xt70zp3vtt0g https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt70zp3vtt0g/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19581211  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, December 11, 1958 text The Kentucky Kernel, December 11, 1958 1958 2013 true xt70zp3vtt0g section xt70zp3vtt0g Columnist Landers Thrills Capacity Crowd
"We are living In an age when
"The stimulating part of my a "family way", had gained 40
One of her ways of detecting plain the popularity of her column
it Is fashionable to lie down and work Is the variety of oeople who pounds, wore maternity clothes, phony letters is that "people in for men. He said that he usually
write," she stated. The attractive and still no baby. He wondered i.' trouble don't bother to compose didn't write to advice columns, but
talk things ever."

This analysis of the present aspect of American life was made
yesterday ty the Internationally
known columnist, Ann Landers.
Miss Landers, who in everyday life
Is Mrs. Jules Lederer, spoke to an
overflowing crowd In Gulgnol.
Miss Landers said that she has
received a large variety of letters
in her work as "advice columnist".
One letter aked if "moldy peanut
butter sandwiches are the same as
penicillin".

writer said that she receives letters from the richest to the poorest,
the most ignorant to the most intelligent, and the young and old.
"Nothing Involving human beings would astonish me now. But
one letter I received from a Lexington bod did astonish me," she
amended.
The letter that was so startling
to Miss Landers was the one saying
that his wife, whom he had married because she said she was in

was possible

to have an
masterpieces letters are usually
pregnancy.
hastily written notes on the side of
Her replay was "It sounds like the letter, afterthoughts, spilled
expert salesmanship with no pro- and most of them have a tout h of
duct."
humility which must be real."
"I have developed a sixth sense
"I have learned that many who
on detecting phony letters", she write don't want advice but merely
stated. Many readers have asked someone to listen." she said. Miss
her If she can tell If a letter she Landers revealed that about 50 jcr
receives Is on the level. She ad- cent of the letters she receives are
many letters are from men.
mitted that
phony, but those are limited to a
She remembered a letter she relittle less than four per cent.
ceived from a man that helped ex
It

he leltvcd she was " hard-rxulrdame who knew the score ami
would Rle him the straight good".
Miss
lenders said that h
doesn't pretend "to know all th
answers, but I usually know someone who does." She makes longdistance calls to people In many
states to make sure of the answer!
she gives to the renders' problem,
and she sends some answers by
telegram if she feels they
am
really urgent.
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UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY

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Vol. L

This week's Kernel Sweetheart is Carolyn Hill, a pretty little belle
from Ft. Worth, Texas. Carolyn, a sophomore English major,
transferred here from Christian College.

Trustees Name
Three Directors
directors of
centers and
an assistant professor of nursing
were named by the UK Board of
Trustees Tuesday.
Named part-tim- e
directors in the
Division of Extended Programs
were John Barrows, Versailles, and
Edsel T. Godbey, Lexington, effective Dec. 1, and Louis Alderman Jr., Columbus, Ga., effective
Sept. 1. 1D59.,
Miss Bettye Jane Smith. Fairfield, Ala., received the nursing
appointment.
Barrows, a native of South Dakota, is a graduate of Yankton College, Yankton, S. D. He took graduate study at the University of
Iowa and received his M.A. degree
from UK. He is completing work
toward a doctorate degree in educational administration.
He has been research associate
in the Association for Progress in
Education Administration, a regional program for graduate schools
sponsored by the Kellogg foundation, since February, 1956.
Godbey is a graduate of Berea
College. He received his M.A. degree from UK, and is now completing work on a doctorate. He
was assistant director of a Human
Relations Seminar here in the
summer of 1958.
Alderman, a graduate of Georgia
State College and the University
of Georgia, is currently working
part-timoff-camp-

e

us

11, 19"S

No.

