xt70zp3vtd1f https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt70zp3vtd1f/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19200312  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, March 12, 1920 text The Kentucky Kernel, March 12, 1920 1920 2012 true xt70zp3vtd1f section xt70zp3vtd1f if

i

The Kentucky Kernel
UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY
LEXINGTON, KY., MAR. 12, 1920

VOL. X.

TO NEW COUNCIL TO HAVE

SMITH IS WINNER

FOR CONTEST CONTROL

OF CHAMPI

OF

ATHLETICS

No. 21

WOMAN'S

UNIVERSITY FACULTY
CLUB

ORGANIZED

LEAGUE

HAVE SECONDi

HERE

U. K. Representative Comes Drawings Must Be In Next Students, Alumni, Faculty Initial Meeting Held Mon- Constitution To Be Adoptday Night
ed; Officers Nominated
Week
First In Second
Members and University
Contest
Officials to Form Body
Thirty-ninmembers of tho teach- MRS. McVEY TO SPEAK
In response to the request contain-

r

e

WILL

"is

-

AGAIN

Kentucky exhibited
her prowess
once more in that one of many arts
through which she has been made
when the University
of Kentucky won the championship of
the South in the first annual contest
of the Southern League in the University chapel, Friday night. Clifford E.
Smith represented the University of
Kentucky, speaking on "The Shantung Question."
Wllllm H. Bobbitt, University of
North Carolina, came second in the
contest, and George Goetz, Johns Hopkins University, finished third. Their
subjects were respectfully, "The Present Crisis in American Democracy,"
and 'Radicalism and Free Speech."
Others who competed were: Dewey
Wnltnell, Vanderbllt University, "Our
Unloyal People"; Meyer Lovenstein,
University of Virginia, "The Alternative to Bolshevism"; "Radicalism and
Free Speech"; William McCall, Uni- verslty of Alabama, "The College
Man's Opportunities."
Smith first covered himself with
glory when he won the State championship last Monday night over rep- resentatives from five other Kentucky
colleges. He will next represent the
State in a contest with the winners of
the contests in Ohio, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota and Wisconsin to be
held April 7. At a later date he will
be the Kentucky representative in a
contest with North and South Dakota,
Nebraska, Iowa, Kansas and Missouri.
The contest was delayed because of
the late arrival of one of the contestants and was not over until after midnight. The judges who rendered the
decision were Professor B. C. Van
Wye, University of Cincinnati; Professor H. S. Woodward, Western Reserve University, Cleveland, and Professor C. H. Thurber, Purdue University.
Much of the good work accomplish-ein these oratorical contests has
been due to the diligence and inter-eaexhibited by Professor Mabie, who
is In charge of the work in oratory
In" the University.
famous-r-oratory-

41

SPEAK

,

--

d

t'

last week's issuo of the Kernel
several of the artists of the Univered in

'

sity are preparing drawings to be submitted in the contest for the best design for the Stroller program. This
contest, which is conducted each year
by tho Strollers, has always created
interest and many students have
shown their interest by submitting
designs.
Besides the natural desire of the
s
students to aid all University
there is the added inducement
in this contest of two of the best
seats in the Opera House to the artist who submits the best design. It
is to be remembered that these drawings must be in the hands of the committee before the end of next week
and those who are contemplating entering a design should lose no time in
putting it into shape.
Information regarding the contest
can be obtained from Emery Frazie:
or any member of the cast of "The
Climbers." The committee, composed
of Professor
Enoch Grehan, Emery
Frazler and Horndon Evans, will examine the drawings and announce the
winner at the close of the contest.
The management reserves the right
to keep all drawings submitted.
Plans for the sale of seats are being
made and it 4s probable that all details for the opening will be made
'vithin the next few days. The four
boxes at the Opera House were engaged by different organizations of
tho University
last semester, but
there will be- plenty of available seats.
The management is expecting every
seat to be sold a short time after the
tickets are issued, as Stroller productions are growing In popularity with
each year.
The members of the cast are working night and day, rounding the play
into shape and it can be safely said
from the display of talent that this
will be one of the best amateur performances seen here in years.
organf-nation-

-

CENTER COLLEGE MM
SPEAKS AT y. MEETING

UNIVERSITY WOMANS Dr. Ganfield Gives InspiraCLUB MEETS FRIDAY tional Talk; Community
Singing Feature
The University Woman's Club will
hold its regular monthly meeting Friday at 3:30 o'clock in the Recreation
Room of Patterson Hall. Important
business matters will be discussed,
and Miss Josephine Simrall will deliver an address on "Woman and the
New Educational Issues."

