magill, of Columbia, and C. B
Loomis, of Yale.
In addition Mr.
Philips Elliott, secretary of the national council student division, has
been secured as a special lecturer on
association problems.

Cornell Professor
Will Give Address
Lane Cooper to Speak at Annual
Phi Beta Kappa Banquet
April 27
Prof. Lane Cooper, head of the department of English at Cornell University, will deliver the annual Phi
Beta Kappa address April 27. The
address will follow the annual banquet to be given for Phi Beta Kappa
members and their friends at the Lafayette hotel.
Doctor Cooper is an author, editor
and speaker of note. He has written
extensively on the influence of classical thought in modern life and literature.
The Kentucky chapter which was
installed two years ago, aims to make
its annual address an important event
in the community. It is making an
effort to bring this meeting to the attention of all members of this National honorary scholarship group
who reside in this vicinity and to
welcome all others who may be interested in scholarly addresses which
the fraternity endeavors to bring before Kentucky audiences each year.

W. A. A. Will Hold

Annual Banquet at
Hotel Tuesday Night

The Woman's Athletic Association
will hold their annual banquet in the
Palm room of the Phoenix hotel,
Tuesday night at 6 o'clock, April 3.
and the new officers of the organization will be installed at this time.
Virginia Robinson, president of the
association, has announced the following committees: decorations,
and
menu,
Louetta Greeno;
program.
Mary Ader; location, Nancy Mary

Wilson; tickets, 'Elizabeth Cramer;
publicity, Ann Pansock and Leida
Keyes.
The Alpha Gamma cup, and the W.
A. A. awards will be made following
the banquet. The tickets are one dollar and may be purchased from members of the council and the sorority
jepresentatives.

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL

PAGE TWO

THE KERNEL

Edited by

--

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION

They Tell Me

of
THE UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY

01

0

I

Raymond

SECRETARY-TREASURE- R

Mary

Barnhill, A. B.
192G, is assistant dean of women and
assistant professor of English at Ot-terbein College at Westerville, Ohio.

I

Mrs. Rodes Estill, '21
L. Kirk, '24

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE
Walter Hillenraeyer, '11
Wayland Rhodes, '15

Dr. George H. Wilson,
Dr. E. C. Elliott, '02

W. C. Wilson, '13

Wm. H. Townsend,

04

12

Edmunds

Each year during the annual meeting of the Kentucky Educational Association in Louisville, the University of Kentucky
dinner is held in one of the large hotels. Already this year
plans are being made for this dinner which will be held as
usual on the second day of the meeting. The exact location,
and time have not as yet been announced, but the announcement will be forthcoming soon.
The dinner last year was one of the most successful events
of this kind in the history of dinners. There were several
hundred graduates, former students and friends of the University present and the program was most enjoyable throughout. All who attended this event last year were so loud in
their praise that this year arrangements are being made to
accommodate a much larger number than before. Tickets can
be had by writing to this office or by calling at the booth
'occupied by the Alumni Association at K. E. A. headquarters.
The Alumni Association will maintain a desk

at

headquar-

It

is YOUR banquet

let's make it the best ever.

FOOTBALL HIT BY
TRUSTEES IN 1896
Resolution Passed At Meeting
Practically Abolishes Game;
Students' Petition Results in
Reinstatement of Sport.
The board of trustees at the December meeting had passed resolutions practically abolishing football,
going further apparently than President Patterson had intended, so he
called the students together in the
spring and suggested a plan by which,
on petition, the students might get
football reinstated. The conditions
were complied with and the board at
its June meeting rescinded, or modified, their former action.
Decoration Day was this year given
up to a dual meet with K. U., re
sulting in points, S. C. 68, and K. U
36. The events with the winners were
as follows:
dash, Alford '96, S. C, 10
100-Ya-

seconds.

High jump, Slayden, K. U., 5 feet,
2 inches.

Willmott, K. U.,

run,

880-Ya-

2:26 2.
Pole vault, Denny, 8 feet.
220-YarAlford '96, S. C, 26 sec
onds.

Throwing
'96, S.
440-Ya-

C,

the hammer, Carnahan
86 feet, 4 inches.
run, Haley, S. CI, 56 sec

onds.

In the Centre game of November

m

Margaret Wayne Wooton, A. B.
John PeliaVHoltzclaw, Jr., B. S. M 1926, now is Mrs. James Higgins, and
E. 1926, is with the engineering de- is living in Elsiecoal, Ky.
partment of the Buffalo Forge Com
Mary Dorothy Baker, A. B. 1927, is
pany of Buffalo, N. Y. He was married to Miss Elizabeth Cox, June 26,' teaching in the High school at
Ky.
1926, and their address is 274 Lexington avenue, Buffalo, N. Y.
Jane Shelton Bristow, A. B. 1927,
Julia Holbrook Taylor, A. B. 1926, is teaching in the schools at Middles- boro, Ky.
is located in Owenton, Ky.

HELP OUT YOUR ASSOCIATION
By Filling Out This Blank.

Mary Page Milton,' A. B., 1926, is
registrar for the Connecticut College
for Women, at New London, Conn.

Lunch
Dinner

Open between meals in the morning for Sandwiches,
Milk, Hot Drinks, Candy and Ice Cream

-

UNIVERSITY

..Give name of firm, etc.

Business Address

Residence Address

Name and Ages of Children.
Note: Please give list of your clubs, lodges and honors.
Give short outline of your life since leaving college.

CAFETERIA

Basement Administration Bldg- -

SOUTHERN RAILWAY SYSTCM
DIRECT LINE FROM

LEXINGTON
TO

All Points in the

NORTH, EAST, SOUTH AND WEST
Cincinnati, New Orleans, Jacksonville, The Carolinas
and St. Louis

ave-nu-

Convenient Schedules to All Points
For Ticke