41

UK Asks Underpasses
At Euclid Crosswalks

4fc

Three
University

LEXINGTON, KY., THURSDAY, DEC.

toward a doctoral degree at Alabama Polytechnic Institute. He is
now the director of the University
of Georgia Center at Columbus.
Miss Smith, a specialist in public
health nursing, wil! become the
first teaching faculty member of
the College of Nursing. Her appointment will be effective Feb. 15.
A graduate of the Birmingham
Baptist Hospital School of Nursing, Miss Smith was awarded a
B.S. degree from Georgia Peabody
College for Teachers in 1954 and
a M.A. degree from Teachers College,
Columbia University, this
year.
.

The University of Kentucky
Board of Trustees wants two unto
derpasses on Euclid' Avenue
replace the crosswalks now in use.
UK approval of plans by the city
of Lexington to widen Euclid between Limestone and Rose streets
was made contingent Tuesday upon
the construction of the underpasses, compensation for loss of trees,
and seven other conditions usually met in normal construction
projects. Property on both sides of
the street in that section belongs to the University.
Euclid Avenue, already a hazard
to pedestrian traffic, will be widened this spring to 82 feet. The underpasses would serve to alleviate
the safety problem, long a subject
of controversy on the UK campus.
Plans for construction of the
underpasses were not included in
the scope of the original project,
according to Mayor Shelby C. Kin-kea- d.
He said he felt such a project might prove to be too expensive. The State Highway Department however, has the final approval on the Euclid construction.
The widening of Southfl Limestone Street, another in a series
of Lexington street changes benefitting UK's recently announced
expansion plans, is also scheduled
to begin next spring, according to
Heidenreich, Lexington's
J. M.
city traffic engineer.

The project, to be undertaken by
the Kentucky Department of Highways and the Federal Bureau of
Public Roads, calls for the expansion of Limestone (U. S. 27) to
four lanes from Prall Street to
Conn Terrace.
Other improvements resulting:
from this construction will be an
easement of the Rose Street V. S.
27 curve with expansion of Rose
Street up some 2,300 yards from
the intersection. Both are intended to expidite traffic flow on and

off the major highway.
"Rose Street at the present timft
offers a particularly bad traffic
situation", Heidenreich said. "smcfl
it narrows from about 40 feet at
Washington Avenue to about 27
feet near the Rose Limestone intersection."
This makes it Impossible for
triple-lan- e
traffic flow simlalr to
that of the existing South Limestone Street arrangement.
--

Continued On rage

8

Loar's Speech-Wi- ns
Patterson Contest
First place in the fraternity
speech contest sponsored by the
Patterson Literary Society was
won Tuesday night by Dale Lour,
representing Phi Gamma Delta.
The contest was open to all
fraternities. Contestants gave extemporaneous
speeches lasting
ffrom six to 10 minutes.
tfcar's speech was on the role
of Asia in the modern world. It
centered around a verse from Morris Beer's "Manhatten".
He said Asia will be a determining factor in the future and that
the free world must assist Asia in

its rise to power. To win the world.
Russia must have Asia, he said,
and the free world must take active steps to prevent this.
Larry Ilclsingcr, Ihi Delta Theta.
won second place with his speech
on racial integration and restrictive clauses in fraternity charters.
,
"A voluntary society has th
same right to determine its members as a family has to determine
who comes Into its circle," Rebin-ge- r
.
said.
The trophies, first and second
place for the fraternities ".and firsfi
Continued On Fare 8

Drama Course Inspires
Idea For Hit Song
An idea for a song spawned in
a UK English class has grown into
a
hit for writer Fred
Burch, a senior here last year.
A song written by Burch, "Tragedy," is having more than moderate success in and about Lexington. The song concerns the
tragedy of lost love, and Burch
said he first got the idea while

Burch and Nelson have on wax now,
though they all have not been released yet. Due for release soon are
two entitled "In The Beginning"
and "Raining".
Burch and Nelson have written
songs since they
a total of 25
formed their team last summer.
All have been accepted by publishers, but only the eight are on rec-

discussing tragedy in English 116,
a contemporary drama class, here
last year.
Burch retained the original idea
until last summer, when he made
it into a complete song. The music
e
colwas done by Burth's
laborator now. Gerald Nelson. Both
are from Paducah, but now live in
Memphis, Tenn., where they are
seriously going about the business

ord,

full-sca-

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?