Patronize Our Advertiser!

1

exerFollowing the devotional
cises led by Bob Davis at the joint
V. W. and Y. M. C. A. meeting at Patterson Hall Sunday night, Dr. W. A.
Ganfield, of Centre College, spoke on
"Great Spirits of the Past Who Did
Not Fall." Mr. Nolan, from Cincinnati, who was a leader of community

(Continued on Page Two)

ing staff of the University and the
Experimental Station met Monday
PL'ANS FOR "K"
night in the "Little Theatre" at 8 p.
Radical changes In the governing m. incident to a call by Dr. Glanville
body of athletics have been made by Terrell, chairman of a committee apthe action of the senate of the Uni- pointed by the University Senate at a
versity of Kentucky upon the recom- recent meeting, looking toward the
mendation of the senate committee formation of a University Faculty
appointed some time ago to investi- Club.
Dr. Glanville Terrell was elected
gate the athletic situation. The committee was composed of S. A. Boles, chairman and Professor Enoch GreProf. Enoch Grehan, and Major Pres- han, head of the Department of Jourley T. Atkins, of Louisville, an alum- nalism, was elected secretary and

house

nus.
In accordance
with the recommendations of the committee the
Athletic Association
who formerly
had control of athletics passes out of
existence and in its place an athletic
council is formed to be appointed by
the President of the University and
to consist of the president, the director of athletics, three faculty
members, two students, and three
citizens of Lexington and Fayette
county either alumni of the University or other men interested in athletics at the University. The terms
of all the members of the council will
be for a period of three years except
those of the students which shall be
of athletics, the president however
for a period of one year.
The council shall have full control
retaining the right to vote. The duties of the council shall be: to be
responsible for the welfare and good
character of athletics at the University; to formulate and direct the
general athletic policy; to promulgate
regulations for the awards of "letters" to the players on the various
teams, football, basketball, baseball
girl's basketball,
men's basketball,
tennis, and track; to pass upon the
eligibility of players, in which case the
student members of the council shall
have no vote; to support high school
tournaments; to take steps to attract
to the University on as many occasions as possible the alumni; and to
establish and provide for the maintenance of a trophy room in which pictures, records of athletic teams and
other trophies of athletic achievement may be kept. The athletic council shall have full charge of providing
proper coaches for the teams and it is
suggested that a football coach of national reputation be procured.
The investigating committee also
recommends to the attention of the
new council the building in the near
future of a concrete stadium; the better equipment of the gymnasium; and
the building of a "K" house in which
the teams may be quartered during
their respective training seasons, and
where they may have their meals at
a training table with strict discipline
maintained.

treasurer.
Following the election of officers a
general discussion of a plan of organ
ization and purposes of the club was
held with short speeches by Dr. TerJudge
Wellington
rell,
Patrick,
Judge
Chalkley, Professor Welst,
Lafferty, Dean P. P. Boyd, Professor
Summers, Professor A. N. Miller, Pres
ident McVey and Professor W. D.
and others, presenting their views
concerning the purposes and the best
plans for organizing the club.
The Senate Committee was author
ized to prepare definite plans and a
tentative constitution to be presented
at a future meeting. Refreshments
were served.
The following, with others who will
Join at the next meeting will be classed as charter members:
President Frank L. McVey, Dr. Glan-- .
ville Terrell, Professor W. L. Sum
Val-lea- u

(Continued on Pago 7)

DR. D. L. THOMAS DIES
Head of English Department of
tre College Succumbs.

