xt70zp3vtd7z https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt70zp3vtd7z/data/mets.xml Lexington, Ky (Fayette County) University of Kentucky 1906 The University of Kentucky catalogs contains bound volumes dating from 1865 through 2007. After 2007 course catalogs ceased to be printed and became available online only. course catalogs  English University of Kentucky Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. University of Kentucky course catalogs, 1865- Catalogue of the Officers, Studies, and Students of the State College of Kentucky, Lexington, Volume 5 (Session ending 1906 June 7) text Catalogue of the Officers, Studies, and Students of the State College of Kentucky, Lexington, Volume 5 (Session ending 1906 June 7) 1906 2012 true xt70zp3vtd7z section xt70zp3vtd7z » CATALOGUE T T in    `
— OFFICERS, STUDTES, AND STUDENTS  
mm ‘ i 
STATE COLLEGE OE KENTUCKY, A
A wma A PART OF THE REGULATIONS.
SESSION ENDING JUNE 7, 1906. I
` P RHSS   YRNH S, A
A *°°°·

 PATTERSON HALL.
This Hall, a home for the you11g women of the College, is a large and *]
handsome three—story brick structure of a hundred and fifty feet front, built ’ l
on a fine site of about three acres fronting two hundred and ten feet on South
Limestone Street and a line of the City electric railway. Within a quarter
of a mile of the College on the south, a half mile of the Court House, the _
Phoenix Hotel and the Post-oiiice on the north, and distant not more than
ten minutes by rail-way from the principal churches of the City, Patterson
Hall is, for all purposes, admirably located. The building is heated by steam,
lighted by electricity, and supplied with hydrant and cistern water. lt has
a front veranda of l4 by GS feet, wide halls, a closet in every bed room,
and thirteen bath rooms. \Vith walks, drives and numerous old forest trees, C
the spacious front lawn, one of the most beautiful in Lexington, is an invit-
ing place for exercise, for which ample provision has also been made inthe
rear lawn, with tennis court and croquet grounds, as well as in the large
gymnasium
SiXty—eight commodious and well-furnished rooms afford accormuo . .,..,,. . ...,.... . ..... 9
ees, THE Knnrucnv Exvnnrrrnxr S·rA·r1oN.. .V..... . .,.,,.........   ........,,.. 12
vip Board of Control . . ...,.... . ..., . ...v. . ...,r..,...,............. . . .... 12
the Ofncers . .............. .. ......... . .4..l.. . ....._. .   .......   .. ...   12
U. S. Xvmrnaza BUREAU ........ . ..... . ............., . .l.....,......,,........   .......,. 13
nge ADMISSION . . .,,..v....,... . .....,..,.,.. . ...r.., . .,.. . ...........,,.. . .4..,..... 13
Dnpanrinianrs AND ScHooLs.. .. .......,,.........,.... . l.._,..,.»..........,.....r 16
ada- Conxses OF STUDY .. ......................., . ..................,...,.r.. . ..,.._.   17
and History, Political Economy, and Metaphysics   .....l... . ....,..   .. 17
53 8 Botany, Horticulture, and Agriculture ..,....................... . ,.._.,, . 17
_ The English Language and Literature. ...................,. . l...........,.l, 24
mg* Military Science . .. .. ........... .. .............,,..... . ..... .   .......... 26
Chemistry ........... .... ..............,.................. . ........ . .r......... . .... 27
tire. Mathematics and Astronomy .....   ..... . ...... . ,......... . ..... . .... . .... 30
Img Modern Languages .....»,. . ............,...... . ........... . ..........l4,. ..   31 I
WIL Greek and Latin ..... . ...............   ..,.........,,. . ....... . ........... .. 32 .