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f

"Tragedy" required a total of
eight hours to perfect. The words
came before the melody,
which
Nelson later supplied by strumming on his baritone
ukelele
until he was satisfied with the
music.
The vocalist
for the song is
Wayne, a high school
Thomas
senior in Memphis. Wayne has
been kinging about two years, but
of
Burch was a journalism major at this is his first successful recording.
The arrangement of the music for
UK for two years, from 1956-5after studying writing at the Uni- the song was handled by Scotty
versity of Hawaii, University of Moore, Elvis Presley's guitar acVi.sconjin,v
and University of companist.
Art earlier son? by Burch,
Mexico.
"Tragedy" is one of eight song
On Page 8

w'

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.

7

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full-tim-

song-writin- g.

1

W

8.

1
1

0 SHOPPING

DAYS

L TO CHRISTMAS

"Jun-Cwntinu- cd

Tragedy", a kong written by Fred Burch, left, a I K senior last
year, is having more than moderate success in the Lexington area.
Pictured with Burch i Geue Nelson, composer of the music to tho
ong.

* 2-- TIIE

views

L

11, 1958

KENTl'CKY KERNEL, Thursday, Dec.

and reviews

Develops Tester

Aero-La- b

by jim hmhon

The device relays information
relative to the efficiency of tho
shutter. This is accomplished
through the transference of light
passing through the shutter Into
voltage analogy by means of an

sidewalk artists, stylus; no barf
The issue Includes a generous
sprinkling of poetry, two short
stories and ft critical csay.
This issue contains the best
short story and the most original
poem that we've seen In Stylus.
The short story, written by Ourney
Norman, Is his fourth to be published by Stylus and by far his

Our sidewalk artists have be- come a serious problem for M&O.
Political aspirants with their paint
inpina antics last vear alone cost
the University more than $253.
unsightly paintings
Only the
removed with paint remover.
were
To free the entire campus sidewalks from paint would cost more
than a thousand dollars.
To those students who feel they
have a monumental accouncement
to make to the student body, we
strongly recommend that they use
whitewash.

oscilliscope.

Tti Seal Contest

....,

Fiji

"

For Any

Occasion
CALL
j

""

....

:i

J

4

.

i

:

'

:.

....

Now Open
Indoor Theateratorium!

r

Aeronautical
UK's Wenner-Gre- n
Laboratory has completed construction of a device which will be
used to test cameras used in aerial
photography.

BEN ALI "Monster on the Campus" - 12:00, 2:55, 5:50, 8:45.
"Blood of the Vampire" - 11:16,
4:11, 706, 10:01.

CIRCLE 25 "Cat on a Hot Tin
Roof" - 5:30. 10:35
"True. Story of Lynn Stuart" --

The device, called an Aero
Camera Shutter Tester, was developed by the lab for Wright
Air Development Center.
Trcfessor Fred C. Curtis, technical engineer of the project,
describes the device as one that
will save the government money by
permitting testing of expensive
camera shutters prior to their use
in aircraft. Professor Curtis says
the device is accurate to one 100th
,
of 1 per cent.
The tester consists of two
arate units. One unit tests shutters that open from the center outward while another tests the
"scanning" typo shutter used in
larger c4neras.
HIGH-STYL-

With

the

New

GODS"
Debbie Reynolds John Saxon
Curt Jurgens

"THIS HAPPY FEELING"
(See Movie Guide

Times)

TV ORIGINAL BY

IMAGE" PICTURE

:

anrf amazing BALANCED FIDELITY S0UND;
17 INCH

$194.95

Lightweight,
RCA Victor portables
easy-to-carr- y,

with
oil UHF and VHF channels.

