xt70vt1gms52 https://exploreuk.uky.edu/dips/xt70vt1gms52/data/mets.xml Kentucky. Department of Education. Kentucky Kentucky. Department of Education. 1945-04 Bulletins  English Frankford, Ky. : Dept. of Education  This digital resource may be freely searched and displayed in accordance with U. S. copyright laws. Educational Bulletin (Frankfort, Ky.) Education -- Kentucky Educational Bulletin (Frankfort, Ky.), "High Schools in War-Time Regulations 1944-45 High School Data", vol. XIII, no. 2, April 1945 text 
volumes: illustrations 23-28 cm. call numbers 17-ED83 2 and L152 .B35. Educational Bulletin (Frankfort, Ky.), "High Schools in War-Time Regulations 1944-45 High School Data", vol. XIII, no. 2, April 1945 1945 1945-04 2021 true xt70vt1gms52 section xt70vt1gms52 vorks,
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. Commonwealth Of Kentucky 0

EDUCATIONAL BULLETIN

___—_———_._.——
_—__———————_——_—
_—_—__.—_____—_—

 

 

HIGH SCHOOLS IN WAR-TIME
REGULATIONS

1944—45
'IIOH SCHOOL DATA

   

Published by

' 1.1.1,; DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
’ ’ JOHN FRED WILLIAMS

Superintendent of Public Instruction

 

 

 

 

 

ISSUED MONTHLY

Entered as second-class matter March 21, 1933, at the post office at
Frankfort, Kentucky, under the Act of August 24, 1912.

Vol. X||| April, 1945 ' No. 2

 

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 FOREWORD

Each year the State Department of Education, through its
Division of Supervision, prepares and issues a report giving pertinent
information regarding the high schools of the state. This bulletin
not only gives this information but in addition includes some discus-
sion of the situation in our high schools in war-time, along with some
recent regulations of the State Board of Education concerning the
granting of high school credits for educational experience in the
Armed Forces.

The high schools of Kentucky, both public and private, are
accredited each year by the State Board of Education. The official
rating given each high school by the State Board of Education is
made on the recommendation of the Commission on Secondary
Schools of the Kentucky Association of Colleges and Secondary
Schools. This Commission is composed of the following members:

M. J. Belew R. E. Jaggers

J. M. Deacon Lee Francis Jones
Sister Dolorosa M. E. Ligon
Sister Catherine Teresa W. G. Nash

Miss Dorothy Graff C. V. Snapp

Carl Fields W. H. Vaughan
William O. Gilreath Arville Wheeler
J. M. Glenn S. S. XVilson
Mark Godman C. R. 'Wimmer

Duke Young

The material in this bulletin was prepared by Mark Godman and
Sam Taylor of this Department.

JOHN FRED VVILLIAMS
Superintmdent of Public Instruction

 

  

 

  
 

 

 

‘ "an ‘

Part I
HIGH SCHOOLS IN WAR-TIME—REGULATIONS

Tho war—time program contimws. The war continues to make
increasing demands upon the schools. Bond drives, salvage drives,
and other war-time community enterprises to which the schools can
contribute will continue to make demands upon the schools. The
war-time emphasis that has been placed on the high school curriculum
should definitely continue. Especially important in this regard are
first aid, physical fitness and sanitation. In. fact, increased emphasis
upon all programs involving health education should be made. In-
creased facilities for providing occupational information and guid-
ance of pupils into critical war services should continue to be pro-
vided. Along with all this should go an increased emphasis 011 high
school mathematics, science, training for democratic living through
community and classroom activities, and pre-induction courses that
are most helpful to boys who face military training and assignments.
According to military authorities, basic language skills, social science
which includes map reading, and the causes for which we went into
the war are most vital prepa atory material for the inductee.

Jonsidering the fact that there is a great demand for nurses in
the military branches as well as in civilian hospitals, it is increas-
ingly important that such pre—nursing subjects as chemistry, biology,
mathematics, health and sanitation be given special emphasis in the.
school program.