'l`he Academy ...r.... . ...r.............. . ......   .{...... . ,...... . ...,......... 35
Pedagogy .....r . ....... . .......................................................l.. . .... 35
vibe Civil Engineering ..........,...................   .........   .............. .. 38
Mechanical and Electrical Engineering ........................r............. 40 l
mb Anatomy and Physiology, .....,.........,,......r...`.............. . .........   45
lap Geology and Zoology ............... . .......   . ................................ 48
Physics ......................... , ..,..................   .... . ............r............. . 52
xm" I Entomology ..... . ................,........................ . .... . ....,.............. 54
Nile l Mining Engineering ..................... . .... . ................................. .. 54
ie of DEGREES ............,.............,.......................... . .................................. 60
Comzsns GROUPED Fon Drsonnas ..................................................,... 61 L
’ For the Degree of B. S. ...... , ........ . ........... . ....   .... . .................. 61
For the Degree of A. B,. ........................................................... 69
For the Degree of B. Ped ......... . ...... . ................. .. . ................... 72
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 ‘ iv STATE COLLEGE OF KENTUCKY.
Conxsas GROUPED FOR DEcR1ms—Couti¤ued. I
For the Degree of B. M. E ......................   .................... . ,...... 74  `
For the Degree of B. C. E ......   ....... . ..... . ........................, , ,,___ 76 ’ ’
For the Degree of B. Agr ..... . ...... . ...............   ........ . ............., 73
For the Degree of B. E. M ............ . ............ ., ...... . ....,.......... 81 A
THE NORMAL Scuoor. ...... . ........,`...   .... . .......,...... . .... . ....,..,.... . 83 ;
Scnoor. or PHYSICAL CULTURE ................................,..r.. .. .......,...... 87
Scuoor. on DOMESTIC Scmncs ............,... . . ............,.......... . ........... B9 .
THE AcADEMv .r....... . . .........   . .. ........ . .............. .. .........,...... 90  
Courses of Study ....... . ..... . . ........... . ........................,..   .. .. 91 3
ASSOCIATIONS 4......... . ..... .. . .................................................... .. 95 _ 
Literary Societies., ..... . .................   .. ......,.. . ....A . .......... 95
Engineering Society ............ . ...... . .....................,.......   . 4...... 95 V
Athletics ..... . .........,.............._. . ....... . .......... . ................ . 95
ALUMNI ............ . .......   .. ............,......   ..... . ................ ,. ......... 96 i
MILITARY DEPARTMENT, ROSTER ..... . .rr...... . ........u. . ........   .. .. ..... 109 .
POST-GRADUATES . ........... .. ..... . ....... . ........................ . ..... . . ...... 110  A
UNDERGRADUATES ........ . ..4...................... . ..... . .......... . ..,... .. .... ...110 ’
SUMMARY ........... 1 .............. . ............... . ..............................   ...123 ~
REGULATIONS. ............,.. .. .... . ....... . . .............. .. .     ........... 129
Public Exercises .... .. .. .. ......... . ,.... . .......... . .. ........ ...129 _
Traveling Expenses of Students . . ..........,.. . ......... . . .... 129  
College Expenses ........................................... . .......   .... . ...... 130 ·
Diploma ............ . ..................... . ....................,........ . ............. 130
Free Tuition, Beneficiaries .. .... . .....r.............. . ,...................   131
Appointments to the Normal Course ........................... . .............. 132
Special Courses of Study ......... . ............................................... 132 `
Change of Classication ...... . ,..... . .. ...... . ..................... . ...,.. . 132
Accredited Schools ....... . .......................   .......... . .,..... . .. . 132
Manual Labor,. ..... . ....... , ............. . .................   ,...... .. . 134
Certificates of Character ............................ . .,................ . . .... ..135 `
The Monitress ............... . .... . ................................ . ...... . ....... .135  l
Enlistment of Cadets ........ . .......................... . .... . ......   ........ 135 V
Rules of Classification .............. . ........................... . ............. . .... 135
CALENDAR ................. . ................... . ............. . ..... . .... . .... . ..... . ....... 135 _
Tun: SUMMER Scnoors .......................................... . ...,...................,. 136
COLLEGE DIRECTORY ..................................,...... .. ....................... ...139
· Ar>1=EN1>1x.. .... . ........................ . ...........   . ...... . .............................. 140 p
_ P
._ A . Ffa-ag  

 .. 74 ' 1
`   THE STATE COLLEGE OF KENTUCKY.  