Cen-

Danville, Ky., March 8 (Associated
Dr. Daniel Lindsay Thomas,
40 years old, head of the English Department of Centre College, is dead
here following an operation. He was
president of the Kentucky Folklore
Society and has written considerably
on the subject.
Dr. Thomas was a
native of Lebanon, Ky. After his graduation in 1900 from Centre College, he
was assistant principal in the Danville
city schools for two years. Receiving
his M. A. degree at Centre, he took a
course at Princeton,
where he won the Charles Scribner
Fellowship In English two years. With
the degree of Ph. D. from Princeton, he
studied at Munich and Oxford in 1906
and 1907. He was assistant professor
of English at the University of Kansas in 1908 and 1909 and in the latter
year came to Centre. He was with
the Y. M. IC. A. educational forces In
France during the war and was head
of the English department at the A.
E. F. University at Dijon. His relatives live in Lebanon, where he will
be burled.

Press).

e

The second meeting of the Woman's
League will be held Monday morning,
March 15, during the fifth period, in
the Little Theater. Mrs. F. L. McVey
will speak on the purpose and value of
having such an organization in the
University. Among the important
business matters to be brought up will
be the adoption of a constitution and
the appointmnt of a nominating com
mittee to select the candidates for offices in the League.
The initial meeting of this organiza
tion was held several weeks ago, in a
mass meeting of all the women students of the University, following the
acceptance of a petition which was
submitted to the faculty, stating the
fact that the women of the University
felt the need or an organization of
this kind, which would unify the body
of women students by bringing together the town girls and those living
in the dormitories.
One of the purposes of the League, as suggested at
that meeting, was to bring to the
University certain notable experts on
vocations for women.
The work of organization was begun at that time, by the appointment
of a committee, consisting of Mary
Van Meter and Louise Will, who with
cne other member to be selected by
Ihom, .jvere to write a constitution to
be submitted to the body of women
students at the next meeting. It Js
hoped that officers may be elected at
an early date, in order that the work
of the League may be well under way
before the end of this school year.
Mrs. McVey, who is to be the speaker at this meeting, has obtained by
experience a thorough knowledge of
the work and aims of Woman's
Leagues. Every woman student of the
University is urged to be present Monday morning, at this probably
meeting of the League.

MEN TO
HAVE OFFER OF FUND

EX-SERVI-

Special Courses In Any
School.
Through provision of the Scholarship Fund of the National War Work
Council of the Y. M. C. A., it is possailor, or masible for any
rine to get permanent help which will
enable him to take special courses in
any school to which he may desire to
May Take

go.

The amount of financial aid will be
by district committees.
determined
Students may receive instruction in
courses in agriculture, bookkeeping,
shorthand, medicine, law and any othare
er subject. Those interested
urged to call on Professor Melcher, to
receive further Information concerning this project.

Hp!''

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL

iPAGE 2
(CONCERTS DAILY, AFTERNOON AND EVENING

STRAND ALL AMERICAN
ORCHESTRA

(THE

r The

STRAND

Open 10 A. M. to

Best Orchestra In the South"
Everybody Saya So.

P. M.

Adults

--

.

11

APPRECIATES

McVEY.

"Doctor Frank L. McVcy, president
of tho University of Kentucky, Js ono
(pt the South'B grentcst orators," says
tho "Gamecock," student publication
ofitho University of! South Carolina,
in n sVotcli of President" RtcVcy prior
in lila" ndflrnna ninrln nt llirt Pnitllilnrs'
JStvyKxerclscs in Columbus, January
'

j

15th.

"No speaker comes to us in recent
years," contlnuo the "Gamecock,"
"more highly recommended than the
ono wo are to hear tonight. His entire life has been spent in a thorough
study of his chosen profession; all
his efforts have been directed to the
upbuilding of one of the most important studies of modern times."

'
'

COMPROMISE WINS IN
REFERENDUM.

New York, Jan. 16. Advocates of
ratification of the peace treaty by
compromise headed the poll in the
complete returns of the Intercollegiate
referendum which were made public
here tonight. They led by a small
margin of voters who have favored
for
ratification without reservation
amendment.
According to the revised figures the
referendum was voted upon in 410
colleges and universities and 139,788
votes were cast with the following results:
Compromise reservations. . .49,653
Ratification without reserva- 48,232
tion
(
Ratification with the Lodge
f
27,970
reservation
Opposition to the treaty in
any form
13.933

27c, plus 3c War Tax, Total 30c.