Clear sharp

reception on
both local and distant channels.

rom

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craatEM-iHiu- T

SOLO ON EASY TERMS

385 SO. LIMESTONE

THIS WEEK'S BEST SELLERS!
"POPS"
"The Chipmunk Song"

l) starts Today!
Students Victims of Terror Beasts

The Chipmunks
Smoke Gets In Your Eyes"
The Platters

1

Lonely Teardrops"

Jackie Wilson

My Happiness"

Connie Francis
i. v

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ORDER NOW

V

Now Playing

CAPJiPUS
McVcy Hall

Palmer

Authur Kennedy
"TWILIGHT FOR THE

E

WILDCAT FINISH

Book Store

Betsy

All Color Entertainment!
Rock Hudson - Cyd Charisse

brings, you Urn GIVING

Li'

10:30)

Admission 65c

Open 5:30

"'

NEW

&

"TRUE STORY OF
LYNN STUART"

$159.95

WATCH FOR THIS SPACE NEXT WEEK
Your Name May Appear For A

TTgjT

6:30

2nd feature

TOP FIVE

CLASS RINGS

ROOF"
(Color

14 INCH

SEE THE . . .

SHOWING
at Reg. Price)
'Big Daddy' Ives
Newman .

"CAT ON A HOT TIN

Developed by the UK Wenner - Gren Aeronautical Laboratory
this Aero Camera Shutter Tester is designed to test the shutter
accuracy off Air Force cameras used in aerial photography.
By PALMER WELLS

2-i-

Indoor Theatre

NOW
(First Time
Liz Taylor Paul

te

emuoirs

Only

LEX's

Outdoor

9:05.
FAMILY "Twilight for the Gods"
6:30, 10:40.
"This Happy Feeling" - 9:00.
KENTUCKY "I Married a Woman" - 1:28, 4:20. 7:12. 10:04.
"Terror in a Texas Town" - 12:00,
2:52. 5:44, 8:36.
The winner of the Miss Christ-- j
STRAND "Last Hurrah" - 2:45.
mas Seal contest will be awarded
6:30, 10:20.
an engraved trophy by the Lex-- j
"She Played with Fire" - 1:00,
ington-FayetCounty TB Associa- -,
4:45, 8:35.
tion, sponsor of the contest.

-

Admission 65c

Open 5:20

-

.;

FREE' .MEAL

BALFOUR

.....

f

MOVIE GUIDE

Lucy Alexander, Kappa Kappa
Gamma, took over the lead in the
Miss Christmas Seal contest this
week as a large block of votes were
turned in for her. Nancv Foster,
Alpha XI Delta, is in second place,
followed closely by Ann Woodward
in third place.
The contest now enters the last
week and will end at midnight
Thursday, Dec. 18. Students who
have not voted in the contest may
do so by mailing their contribu-- I
tions to the Christmas Seal Cam-- !
paign.

FLOWERS

,.

I

Ends Next Week

charged for it.

417 East Maxwell

--

n.

FALL STYLUS
The fall issue of Stylus is on
sale' at the Campus Book Store
and it's well worth "the quarter

29

f

s

Through this the machine then
delivers a graphic photograph of
the shutter curve or the area of
light which the lens permits to
enter. Through this information,
defects in shutters, insufficient
speed in opening or inadequate
opening of shutters may be detected.
In describing the tester, Dr.
Curtis related that many photography companies have similar
testing devices but that they are
not as accurate, and for commercial reasons the details of their
make-u- p
are closely guarded.
The project was engineered at a
cost of $46,895.

i

-

,-

.

DIAL

w.

best.