. si “   
.. as ;  
L_   HISTORY.  
‘ 90 ··  GRICULTURAL and Mechanical Colleges in the United States owe  
‘ 91 j A their origin to an act of Congress entitled ‘Au Act Donating Public I
" 95 i Lands to the several States and Territories which may provide Colleges for `
" 95  ` the benefit of Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts," approved july 2, 1862. i_
" 95 3  The amount of land donated was 30,000 acres for each representative in the 'K
' 95 1 National Congress. Under this allotment Kentucky received 330,000 acres. ,
.. 96 Several years elapsed before the Commonwealth established an Agricultural  
..109 and Mechanical College under this act. \\/hen established it was not placed
..110   upon an independent basis, but was made one of the Colleges of Kentucky
..110 . University, to which institution the annual interest of the proceeds of the
..128 _ Congressional land grant was to be given for the purpose of carrying on its
.,129 1 operations. The land-scrip had meanwhile been sold for fifty cents per acre,
..129 ‘_  and the amount received-$165,000——invested in six per cent. Kentucky State
..129 Q bonds, of which the State become custodian in trust for the College.
..130 The connection with Kentucky University continued till 1878, when the
..130 , act of 1865, making it one of the Colleges of said University, was repealed;
. 131 and a commission was appointed to recommend to the Legislature of 1879-
..132 A 80 aplan of organization for an institution, including an Agricultural and
. 132 A Mechanical College, such as the necessities of the Commonwealth required,
..132) V The city of Lexington offered to the Commission (which was also author- .
   _ ized to recommend to the General Assembly the place which, all things
‘ B5 p considered, offered the best and greatest inducements for the future and
  _ » permanent location of the College.) the City Park, containing fifty-two acres ' i,
  1, of land within the limits of the city, and thirty thousand dollars of city bonds
"'mg   for the erection of buildings. This offer the county of Fayette supplemented .
'‘'' 135 , by twenty thousand dollars in county bonds, to be used either for the erect-
"`136 ,, ion of buildings or for the purchase of land. The offers of the city of Lex- ` ’
"'139   mgton andthe county of Fayette were accepted by the General Assembly,
"'M0 T By the act of incorporation and the amendments thereto, constituting
   p the charter of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Kentucky, liberal
·]  provision is made for educating, free of tuition, the energetic young men of
ig the Commonwealth whose means are limited. The Normal Department, for
_  ° ‘ which provision is also made, is intended to aid in building up the Common
‘   School system by furnishing properly qualified teachers. This College, with ,
f  the additional departments which shall, from time to time, be opened as the
V means placed at the disposal of the Trustees allow, will, it is hoped, in the A
_` not distant future do a great work in advancing the educational interest of
. .-..       . i'

 ` STATE COLLEGE OF KENTUCKY. ·
Kentucky. Being entirely undenominatioual in its character, it will appeal  
with confidence to the people of all creeds and of no creed, and will endeavor,  ,
in strict conformity with the requirements of its organic law, to afford equal  
advantages to all, exclusive advantages to none. The liberality of the Com- Z
monwealth in supplementing the inadequate annual income arising from the · .
proceeds of the land-scrip invested in State bonds, has enabled the Trustees
to begin and carry on, upon a scale commensurate with the wants of our
people, the operations of the institution whose management and oversight
have been committed to them by the General Assembly of Kentucky.  
SCOPE OF STUDIES.  ·
In the act of Congress making provision for the class of colleges to ·`
which the State College partly belongs, it is declared "that their leading  
object shall be, without excluding other scientific and classical studies, and
including military tactics, to teach such branches of learning as are related  Z
to agriculture and the mechanic arts, in order to promote the liberal and l
practical education of the industrial classes in the several pursuits and pro-  
fessions of 1ife." To the three departments of agriculture, the mechanic
arts, and military science, contemplated in the act as indispensable, a Nor-
mal School has bee11 added by the State and an Experimental Station by the
United States, while liberal provision has been made for instruction in all _
branches of science and in the classics, so that this institution is far more
than an agricultural and mechanical college, embracing, as it does, not `
merely the three original departments, but eighteen others.  ,
THE NORMAL SCHOOL. ·
The Normal Department of the State College exists under the authority
of acts of the General Assembly approved April 23, and April 29, l880,
Section 7 of the first act briefly defines the object for which the Department
was established, "a Normal Department or course of instruction for irregular
periods, designed more particularly, but not exclusively, to qualify teachers
for common and other schools, shall be established in connection with the
College." The second act provides the necessary endowment to make the  
Department effective.