Some of the effects of the war upon the schools. It was inevit—
able that the enrollments in our high schools would decrease because
of the induction of boys into the armed forces and the employment
of both boys and girls in war industries. The replacement of man-
power by boys and girls on the farms has also been a factor in de—
creasing high school curollments. However, these circumstances do
not account entirely for the large percentage of boys and girls drop-
ping out ot.‘ high school before graduation. The natu ~al restlessness
born of the war emergency has had much to do with this result. The
conclusion is clear. The schools must redouble their efforts to hold
students in high school until they receive their high school diplomas.
High school boys should be advised of the fact that preferred assign-
ments and promotions in the military forces are more easily secured

52

    

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ives,
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ents.
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it" one has completed his high school education. Again, it should be
impressed upon the students that they can make their best contribu—
tion not only to the armed services but also to business and industry

it they are. fortified with a complete high school education.

\Ve hear much concerning: juvenile delinquency due to the war.
Naturally, the young person who looks out on the future as a thing
that is uncertain and possibly full of tragedy for him is living under
nervous tension and strain. This tension too frequently expresses
itself in the breakdown of character. Many progressive schools are
finding that one of the best ways to combat this problem is found in
a well-rounded school and community program for young people.
Hence we observe these schools and communities instituting whole-
some social and recreational activities that make an especial appeal
to youth.

The war has had many other adverse effects upon the schools.
Because of it there has been a marked decline in the supply of avail-
able teachers, a reduction in the, general level of the training of
teachers employed, a reduction of physical facilities available for
schools, such as buses and materials for repairs and maintenance,
and a discontinuance of needed building construction.

Cmmimm'ty Articulation. The war has brought about connnun-
ity cooperation on. a scale that has never existed before in the history
of education. It is now recognized as never before that the school
must increasingly become an integral part of the community it serves.
This it must do if it is to assume its full responsibility in perpetuating
democracy. The transition of the school and its activities to a cycle
of school-community inter-action will be slow because of the teachers’
resistance to a break from t 'aditional procedure, and also because the
school has been so close to the connnunity that it has failed to see and
utilize its many educational resources and possibilities. \Vherever
the school has made a conscious effort to articulate its activities with
those of its connnunity, the result has been a new perspective and a
new interest 011 the part of teachers and pupils. To them the com—
munity becomes a laboratory with a wealth of educational materials.

lt would be well for the teachers and principal in a given high
school to ask themselves such questions as these:

is my school taking an active part in projects designed to better
this connnunity?

Does my school work closely with the various agencies and
groups that are primarily concerned with the social i111provement of

53

 

  

 

the community (the churches, health departments, governmental
agencies, welfare organizations, etc.) ‘?

Are the classes in health, biology, and home. economics in this
school doing anything to help in solving problems of disease and
sanitation in the community?

Are the pupils themselves helping to eradicate these undesirable
conditions?

Are the students allowed to visit municipal buildings, museums,
factories or stores to find firsthand information related to the work
in their classrooms?

Has the school invited persons with special talents and interests
and who reside in the community to come to the classrooms and share
these talents and interests with the pupils?

Do the teachers take an active part in the worth-while social and
recreational, activities of the community?

Does the school make its facilities available to recognized com-
munity groups for their meetings?

Are the pupils in the school active in studying problems of hous-
ing, agriculture, home and community beautification, recreation,
and nutrition?

These are but a few of the areas which one might mention that
have to do with bringing about higher standards of living for the
people of. the community.

Regulations regarding high school credit fm' those in the Armed
Forces. Thousands of young people are inducted into the Armed
Forces before they have completed their high school education. Tlll
problem that many of. them desire to solve is how they can best 0011‘
tinue their education while in military service. Fortunately fol
them, the Army and Navy School, operated under \Var Departmenl
directive and called the United States Armed Forces Institute, hf“
been established with headquarters at Madison, \Visconsin. The pro
gram of this Institute consists of four major divisions: (a) Institutl
correspondence courses, (b) University extension correspondencl
courses, (c) Self-teaching courses, and (d) Off—duty classes. Eacl
high school principal should write the United States Armed Force
Institute, Madison Wisconsin and secure a Catalog and throughi
acquaint all prospective inductees with the opportunities that ill
Institute offers them in continuing their educational training whil
in the Armed Forces.