REMEMBER

singing In War Camp Community
What causes the shedding of many a Servlco work during tho wnr, took up
Iho rest of tho hour with some spirtear.
'
typewriters. ited demonstrations
,
of playing nnd
'TIs those
singing..
You think that you're pecking gaily
"I'd a thousand times rather that
my grandchild should be proud of his
along,
When all of a sudden tho ribbon goes grandfather than that I should bo
wrong,
proud of mine," said Dr. Ganflold In
And then for a spell is hushed the his address. "Christ could have failed
song,
but Ho did not. What would have be, typewriter.
,
come of the human raco if Noah had
,
Of tho
failed? What would It havo meant
And after you've properly treated the
to the world If Abraham had been
case,
content with his home surroundings;
And start out again at a rapid pace,
if Joseph had been afraid to interpret
You are liable to find that it won't
Nebuchadnezzar's dream aright? What
space,
would have been the result if Moses
, typewriter!
,
,
Oh, that
had lacked faith; if David had had a
yellow streak? Today we thank God
And after you've tried each one In the
for the splendid courage and spiritroom,
uality of Martin Luther. England and
And unwritten stories before you loom
Scotland will never forget John Knox
And you hear Miss Margie
nor will they cease to be proud of his
your doom
wonderful ministry.
,
,
Say, don't you bless that
"I wouldn't exchange for a strong,
, typewriter?
simple faith in Christ, all the joys
RAVIN'.
and pleasures, all the dissipations and
wealth 'of this world," concluded the
Agricultural Society.
speaker.
Agricultural Society held its
The
During the social hour refreshments
regular weekly meeting Monday night
of ice cream, cakes and nuts were
at 7:30 o'clock in the Agricultural
served.
Building. Jack Dorr made a talk on
"An Adventure," relating some of his
experiences in Kansas. "Farming in
W. B. GRIGGS
Belgium" was the subject of an inOpposite Agriculture Building
teresting paper written by Smith Gill. CIGARS, CIGARETTES, TOBACCO
The program was completed by a talk
AND SOFT DRNK8
by Professor Kelly on "Pep" and an
STEP IN AND SEE ME
informal talk by Dean Cooper on
things of general interest to the society.
A social hour followed the program,
of hot
during which refreshments
chocolate and wafers were served.

FOR THE COLLEGE STUDENTS

drear

I

"THE BEST IN MOVING PICTURES"

THE CLASSY PLACE

(Continued from Pngo Ono)

What makes tho life of a journalist
CAROLINA

Children, 18c, plus War fax, Total 20c.

SPEAKS AT "Y." MEETING

RAVIN'S OF A JOURNALIST.
Listen to me and you Bhall hear

EXCHANGES

Admlislon

HOME OF

Paramount, Artcraft, Metro, Realart,
Goldwin and Select Pictures.

HOME-MAD-

CANDIES AND LUNCHES

E

McGurk & O'Brien
"EVERYTHING NEW"

PHOENIX FRUIT STORE
FOR FRUITS, CANDIES, NUTS
PHOENIX BLOCK
BECKER DRY CLEANING CO.

Cleaners
That

Satisfy

WE ARE ALWAYS ON THE JOB WHEN YOU WANT ANYTHING
CLEANED, PRESSED OR REPAIRED.
PHONE

821--

Cropper's Laundry
(Incorporated)

PHONE 210

114 N. UPPER

if

-

C. D. CALLOWAY & CO.
FOOTBALL SUPPLIES, SWEATERS, KODAKS,
DEVELOPING AND PRINTING
t4S West Main

Lxlnton,

Street

Ky.

COLLEGE MEN
Here Are The New
Things for Spring
NEW

SMARTLY-STYLDE-

SUITS-N- EW

R

HATS AND SHOES-N- EW
MANHATTAN SHIRTS-N- EW
HOSE AND SCARFS
Ask to see the new Braxton Belt, it fits snugly
without binding, new cordovan, seal and
n
leathers. Special at $2.25.
pig-ski-

h
hats for
dressers.
Fitting crowns for fastidious men.
The new Spring styles are perfect combinations
of style, quality and value.
Men who demand distinctive Hats will find just
the shape, shade and quality they want here now.
Soft Hats and Derbies that you will enjoy seeTip-to- p

top-notc-

ing and wearing.