Ten years ago, in order to prepare young men and women for doing the
highest work i11 their chosen profession, the Department of Pedagogy was
established, with a four years’ collegiate course, offering Pedagogy as a major
study. The attendance upon this course has steadily increased, and the
. work done has been of a high order.
THE KENTUCKY EXPERIMENT STATION. ,
The Agricultural Experiment Station of the State College of Kentucky  
was established by the Executive Committee of the Board of Trustees lll I  ._
September 1885, when the Department was organized and a Director .
appointed. In 1886 the Station was recognized and named by the General  
Assembly, and in 1887 it became the beneficiary of the first annual appro-

 · STATE COLLEGE OF KENTUCKY. 3 _
ral ’ priation of $15,000 under the Hatch act providing for the establishment of , gr
>¥. g Agricultural Experiment Stations in the several States and Territories,   ,
ral · The work of the Station is directed to two objects: 1. To a constant =
11-  C Succession of experiments made by specialists, in order to learn what appli-  
he 5 , cations of science will insure the best returns from the farm, the garden, the Z `
ees , orchard, the vineyard, the stockyard, and the dairy. 2. To the publication  
nr of bulletins announcing such results of the experiments as are found to be  
ht valuable to those of the people of Kentucky who seek pront from any one of Z`
r _  those prime sources of wealth-the soil, the iiock, and the herd,  
  Results of experiments have been published in seventeen annual reports ‘
 i and one hundred and twenty-six bulletins, and general appreciation of their ~
to li utility is shown in the fact that, while no bulletin is sent except upon appli- _
ng { cation for it, the mailing list of the Station contains about 10,000 names, and i—
ud  i is ever increasing. '
ed  J with an ample endowment, a large and cornmodious building planned  
ud  — for the purpose, adequate apparatus, a good experimental farm conveniently
'°·   situated, and a staff of fifteen scientists engaged in seven divisions of
lic   rcsearcli and in correspondence with other stations, the Kentucky Experi-
)r' I1l€lll Station is not only an important adjunct to the College in the educa-
he   tion of students for the leading industrial pursuits, but, directly or indirectly,
all _ through the wide and continual diffusion of knowledge for the benefit of so
'Ye   large a proportion of our population, it is bound to be extremely useful to
ot the Commonwealth at large. ,
‘ LO CATIO N .
 _ The State College of Kentucky is established in the Old City Park, just
‘ within the southern boundary of Lexington and near the Cincinnati South-
iy   ern Railway. 'I`he site is elevated and commands a good view of much of
°0‘ the city and of the surrounding country
nt _ Lexington, now a growing city of thirty-odd thousand inhabitants, is in
ar · the heart of the far-famed Bluegrass region, a region distinguished for fertil-
   V ity and licalthfnlness, wealth and beauty. Numerous schools and churches, ll
he  I an intelligent and refined population, well paved streets, handsome build-
ings, extensive water works, and an unsurpassed system of street electric p
hp _ railways make Lexington attractive as a seat of learning and place of resi-
‘ g dence, while the splendid stock farms scattered over the large body of fertile _ y
vas °~ Country around it afford advantages hardly equaled elsewhere for the student
E;  V, who desires to become familiar with the best breeds of horses, cattle, sheep,
· and swine in America. Moreover, with railroads diverging in seven direct-
  ions, Lexington is the railroad center of Kentucky, and in direct connection
 ~ with Louisville, Cincinnati, Maysville, Huntington, and Chattanooga, and
ky i.  Willi lllOI'€.ll18l1 seventy counties of the Commonwealth. And when to the
in .   €l€€l1'1C railways now in operation to Georgetown, Paris, and Vcl‘S3.ill€S,
Or `  ‘- those projected to Winchester, Richmond, and Nicholasville shall be added, ‘
,8,   the hourly trains of these six roads will enable students residing near them
_0_ k  ;·(;v;§€¤€l the College conveniently from their homes as far as twenty miles
h
-.   · ···· +· ~·~·

 V 4 STATE COLLEGE OF KENTUCKY.