The poem we refer to is "Song
to a City Cemetery," by Tom Mars-toThe poem is Marston's first
to be published in Stylus.
Also In the fall Issue is another
by
Hazel vignette
Sam and
a&s jons
Jackie Mundell. We aren't sure we
National magazines are saUated understand the story but it does
with articles describing the threat make delightful reading.
AN EXAM STORY
demand for students with liberal
arts degrees but evidently the big
We were drinking a cup of coffee
companies in the U. S. haven't with a friend recently and the conteen reading them.
versation turned to a professor we
Excluding governmental agencies, know who doesn't follow the fiendMich as the Navy and Border ish system of his cohorts.
Patrol, only five companies, plus
Seems our friend had just finishagencies, have ed two exams one day during the
a few insurance
been on campus so far this semes- spring finals and was ready to
ter to interview liberal arts sen-jor- s. take her third final for the day,
given by the aforementioned pro80 companies have fessor.
More than
been here so far looking for stu
Her mind exhausted t)V the two
a scientific or technical previous exams, she played a hunch
dents with
background.
that the exam paper wouldn't be
graded and instead of answering
ABC CRACKDOWN
Girls living in the dorms were the questions, she wrote a. few
warned last week bv their counsel stanzas of "The Star Spangled
questions
lors to confine their bacchanalias Banner" for the essay"good-bye"
and "hello", "think",
to bars and dance halls that have
and "don't read this" for the fill-In- s.
a food license.
Kentucky state law provides a
Needless to say, she got an "A"
$500 fine and six months in the
in the course. We'd list the name
calaboose for any male or female
under 21 caught in a bar or night of the professor but why ruin a
club that doesn't serve food other good thing?
than the liquid kind.

Michler Florist

Jr

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"

JL '

'

'

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Whole Lotta Loring"
Fats Domino
OPEN NITES 'TIL 9, MONDAY THRU FRIDAY

VXiTrTii ' I
2nd Feature
1

.

! All

feP'MHS-DAllL-

FAMOUS

FOR FAMOUS BRANDS

v

v

669

S. Broadway
2 BLOCKS WEST OF CAMPUS

* Till KfMIUV KIRMI

Alums Are Nomina led

on the SPOT

Lexington mm ;ind one
Somerset were selected
by
the LK alumni for consideration
to fill the post of alumnus mem
bers of the UK Hoard of Tiu.-tees- .
Thry are Robert H. Hill, nmeyor.
partner in a Lexington nursery
firm; T. II.
Hardwick. Fayettl
County
farmer and hotelmnn
and Richard E. Cooicr, manasjel
and part owner of a Somerset stoiu
company.
Six persons were nominated for
the position. Names of the three
Two

DAN MILLOTT
week's

Student Congress
flection may lack the luster of a
I residential election, but there will
certainly be some races that will
Reserve careful observation.
Elections can be quite unpredictable, but certain facts can give
lis some idea of the course of the
election and what will happen
afterwards.
Judging from past elections,
especially
elections, this one will experience far
less enthusiasm. In some Isolated
laces the campaigning will probably be hot and heavy, but In
cithers little interest may be gen
erated.
This will be the course of events
depending on the outcome. Oddly,
a Students' Party sweep might
l;elp the CP more than a standoff
r even a Campus Party sweep.
An SP landslide would mean a
c omplete rebuilding for
the spring
election by the Campusites. It
would probably place them in a
tetter position to capture the
whole prize by spring.
Certainly a drastic defeat would
put public sentiment behind the
C ampus Party
and the "one party
system" issue could be revived
apain. It certainly was an aid last
spring.
One thing appears certain; win
c r lose, the
Campus Party will
undergo some changes after the
iirst cf the year. Bob Chambliss
will definitely step down as party
non-president- ial