United (Jotfiin

Store

INCORPORATED

JM

BBBBBBi!iBBBBBBiliii!i,iS

Special Display also of WHITE DUCK TROUSERS, suitable for outing and tennis wear.

Graves, cox& Co.
ImcorporaUl

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL
L. C. ARMSTRONG IS
HEARD BY ENGINEERS

PAGE 8

Down Town

MEMORY BOOKS .$4.50.

Noted Cxptorer Relates Thrilling

KODAK ALBUMS 50 Cents ot $8.00.

PENNANTS $1.00 and up.
L. O. Armstrong,

of tho Bureau of
Commercial Economics, addressed tho
students of tho University Thursday
afternoon on his experiences as an
explorer In tho Northland.
Mr. Armstrong Is 70 years of age
and has spent tho greater part of his
life as an explorer, hunter and guide,
and is now more youthful and vigorous than most men in tho prime of
life. He has explored every nook and
corner of the United States and Canada, having blazed his own trail on
many of his trips.
Many notable
men of America are among his intimate friends.
.'

Faculty
Club,
The Engineering
through whose efforts Mr. Armstrong
was brought here, greatly appreciated
the rare privilege of hearing of his
remarkable experiences.
The grand
old man told a few of the stirring recollections of his Klondyke days, of a
miraculous escape for death on a
Canadian lake, and an absorbing latter-day
story of German intrigue on
this continent.

Meeting Place

Orders taken for special College and
Pennants and Banners.

for

FRATERNITY STATIONERY
If we haven't your Fraternity Paper we can
get it for you.

University Boys

COLLEGE STATIONERY,
DANCE INVITATIONS,
DANCE PROGRAMMES
SENIORS, ATTENTION!
Please leave your order now for Caps and
Gowns, also engraved cards.

Open Until 8 P. M. Every Evening

High Class
Haberdashery
College Boys Styles in Our Special Designed Clothes

university Bookstore

DOBBS FIFTH AVENUE HATS
MANHATTAN SHIRTS

ft

Basement Main Building.

233 West Short St.

Most Complete Assortment of Silk Shirts
We Earnestly Solicit Your Patronage

In conclusion, Mr. Armstrong stated

that the University of Kentucky has
a spirit that excels that of any other
school of the many he has visited on
his lecture tour. He also said that
"My Old Kentucky Home" was a song
that appealed to men of all classes
and 13 as popular in the wilds of Canada as it is in the far Southland.

GUEST
OF HONOR AT PARTIES

FORMER

Geddes & Luigart

Mammoth Garage Co.

Phoenix Block
GEO. GEDDES

(Incorporated)

GENE SULLIVAN
"Let's Get Acquainted"

CO-E- D

Alpha Gamma Deltas Give Showers
For Alumna.
Mrs. Joseph Howard, formerly Miss
,Ruth Cassidy, a student in the University, and a recent bride, was the
guest of honor at several parties given
last week.
Lillian Haydon entertained in her
honor with a miscellaneous shower
Monday afternoon at her home on the
Maysville tPJke. The house was athearts,
with
tractively
decorated
cuplds and cut flowers. The presents
which were tied up in tissue paper
were arranged in a basket placed on
the library table. Tied to each present was a long strip of red ribbon
which had a card fastened to the other end. Each guest was required to
write on the card suggestions for
managing a husband and then to draw
the present. A salad course and mints
were served.
Myrtle Rose Smith entertained
Tuesday afternoon with an "Advice"
shower and many clever and original
bits of advice In the form of prose,
poetry and sketches were showered
upon the guest of honor. An ice
course and coffee were served.
Thursday afternoon, Mrs. O. P.
Floyd entertained with a tea towel
party at her home on East Main
Each guest brought a tea
Street.
towel which she was required to make
during the afternoon. A prize awarded for the most attractive towel was
won by Mrs. Frederick Wachs. Reof a salad
freshments consisting
.course and mints were served.
The guests at th&Be affairs included the alumnae, active members and
pledges of Alpha Gamma Delta and
the following other guests: Mrs.
Frederick Wachs, Mrs. David Howard,
jMtsses Phoebe Button, Kate Reddish,
Dorothy Jackson, Pearl Haydon.