54

 

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JW‘FWV 1;;

On September 15, 1944 the State Board of Education passed
certain regulations regarding high school credit for educational ex-
perience in military service. These regulations follow:

Regulations Regarding High School Credit For Educational
Experience In Military Service

Credit toward high school graduation may be allowed for edu—
cational experience in military service in cooperation with the recom-
mendations of the United States Armed Forces Institute, Madison 3,
\Visconsin. In order for a pupil to secure this credit, he must re-
quest the Armed Forces Institute to send a complete record of his
educational training and experience to the school which he designates.

In evaluating the reports from the Institute regarding Special-
ized Training courses, the local school should give special considera-
tion to the following items: (1) the name of each course successfully
completed; (2) the grade made in each course successfully com-
pleted; and (3) the number of clock hours spent in each course suc—
cessfully completed. In such courses a minimum of 180 clock hours
will be regarded as the time allotment for one unit of credit; a min-
imum of 90 clock hours will be regarded as the time allotment for
a half unit of credit.

Since it will not be possible for the institute to indicate the
exact number of hours involved in the completion of most of the
off-duty educational courses (correspondence courses, for example),
it is recommended that the local school evaluate such courses on the
basis of the information provided by the institute.

In order to receive a diploma from an accredited high school
under these regulations, a pupil must comply with the following
requirements :

1. He must have completed not less than twelve (12) units of high
school work in regular attendance during the regular school
term. Variations from this standard are subject to the approval
of the Director of Supervision.

2. He must satisfy the regular subject requirements of the school
granting the diploma. .

3. The educational experience and achievement reported by the
Armed Forces Institute should be evaluated in terms of units of
work and must bring the total amount of credit to sixteen units
in order to qualify the pupil for graduation.

4. No more than two units of credit may be given for the comple-
tion of the various Basic or Recruit Training programs.

it should be borne in mind that the lluited States Armed Forces
institute is not an accrediting agency. Service personnel on active

55

 

  

duty who desire to apply for high school credit for their military
training or off- dutv educational achievements will use the application
blank “Application for Credit for Educational Achievement During
Military Service ” USAFI Form No 47, Revised September 1944
The applicant will fill out page one of the blank sign it, and then
give the application to the officer at his post or station who has
access to the service records of service personnel. This officer \\ lll
fill out from the service record the information about the applicant’ 5
military training, sign and forward to the address named by the
applicant.

\Nhen the school officer receives this application, he should read
carefully the instructions. In order to reach an evaluation of the mili-
tary training of the applicant as certified, it will be advisable for the
school official to have available the handbook published by the
American Council 011 Education, “A Guide to the Evaluation of
Educational Experience in the Armed Services ” and a copy of the
pamphlet “Ea1ning Secondary School Credit in the Armed Forces,”
published bv the National Association of Secondary School Princi-
pals, 1201 Sixteenth Street, N. VV., \Vashington, D. C. The address
of the American Council 011 Education is 363 Administration Build-
ing, Urbana, Illinois.

By referring to the above material the school official should be
able to reach a decision as to the amount of credit to be granted.

Length of (attendance required for semester credit before enter-
ing the Armed Forces. The State Department of Education has re-
ceived many communications from superintendents and principals
requesting information regarding what may be done relative to giv-
ing high school credits to their students who either volunteer to entel‘
the Armed Forces or who are drafted. In order to clarify this situ-
ation the State Board of Education has passed the following reso-
lution:

“That any student who enters the Armed Services of the United
States may be given semester credit by the District Board of Edu-
cation for any courses in which a passing standard is being main-
tained; provided, however, that six weeks of the semester shall have
been completed in order to be given full semester credit.”

56

 

 iilitary

ication

During

, 1944.

(1 then Part II

ho has SECONDARY EDUCATION IN KENTUCKY—1944-45

:er will _ _ , _ ,
licant’s Schools and Types of ()rganzzatmns. l'xentucky now has (181

bV the high schools. Of the 68], high schools now operating, 616 are com-
" plete organizations, that is, they offer high school work through the
twelfth grade. 0f the 65 high schools that are incomplete organiza—

l read . . . . .
k tions, 41 are separate JUIIIOI' high schools offering Work through

h Inili- . . . . ..
fe t1 grades seven. eight, and nine. The other 24 high schools either otter
r .16 .. .
0 t1 work through the tenth or eleventh grades but do not otter twelfth

7 it:
b.) grade work.
.tlon 0f . . ~ : _' 11-.) .

f t] ()t the (316 complete high school organzations, and are operated
' 0. ie . . H . . ' . .

by countv boards 0t education and 151) are maintained in inde )endent

‘Orces ” '
P school districts. The remaining 70 complete high school organiza—

rinei- . . . _

ll tlons are either private schools or high schools that are operated by
a( ( ress

P I“ the state.
L )111 L- . _ . .