onou N os.  t
The campus of the College consists of fifty-two acres of land, located  
within the corporate limits of Lexington. The South Limestone electric  .
car line extends along the western border of the campus, affording oppor- E
tunity to reach in a few minutes any part of the city. The campus is laid » ‘i 
out in walks, drives, and lawns, a11d is planted with a choice variety of
native and exotic trees a11d shrubs, to which additions are constantly being
made. A portion of the land has recently been reserved for a botanical gar- I
den, in which will be grown the most desirable native plants, with a view to 0
testing their adaptability to cultivation and to giving increased facilities to  
students taking agricultural and biological courses. Two and a half acres, .i
forming the northeast portion of the campus, inclosed and provided with a
grand stand, are devoted to the field sports of the students. L
About three-quarters of a mile south of the campus, on the Nicholas- 0
ville pike, an extension of South Limestone street, is the Experiment Station _
Farm, consisting of about two hundred and three acres. Here the field
experiments of the Station are conducted, and students have opportunities  `
to witness tests of varieties of field crops, dairy tests, fertilizer tests, fruit-  
spraying tests; i11 short, all the scientific experimentation of a thoroughly
equipped and organized Station. The front of the farm is pasture a11d ,
orchard. The back portion is divided off into two hundred one-te11th acre
plots, for convenience in making crop tests.  —
BUILDINGS. 0
The lllzzin B1¢ildz`¢1g.—Tl1is is a structure of stone and brick, 140 feet l
long and 68 feet in width. It contains the ofiice of the President a11d of the .
Business Agent, a11d on the third fioor, counting the basement fioor as one, ‘ 
is the chapel, in which each day tl1e students and the Faculty meet for
worship, Hllfl in which are held public gatherings and such other meetings ·
as bring together tl1e entire student body. The remaining space in this _
building is occupied by recitation rooms.
The O/rl .Slrzlz'0n B1¢ild1'¢1g.——Tl1is handsome structure is well planned
for the object for which it was built. It is seventy feet in length and hfty-
four feet in width, with a tower projection i11 front, Etlld an octagonal projec-
tion eighteen by eigl1tee11 011 the north side. The building is two stories
high, upo11 a basement eleven feet from floor to ceiling. The main entrance
is on the first floor, on the west side of the building, through an archway
fifteen feet wide.
. This building is henceforth to be devoted exclusively to the Depart- `
ment of Chemistry.
Zilechmzfral Hall.—This building covers altogether an area of about
20,000 square feet, is constructed of stone and pressed brick, Hlltl is well lA
furnished with n1acl1inery and appliances for work in Mechanical Engineering {  '{·_
T/ze D0rmz`l0rz`cs.-—The two large dormitories on the campus afford $·
lodgings for the students who wish to lessen expense in this direction.
Other buildings on the campus are a brick dwelling for the President and a ,_
cottage occupied by the Commandant.
I _   : .¢-

 STATE COLLEGE OF KENTUCKY. 5 ».
 0 Science Hall —-This hall, built during the year 1897 for the departments   T
1 1 Of Natural Science, is 96 x 97 feet, of pressed brick, trimmed with Bowling ·‘ { 
B — Green stone, The wide halls, the numerous and spacious lecture rooms, ‘
- { laboratories and oihces in its three stories are conveniently arranged, well ;  —
i  `. lighted, and the rooms are well furnished, Q 
, The Farm BILi]di7lg'5.—O11 the farm is a brick dwelling occupied by the  
i Director of the Station, and the usual buildings for the care of tools. the ; 
; ·' _ protection of stock, and the like,  
,   The Gymmzsium-—This imposing structure of pressed brick and Bed- ‘
,   ford stone, 100 x 157 feet, with the central part three stories high, the right _
t  f wing one and the left two, stands 150 feet north of the Main Building
 T and cost $30,000.  