GEO. LUGIART

Studehaker
Automobiles
That Good Gulf Gasoline
and Supreme Auto Oils

Ours is the Quality Shop
The finest and most complete exclusively retail Optical establishment
anywhere in the South.
A faHMkl and accurate Optical Service in all its branches.
EYES examined by an Optometrist intimately familiar with the most
Intricate problems of refraction.
The grinding of the lenses, the expert fitting andally.other details
are accomplished within our establishment.
WE FEATURE ONE DAY SERVICE

Fayette Optical Shop
Everything for the Automobile

H. CLAY

East Main Street.

Dick Webb, President.

Lexington, Ky.

Phone 3972

W. Main St.

313-31- 5

ODENBAUGH,

Optometrist

WELSH & MURRAY PRINTING CO.
COLLEGE STATIONERY

GRADDY-RYANDC-

ENGRAVING

131
O.

AND

Incorporated

DIE STAMPING
THE COLLEGE BOYS' STORE

FRAT and DANCE PROGRAMS

Clothing, Furnishings, Hats, Shoes and Tailoring

LEXINGTON, KY.

N. LIMESTONE

124--1

Planoa

PHONE 592

Columbia Grafonolas

Established

Player Pianos

DE LUXE
'Ladies' and Gents' Tailors

Aeolian-Vocallo-

Unto

tank 4 Trust lulMlftf , 2nd Flttr
Ltxlnften,

Ky.

'

'
Pht

Jr

1899

The E. C. Christian Music Co.

P. ANQELUCCI

Competent Home Tailori '

n

Records
Musical Instrument
Player Rolls
, Sheet Music

1770-- Y
205-20-

7

Everything Pertaining to Music
Moving, Tuning, Repairing and Refinishing
Piano a Specialty
Lexington, Ky.
East Main

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL

PAGE 4

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL
Published every Frldny throughout tlio College year by the student body
of tho University of Kentucky, for the benefit of tlio students,
nluinnl nnd faculty of the Institution.
Tho Kentucky Kernel Is tho offlcinl newspaper of the University. It
is issued with a view of furnishing to Its subscribers all tho college news
of Kentucky, together with a digest of items of Interest concerning the
Universities of other States and Canada.
SUBSCRIPTION, ONE DOLLAR AND FIFTY CENTS A YEAR.
FIVE CENTS THE COPY.
mall matter.
Entered at Lexington Postofflco as second-class

EDITORIAL STAFF.
A. GAVIN NOUMI2NT.
Louise Will

over-zealou- s

..EDITOR-IN-CHIE-

Managing Editor
Managing Editor
Editor
.Squirrel Food Editor
..Sport Editor
Exchange Editor
.Foaturo Editor

.Assistant

Robert Itntblo
Adele Slade
Mary Elizabeth James.
Donald Dinning
Margaret McClure
Frances Marsh .

Co-e-

REPORTERS.
Elizabeth Marshall, Elizabeth Card, Mary Archer Bell, James A. Dixon.
Margaret Smith, Martha Buckman, Robert Mitchel, Terril Corn.
Harry Cottrell, Arthur Hodges, Adalino Mann.
BUSINESS STAFF.
Business Manager
J. P. Barnes
Circulation Manager
H. B. Loyd
Assistants
J. Burton Prowitt, Gilbert Smith
FACULTY

CLUB COMMENDABLE

STEP.