Fifty-one per cent ot the complete high schools 111 the state are
organized on the six—year basis (grade; 742). lt‘orty-l’oui‘ per cent

tould be are four-year organizations (grades 9—12). The other five per cent

ed. of our complete high schools represent modifications of the six-year
‘c enter- or four-year high school organizations.
has re— The following table presents data regarding the number of the

‘incipals Various types of high school organizations that are found in
5 to giv- Kentucky.

to enter Table I

“‘5 51“" TYPES OF HIGH SCHOOL ORGANIZATIONS AND NUMBER OF EACH
11:; resO- . ,vsc,” , ,, , , ,, , W. . . W. . A . . 4 ,

 

 

 

 

 

TYDes of Organization 15:31:38 11;:ggl-1t .lstvlh‘oilfi: | 1512331341 Total
e United , W .W Wei.._,,.._12‘5FIELJ ,,,_ _i,‘_,_ _
1:13: Grades 7—12....) 196 1 103 1 10 l 6 t 315
3811 have Grades 9—12.11 144 y '70 J 54 [ 2 270
p Grades 8—12.... 11 l 4 l 5 l 0 20
Grades 10—12..__‘ 1 l 9 I 1 l 0 11
Grades up to 11....] 3 | 0 l 1 l 0 4
Grades up to 10__,.| 14 I 4 I 2 l 0 20
Grades up to 9....1 17 | 24 l 0 l 0 41
AVi ‘ _,W.,W L7 i l . l 1
l l
Totals ________________ y. 386 i 214 l 73 1 8 681
A , l ‘ l '

 

 

  

 

 

The preceding table not only shows the mnnber of different
types of high schools that are found in the state but it also indicates
the number of high schools operating under different types of con—
trol. It will be noted that 886 are operated by county boards ol’ edu«
cation while 214 are maintained by independent districts. There has
been a decrease during the year of two high schools operated by
county boards of education and of one high school in independent
districts. This decrease has been offset by an increase of three in
the number of private high schools.

Of the 2386 county high schools. 374 are operated for white pupils
while 12 are maintained for colored. ()t' the 214 high schools found
in independent school districts. 52 are maintained for colored. ()t'
the state or regional high schools. six are For white pupils while two
are, for colored. (lne ot' the priyate high schools is operated l'or
colored pupils.

Table 11

HIGH SCHOOL ENROLLMENTS BY GRADES, RACE AND CONTROL

 

 

 

_Qouuty Independent l Stateor l Private,
Distrlcts Districts 1 Regional ‘
Grades, 1‘ iii Quili: V ‘ igifl;fl' 7w:‘ h 7 - v “#2 "ViiiAu; 1 THEN
1 s 1 z 1 p 1 z 1 s 1 z z : z 1
1 ; 1 1 5 ; 1
7 1 6,691l 751 7,9621 1,61411571 0‘1 1701 01 16,669
8 6,1591 631 7,4433 1,433'174‘ 0‘ 2693 0 15,541
9 1 1552311311 11,3871 207611711 861 3,2871 361, 32,697
10 1 10,1501 1251 8,4171 1,5801 1421 1041 2,6711 14; 23,203
11 1 8,6081, 80; 7,1261 124811703 981 2,1261 12; 19,468
12 1 6,0171 631 5,7791 1,03311271 551 1,7801 111 14,865
, , , ,,,,,,,,,,,'L 7, ,,‘,,,,1,, 1 ,1 g, _
1 1 1 1
7—12 l1 53,1481 5871 48,114l 8,9841941l 343i 10,303‘1 731 122,443
1 1 1 1 1 1 I I 1

. , ,,,“ ,,, , , , , _ , ,,,,” ,,,,7 1 1

peg: 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
centages 1 43.451 .451 39.331 7.29, .78 .211 8.431
1 1 , ' 1 :, l 1 1 , , 1‘,

ln_/'ornmliou ('ouccrniug High School [)1'1'cIo/nucul. The three
tables that follow should prove interesting to all who are concerned
with the development of secondary education in Kentucky.