.  _ The first iioor of the central portion contains the Armory, lockers for Q
t women, and the oiiices of the Commandant and the Physical Director. The ` · 
_ 1 second floor is occupied by Alumni Hall, the Trustees’ room, and a society A
; hall. The third door is divided into two society halls and a hall for the
. Y. M. C. A. All these rooms are commodious and finely adapted to their
» V purpose. The right wing, which is -1% x 95 feet, is used as a drill-room
_ during bad weather. The basement of the left wing is set apart for baths,
t lockers for men, wash-stands, closets, and a swimming pool The second
floor, the gymnasium proper, is equipped with the best apparatus that could
be procured.
The building is finished in yellow pi11e, heated by steam, and lighted
` , by electricity.
The New Siaiian B1¢ildz'1zg.—This house, on South Limestone, and a
* fourth of a mile from the campus, was completed in the winter of 1904.
The building is of two stories and the basement, of pressed brick with
· oolitic limestone-trimmings. The foundation is of Kentucky gray lime-
_ stone, faced with broken ashlar oolitic limestone, the balustrade of terra-
 _ cotta. A large portico, with columns extending from the first iloor line to ,
Q the pediment on a level with the cornice, forms an attractive feature of the V
V building. The cornice is massive, with large brackets.
` The general design of the building, which is 114 feet long x 60 deep, is
  colonial, adhering as strictly as possible to classic proportions and combina-
tions. i
  H1!/erson Ha//.—This large and handsome three-story structure, a home
for the young \VO111€11 of the College, is now ready for occupancy. Pleas-
` antly located on South Limestone street, a fourth of a mile north of the
{ College, and on the street railway which lies along the western border of the
  spacious grounds; built durably of brick, stone, iron and wood, and made
*  J} practically fire-proof; with long and wide porches and with a large closet in
F every room; with adequate provision for light, heat, ventilation and exer- *
p cise, this Hall offers to 122 occupants, two in a room, everything needed for
t` their health, safety, convenie11ce, comfort and physical culture.
Cost of ground, building and equipment, $60,000. _
._   . .,._. ..  . ... f'

 - 6 STATE COLLEGE OF KENTUCKY. _
DEVELOPMENT.  i
The growth of the College from year to year is shown as follows; T
1862. To establish and endow a college, chiefly for instruction in agriculture and the V-
mechanic arts, an act of Congress apportioned to each State, for each of its Senators and V
Representatives in Congress, 30.000 acres of the public land. ' l
1865. The General Assembly of Kentucky having accepted the State’s portion under A
the conditions prescribed, established the Agricultural and Mechanical College, making it
one of the colleges of Kentucky University, then recently united with Transylvania Uni.
versity and located at Lexington, citizens of Lexington and its vicinity donating $110,000 to V _ 
the Curators of the University to buy a site for the College. The General Assembly lining  g
authorized the Commissioners of the Sinking Fund to sell the 330,000 acres apportioned to  f
Kentucky, by the mismanagement of the Commissioners agent the State realized for its '
land only 5165,000.   V
1866. The College opened with a President, four Professors, and a Commandant. I
1878. Dissatisfied with the management of the College by the Curators, who wm  -5
engaged in a long factional strife, the General Assembly severed the connection with the .
University, and appointed a commission to re-locate the College, to provide for its continu-
» ance in Operation till re-located, and to prepare "a plan for a First·class University." Ken.
tucky University claiming and retaining the former site of the College, the sole property of l
the latter after the severance was an income of $9,900 derived from the land grant.