Faculty members are human beings. Startling as this statement may
seem at first glance, to some students, dt is nevertheless true. As such
they have certain inalienable and defensible rights that must bo respected.
One of these rights is that of associating in fellowship with others of like
status. Another is that of thinking his own thoughts and expressing them
on appropriate occasions in his own way.
It is with a view of asserting these fundamental rights of faculty members that certain professors and agents of the University have assembled
and organized a club, to be called Tho University Club. The Kernel takes
pleasure in welcoming this new organization to the campus. We wish it
all success.
If we are not mistaken, it is the purpose of this club to promote friendly relations among the members and to exist as a discussion center for
educational problems of the school and the State. The Kernel cannot
heartily enough commend both these aims. Too long has the university
professor been regarded as either an Intellectual tyrant o ran
encyclopedia. The remark with which we opened this animadversion
was meant in all seriousness, and the tone of flippancy which perhaps
could be found in its expression was merely on the surface. If the stu- dents of the University would taKe the trouble to make a closer acquaint
ance with their instructors than is possible in the classroom, the fine
friendship and broad friendliness which they would surely find, would most
amply repay them.
Professors have homes, on the average of higher quality, both in intellectual tone and in human sympathetic qualities higher than is known by
the average student. Our professors are gentlemen in the finest sense of
that word, ready to meet the student more than half way and give more
than he gets.
But the teacher in a university needs the companionship of minds
commensurate with his own in power and training, and to a deplorable
extent the opportunity to satisfy this need is lacking. In many cases the
circle of acquaintance is restricted to departments or at most, colleges.
This is a serious defect and one which the present effort is intended to cor- rect. It will, if successful, not only increase the joys, few as we conceive
them to be, of a professor's life, but they will at the same time increase
the efficiency of the faculty.
There is also the matter of discussion of educational problems. This
will be the largest field of outside usefulness which this club will be able
to touch. If the men who must meet these problems cannot solve them,
nobody can. Experience and ability and willingness they will bring to
the task, and their opinions should be the weightiest in determining the
action of functional bodies.
With these considerations moving us and a human sympathy warming our hearts to this enterprise, the Kernel again welcomes The University Club to our midst, and wish it full success in all its plans for the
future.
absent-minde-

m

CLEAN

SPORTS

meeting nnd tho plan suggested was adopted. Tho Council which will bo
formed is to bo thoroughly representative, nnd Is to bo composed of cloven
members, Including nlumnl, citizens of Lexington, students, and faculty
members. Council appointments nro entirely In the hnnds of tho President of tho University.
One of tho purposes of tho work hoped to bo accomplished by tho
council Is tho nttninmont of cleaner sports in University athletics, by enforcing rigidly tho rulc3 of tho S. I. A. A., which provide that men must
bo matriculated and in good standing In their classes before they nro eligible to become members of athletic teams.
Tho Kernel recalls with regret, that nt times pernicious nctivlties on
champions of tho University have led to abuse of
tho part of
the rules intended to restrict tho teams exclusively to bona flde students,
and It Is confident that tho activities of this Council will mako It impossible
for tho University to bo open to criticism on this score hereafter.
Included in the plans Is also a cnnvnss of tho high schools of tho State
for the purpose of Interesting 'In tho University young men of athletic
prowess, not merely to become athletes, but most of all, to become students
of tho University.
Altogether, the Council is authorized to do all In its
power to promote the general welfare and good standing of tho athletic
activities of the University, nnd thus to bring this phase of tho work to
the place of dlstinctior which it deserves to hold.

BETTER SPORTS.

It Is with extreme gratification that the Kernel calls tho attention of
its readers to the announcement which appears on another page of this
issue of the paper, concerning the complete reorganization of the Athletic
Council of the University. There can be no doubt that students, faculty
members, and everyone interested in the welfare of the University will regard this as a step in advance toward a wider field of recognition in athletics than that which the University has hitherto enjoyed, and which the
Kernel believes it will henceforth enjoy under this scheme.
The plan of reorganization adopted had its origin in the disastrous result of the games which the Wildcats played this year on the football field,
and was also accentuated by adverse criticism of various alumni and citizens of Lexington, who, loyal to the University and recognizing in the
football team a valued medium of advertising, felt that the University
was not getting her full due when her strong football eleven came off of
the field defeated Instead of victorious. University officials, endeavoring
to ascertain the cause of these defeats, and realizing that the probability
were
of repetition mlghtibo eliminated If a greater degree of
brought about on the part of all concerned, appointed a committee composed of tho Director of Athletics, one member of the faculty, and a former student who was at one time a star Wildcat, and instructed it to consider the situation from all angles, and work out a plan for improvement.
The report of this committee was brought before the senate at it's last

FOOD
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