'l‘able lll shows that there was a continuous growth in the num-
ber o'l“ high schools from lfllS to 19237). H was in lflIlS that the state
had its greatest number of high scllnolstlH. Since there are now
(1‘8l high schools, public and private. it is clear that there has been a

58

 

 

 ent
Utes
on-
du-
has

9111,
in

pils
ind
Of
two
for

‘h ree
rned

unn-
state

now
.‘611 :1

Table III

NUMBER OF HIGH SCHOOLS BY YEARS

i Public W'hite ; Public Colored‘ Private

 

  

 

 
 

  

 

 

5911001 Year ‘1 High Schools 1 High Schools i High Schools I Totals
l l l 1‘
1915-16 ........ __.l 316 l No report l No report i 316
1916-17 ...... ._g 376 g 32 g No report i 408
1918-19 ................ g 400 l 30 3 No report l 430
1922-23 ................ j 529 l 56 l No report l 585
1923-24.. _ ‘ 492 l 51 f 86 l 629
1924—25 496 l 50 l 84 l 630
1925-26 ................ 551 l 57 j 91 j 699
1926—27... ' 552 l 55 I 88 l 695
1927-28 607 l 64 g 98 y 769
1928-29 614 f 73 l 97 l 784
1930-31... 661 l 72 l 73 l 806
1931—32 ................ l 676 l 70 ' 86 l 832
1932-33 678 l 73 j 82 l 834
1933—34... 682 l 74 j 84 l 838
1934-35 684 l 75 l 89 i 848
1935-36 680 l 75 ' 83 l 833
1936—37... 663 j 78 l 77 l 813
1937—38 ................ r 652 g 80 l 76 l 808
1938—39 ' 628 | 80 I 75 l 783
1939—40... 605 l 78 l 75 l 758
1940-41 ................ l 592 l 74 l 72 l 738
1941-42 ................ 1 574 l 71 l 71 l 716
1942—43... 555 f 71 j 71 l 697
1943-44 .......... __ 541 l 70 f 70 7 681
1944—45 ................ l 542 ' 66 l 73 l 681
l 1 l

 

decrease in numbers of 167 since 1935. The decrease in the number
0f public high schools has resulted yery largely from their being
merged into larger school centers.

Table IV presents an interesting picture of the increase in high
school enrollments in the different types of high schools since 1915'
This broad statement should be modified. however, because 0119 Will
observe that the total high school enrollment of the state has been
decreasing since the school year of 1940-41. In that school year the
total high school enrollment was 144,447. This school year, 19:44—45.
the total enrollment is 122,443. or, in other words, a. decrease in the
state high school total enrollment of 22,004 in the four-year period.
.1 he high school enrollment for the current school year represents an
Increase of 575 over the total high school enrollment for last year.

59

 

    
 
   
      
   
 
 
    

 

 

 

 

 

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
    
 
  

 

 

 

 

 