1880. The City of Lexington otfering the City Park of tifty—two acres as a new site for
the College, and also $30,soo in bonds, and the County of Fayette offering $20,000 besides, »
the General Assembly ratified the selection of the site made by a majority ofthe commis~ C
sion, and located the College permanently in Lexington. —
ISRO. To privide teachers for the Common Schools of the State and for other schools
the General Assembly added to the College a Normal Department, which should admit,  
besides other students, one from each representative district every year free of tuition.  `
_ 1880. Further to endow the College and to enable it to purchase apparatus, machinery,
implements, and a library; to maintain the Normal Department, and to defray other neces-
sary expenses, the General Assembly imposed a tax of one-half cent on each hundred dol-
lars ot the assessed value of all property in the State liable to taxation for State revenue
and belonging to its white inhabitants.
1880. The Classical and Normal Departments, and the Academy added.
1882- The College Building, the First Dormitory, and the President’s house completed.  .
1885. The Commandant‘s House reconstructed.
1887. To enlarge by experiments and to ditfuse the knowledge of agriculture, an act
of Congress established, under the direction of the Agricultural and Mechanical College in
each State, an Agricultural Experiment Station, appropriating for its support $15,000 per
annum.
1887. The Department of Civil Engineering established, an experimental farm of
forty-eight acres purchased, and the College greenhouse built.
1889. The Experiment Station Building completed.
1890. The Second Dormitory completed.
1890. For "the more complete endowment" of Agricultural and l\lechanical Colleges,
an act of Congress appropriated to each State 515,000 for the year ending june 30, 1890, and
the same sum with an increase of i1.0o0 per annum for ten years, after which the inaximum
` of $25,000 should continue without change. Of the amount thus annually appropriated, the g
College receives 85 per cent. and the school of the colored people at Frankfort I5 per cent. 2
1891. The Department of Mechanical Engineering established. ij
1891. The Department of Anatomy and Physiology established.  
1892. The Mechanical Building and Workshops completed. ` l
1894. Greenhouses for the Experiment Station built. I ‘_
189.;. The Department of Physics established. V
1895. The Annex to the Mechanical Building and the lnsectarium for the Station built. _
1897. The Department of Electrical Engineering established. Additions made to the  
Greenhouses and lnsectarium.
v` _ .j;'§¤§= ;.   .

 I ’ STATE COLLEGE OF KENTUCKY. 7 ..
` 1898. The building for Natural Science completed. , ji
» 1898. Sixty·four and a half acres added to the Experimental Farm, making 113 in all.   s
t 1000. Sixty thousand dollars appropriated by the General Assembly for a Collegiate  
he ~ » Home for Young Women, for a Gymnasium and Drill Room, and a Hall for the Y. M. C. A,
nd Q Igor, Ninety acres added to the Experimental Farm, making 203 in all. The Gymna- Z
l I sium, the Drill Room, the Halls for the Societies and the Y. M. C. A. completed. ; 
er 1901. The Department of Mining Engineering added.  
it 1902. The School of Physical Culture added.  
ii- long, Thirty thousand dollars additional appropriated bythe General Assembly for ;.
to , . the Young Women’s College Home, making $60,000 in all. gl
ig  S 1904, Patterson Hall, the Young Women's College Home, completed. A
to  Y. igoi. Fifteen thousand dollars per annum appropriated by the General Assembly to I
fs  ~_ defray the expenses of the College. ,
I 1905, The New Experiment Station completed.
 i IQQ6, The School of Household Economy added. ,
·a  ’ Izzrrmxc af Pre/*erly.——The property of the College is estimated to be worth $800,000 ·]
IC ~ more than it was in ISRO. i
¤·  ~ Iaznznre af C0ur.rc.v.—Before ISSO the College offered a single course of study leading ~
“‘  ' to a degree; it now offers nine. I
Ji Increase af Tmchcz·r.—Before 1880 the College had six Professors; it now has seven-
teen Professors and thirty-six assistants.
>r } [iipmz.v¢ uf tSZ1¢lit?I[5.·—TI1€ number in 1898-99 was 480, the largest till then in the
$· · history of the College; in 1903-1904, it was 732; in 1905-1906 it is about 780.
5-  _. lumzase af Grruluaies.—No fact more distinctly marks the growth of the College than
r the increase in the number of its graduates. More students have been graduated durlng
I5 the last three years