Table IV
ENROLLMENT BY YEARS IN DIFFERENT TYPES OF
HIGH SCHOOLS '
scoo Too 1; P HP Toco
1 1 1

1914-15 ______________ 1 15,547 1 No report 1 No report 15,547
1915—16 ........... 18,850 1 1,054 1 No report 1 19,904
1916-17 ______________ 20,800 1 1,225 1 No report 1 22,025
1917—18 ______________ 22,929 1 1,209 1 No report 24,138
1918—19 ______ 1 21,255 1 1,218 1 No report 22,473
1920-21 ______________ ' 25,939 1 1,446 1 No report 27,385
1922—23 .............. ' 35,806 1 2,373 1 5,007 43,186
1923—24 ...... 38,575 1 2,586 1 6,548 47,709
1924-25 .............. 37,264 1 2,952 1 5,857 46,073
1925-26 .............. 42,416 1 1,929 1 7,168 51,513
1926—27 ______ 46,096 1 2,664 1 7,440 56,210
1927-28 .............. 1 50,368 1 3,516 1 8,835 62,719
1928—29 .............. 1 54,903 1 4,083 1 8,590 67,576
1929-30 ...... ..1 58,370 1 4,100 1 ............ 62,470
1930-31 ______________ 1 61,589 1 4,054 1 ............ 65,643
1931—32 .............. 1 67,268 1 4,677 1 ............ 71,945
*1932—33 ........... 1 *83,092 *6,994 1 *7,407 "597,493
1933—34 ...... 83,930 1 6,961 1 7,445 98,336
1934-35 ...... 88,583 1 7,983 1 7,846 1 104,412
1935—36 ...... 101,017 1 6,546 1 8,173 1 115,735
1936-37 ..... .1 106,799 1 8,711 1 8,994 1 124,504
1937—38 .......... 109,587 1 8,938 1 9,610 1 128,135
1938-39 .............. 1 117,284 1 9,587 1 9,166 1 136,037
1939—40 .............. 1 121,204 1 10,342 1 9,999 1 141,545
1940—41 ..... 1 123,822 1 10,440 1 10,185 1 144,447
1941—42 .............. 1 119,398 1 10,173 1 10,339 1 139,910
1942—43 ______________ 1 113,662 1 9,947 1 10,048 1 133,657
1943—44 ..... 102,546 1 9,422 1 9,900 1 121,868
1944—45 .............. 1 102,619 1 9,448 1 10,376 1 122,443

7, if 71* 1 1 |

* Beginning with the sehool-yenr 1932—33, the enrollment of the seventh and
eight grades of six—year high schools and of junior high schools are included in

 

the totals.

There has been an increase 01’ 99 in the total enrollment for public
white and colored high schools and 476 for private secondary schools.
The significant decrease in our high school enrollment since 1941 is,
of course, accounted for by induction of boys into the Armed Forces,
by boys and girls taking jobs in business and industry, and by the
replacement of 1112111power by boys and girls on farms.

60

 Table V
HIGH SCHOOLS ACCREDITED THROUGH GRADE T‘VELVE,

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
  
 

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

 

 

1909—1945
$011001 Ye“? P5111211? $260181? 1147;757:8133? Higgggligois Totals

ans 1909-10 ................ 54 No report 29 83
#_ 1910-11 ............... 69 i No report 32 101

1911-12.. .. 85 No report 33 118
547 1912—13 ................ 100 No report 34 134
904 1913-14 ________________ 123 No report 38 162
325 1914—15.. 134 No report 41 175
138 1915-16 ________________ 149 No report 45 194
473 1916-17 ................ 171 No report 50 221
385 1917-18 ...... 185 No report 52 237
186 1918-19 ________________ 201 No report 52 253
709 1919-20 ................ 220 No report 55 275
073 225 No report 57 282
513 1921-22 ................ 228 No report 55 283
210 1922—23 ................ 263 7 61 331
719 1923-24 ..... 286 8 69 363
576 1924-25 ................ 311 11 68 390
470 1925-26 ................ 342 14 73 429
643 1926-27 ..... 382 14 80 476
945 1927-28 ................ 415 13 83 511
493 1928-29 ................ 457 16 87 560
336 1929—30 ..... 491 18 i 89 598
412 1930-31 ................ 522 26 1 91 639
735 1931-32 ................ 527 34 1 84 645
504 1932-33 _____ 539 35 ‘83 648
135 1933-34 ............. 535 34 82 651
037 1934-35 ................ 529 34 84 647
545 1935—36 ..... 559 51 77 687
447 1936—37 ................ 558 54 78 690
910 1937—38 ................ 546 56 75 677
657 1938—39 ..... 543 60 73 676
1868 1939-40 ..... 529 59 73 661
443 1940—41 ..... 516 61 72 649

1941-42 _____________ 510 56 70 636

1942-43 ............. 500 54 70 626
1th and 494 55 69 618
"“9“ ‘“ 490 56 70 | 616

i i J

public
chools. The table above shows the situation as regards the number of
941 is‘ accredited high Schools by years since 1910. \Vhen one thinks of a
Forces, high school in its true sense one thinks of an institution that, provides
By the its students a program of work through the twelfth grade. High

61

 

 schools that are organized to give work that does not extend through
the twelfth grade should be looked upon as incomplete, feeder schools
for regularly organized high schools; i.e.. schools that offer pupils a
program through the twelfth grade.

The high schools in Kentucky are accredited by the State Board.
of Education. This applies to both public and private schools. .ln
arriving at the official ratings given the high schools the State Board
of Education usually follows the recommendations of the Commission
on Secondary Schools of the Kentucky Association of Colleges and
Secondard Schools. The members of this Commission meet with the
Public School Supervisors and canvas the annual high school reports
that are made to the State Department of Education and also the
reports of the Supervisors’ inspections. This year it was the policy
of the Commission and also the State Board of Education to maintain
school standards unimpaired for the future but to apply them with
liberality during the present war emergency. In accordance with
this policy some schools, it will be noted, continue their A 01' B ac-
credited classifications but continue them on (m mnergcncy basis. It
will be noted that these schools are rated for accrediting purposes
either as class AE schools or 3E schools.

Teachers. There are 5,616 teachers employed in public and
private high schools of the state. Of this number, 2,349 are employed
to teach in county high schools while 2,600 are employed for high
schools that are located in independent school districts. There are
584 teachers employed in the pri 'ate high schools and 83 in high
schools that are operated by the state.

62

 

 hl'ough
schools
mils a

Board
Is. .111
Board
fission
as and
th The
eports
so the
policy
intain
1 with

with
B ac-
is. It
"poses

: and
Joyed
high
9 are
[1 ig'h

 

  

 

 

 

 

KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOLS—194445

High School Enrollment by Grades ,. iL'b ‘ tar
Distri ~t K 3% , i rary ~. - .__. .
$011501 F i l i Tchs. . 2 Appro- fi»:(,110011315111( t
1.2 E Total! .. _ priation Hi I

Pupils. Tchs.
AgAIR COUNTY i ' M
ountnynifley ‘
Colurnbla .. 37 3 321i 1: .. ..
“lute A. ‘ “ ‘ “‘
Colored .. . I , aim "
u

ALLEN COUNTY
Co. H._ S. (Scottsville)
Scottswlle

ANDERSON COUNTY
County
Kavanaugh (Lawrenceburg)
\Vestern (Sinai) .
Lawrenceburg
“'hite
Colored

 

Maximum

BALLARD COUNTY

County
Bandana
Barlow
Blandville
Kevil
LaCenter W
LaCenter C
“'ickliffe

BARREN COUNTY
County
Austin-Tracy (Austin)
Hiseville
Park City ..
Temple Hill (Glasgow).
Cave Clty
Glasgow
W'hite
Colored

BATH COUNTY
County

 

 

 

$HA$M$$E

 

.5014 Hm
cowmro’oxiwow
...

H—A
wwwowwxw-Aq

 

w
L!__

Bethe]

Owingsville

Sa.t Lick
Sharpsburg

BELL COUNTY
County
Balkan .
Bell Co. H. S. (Pineville)._
Henderson Settl. (Frakes)
Pruden (Pruden, Tenn.)
Red Bird (Beverly)
Lone Jack (Four Mile).
Middlesboro
White .
Colored
Pineville
White
Colored

BOON E CO U N TY
County
Burlington
Florence
c: Hebron
U1 New Haven

 

 

Walton

 

 

ED
N

County .

Center Hill (Pg

Clintonville

)[illersburg

N, Middletown

Paris

VVhite

Colored ..

Millersburg Mil. Inst. (P12).

 

l—IN
mmuqmmawm

 

 

exeqummw

wwwdwiom

 

 

 

i

I

I

l

l
"l
BOURBON COUNTY l
ml
|

l

I

I

l

I

.I
l

* Interpretation of 'High School Ratings.
A—Accredited through the entire high school course (through grade twelve).
B—Accredited through the entire high school course (through grade twelve).

11Gr.—Accredited through grade eleven.

10 (in—Accredited through grade ten.

9 Gr.—Junior high school—recognized through grade nine.

T—«This initial when attached to the designated of any rating indicates that such rating is given in the face of some deficiency,
that it is temporary for this year only. and that the school should be discontinued at the close of this school year or re-
organized in full compliance with regulations for accrediting.

E—This initial suggests that an emergency is recognized to exist that may justify the operation of the school even with an observed
shortage in the number of pupils or of teachers. U—Uiiaccredited.

 

  

 

 

KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOLS—lQ44-45—Continued

 

High School Enrollment by Grades l
1 .

l

l

County .( - wk
District thlng,

School

. . ' Elementary
i Term] lerary School District
l i l | i Tchs. 1n Appro- ‘
9 10 l I 12 ITOtal Mos. , - prlation
1 1

 

w
L

l l

I, a .__
h V R | I
BOYD COUNTY

l l
’ 375i 1,462l 37
, . H. S. (Ashland) _ . I l " . ’ _‘ 360 .
England Hill (Catlettsburg)
Ashland .
White
Colored
(,‘oles Jr.
Putnam J .
Catlettsburg
Fairview (Ashland) .
Holy Family (Ashland) (Pr.)

Pupils Tchs. lTerm

BOYLE COUNTY
County ...........................................
a: Forkland (Gravel Switch)
0: Junction City
Parksville
Perryville
Danville
\Vhite .,
Colored

_.
C—V’A—llfll—‘l‘é—‘m
*D—IN
L.
_.
_\

V-‘KImwr/J
gamut—
...
“\RK

Heaow—I
Ul-hfl‘clolkl
[\7

.DD

BRACK EN COUNTY
County
Brooksville
(lermantown
Milford
\Vestern (Bradford)

H
Hui-‘8

.c-

known—neg
Noni-1w *
AlfiHlfl/Dv’m
unduly-Iowa

U1:

 

BREATHITT COUNTY

Co. H. S. (Jackson) .

Jackson ........................... ..
Highland Inst. (Guerrant) (
Magoffin inst. (Sky) (Pr.)._
Mt. Carmel (Lawson) (P12.
Oakdale

Riverside Inst. (Lost Cr.) (P1,)

 

 

wwowwwo

BRECKINRIDGE COUNTY
County
Hardi n sh u rg—W .
Hardinsburg~C.
Irvingtnn
Cloverport

BULLIT COUNTY
County
Mt. “'ashington
Shepherdsville .
Lebanon Junction

BUTLER COUNTY
County
Morganto
Rochester

CALDWELL COUNTY
County
Cobb ,,
Fredonia
Princ’eton
White
Colored

H a on M N 43
“‘ *‘:::IE___

 

CALLOWAY COUNTY
County
Almo ,,
Faxon
Hazel
Kirksey
Lynn Gime
New (‘rmcnrd
Murray
\Vhite
Colored _ _ ,
Murray College Trg. Sch. (St.)._..v

CAMPBELL COUNTY
County ,,,,,, ,,

Alexandria

California
Bellevue .

Cold Spring

Dayton

Ft. Thomas
Newport -
Silver Grove . 19' 18“

 

I—‘h—ll—Al—l

)—|._\
.mouau.:—m+-aahmoo

 

N ‘3
ulcozby'sqmmwi-A'
.1

H—l
N.

N
ANNQDNOU‘V

 

 

(ION—I

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOLS—1944—45—Continued

 

 

 

 

County
District
School

Rating*
1945

High School Enrollment by Grades

 

Elementary

Library
Appro-
Dl ”no“ Pupils I Tchs.

School Distri’ct

T e rm

 

Southgate ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,

Newport Catholic (Pr.) ,

Notre Dame of Providence
(Newport) (Pr.)

CARLISLE COUNTY
County
Arlington
Bardwell
Cunningham
Millmrn

CARROLL COUNTY
County—Sanders
Carrollton

CARTER COUNTY
County
Carter
(‘zrahn
Gruyson
Hitchins .
Olive Hill
Soldier W
Upper T}ga1t _
Erie (Olive Hill) CPI.) .

CASEY COUNTY
County
Liberty
Middleburg

CHRISTIAN COUNTY
County

Lacy (Hopkinsville) w

Sinking Fork (Hopkin.

So. Christian (Herndon)
Crofton
Hopkinsville

\Vhite

Colored

Pembroke
CLARK COUNTY