chairman.
In the last few weeks Chambliss

has become convinced that the
Campus Party needs "a full time
chairman."
What about a successor for
Chambliss? The Campus Party
has one. Barring unforeseen developments, Dan West will take
over'. as CP chairman in January.
When. this. takes place, watch for
a pickup in Campus Party activity.
The presidential sweepstakes will
be enough to bring this about.
Another factor may contribute to
this increase in enthusiasm. Prospects for victory in May will look
brighter than for any
Party ticket since 1956.
What will happen to the Students' Party? If the party wins or
loses the problem will still be the
same
no outstanding candidate for president in 1959.
A victory of broad degree would
insure the party a substantial voice
in SC through 1959, but this can
only be insured by a complete
fweep. A victory would also increase the opportunity of finding
a strong presidential candidate in
non-Studen-

ts'

add to the uncertainty of the SP
future. Certainly a change in lead-

ership could be forthcrtminpr. And
-

with this some realignments could
take place, especially if a conservative-liberal
rift occurred during the choosing of a new chairman.
One thing is sure the Students'
Party's April 7 convention will be
one of the most uncertain meetings
in the party's history.
It is said there are some nice
The outcome next week will de- figures in
the math classes.
pend mostly on the work of the
individual candidates, but the reKeep Lexington green. Bring
sult will certainly effect the money.
psychological outlook of the two
parties.
Whatever the result, there'll be
some changes made.

A

LIVINGSTONE. Northern Rho- desia (AP) This little town has!
assigned a traffic cop to a post
close to Victoria Palls, neaiby
tourist attraction. His job is to,
prevent collisions between cars and
elephants.

5:?

aa

1VI

n

REPAIRS

U

L2

nciercpnit-fidi- i

Trw-'ervcrrrfarv
Peterson to the l.uul.
which certified them and autho
rized them transmitted to
the
vrrnnr.
vJ,lV
Chandler will appomt or.e
of the members to a four-yea- r
term, effective Jan. 1. to .succeed
Louis Cox. rYankfort, uho.se trrm
expires Dec. 31.

PARTS AND

s

D.

StRVICt FOR

ANY MAKI RADIO AND TV

While You Malt

Service

faatntat

FasilitUt

Dri.a.la

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(Jits'

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SERVICE CENTER
417

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M.ll

fkoM 4 0064

KIMBALL HOUSE COFFEE SHOP
283 South Limt
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK. 6 A.M. TO 10 P.M.

Hash brown potatoes and biscuit Included with til breskfatti.
Sandwiches and Short Orders of all kinds.

Until 9 p. m.

King Kong was a firm advocate

of evolution.

Mi-Lad- y

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BEAUTY SALON

Aft

PERSONALIZED STYLING
PLEASE CALL

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FOR VER

NEC ESS IT Y
GrRvttb ENTRANCES

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OpenJil 9 p.m. Thursday and
Friday nights
SOUTHLAND SHOPPING
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Plenty of Free Parking

4

STARTS

TODAY"

Xmarried flfo
2nd Hit!

.
--

Sterling Hayden
"TERROR IN A
TEXAS TOWN"

Mot. until 5 p. m. 50c
Ere. after 5 p. m. 75c

"Hare

'I

H.uml of

you tried the
newest place in town
the one with the gay
--

90s atmosphere."

i

If

II
U

t?

orioma i

119 SO. LIME
Dyeoble White Sotin Pump
HigK or Mid Hi Heel
--

"Before the game after
anytime-c- ome
the game
in
and let us
you a southern
serve
style dinner. You'll be
glad you did.

Evening Bags $5.98 plus tax

Clips $2

BAYNHAM'S Shoes of Distinction - 133 - 35
OPEN 'TIL 1:00 A. M.

M-

RADIO

j

Students' Party defeat would

I

tl by

Frank

pr.-

.

Open Monday, Wednesday
Friday Nights

Traffic Problem

...

May.

lectrd by the alumni

m

Ih,.

AUTO ft HOMI

For Trustee Board

ft
I

With

Next

IImhmI.iv.

,

E.

Main

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* The Kentucky Kernel
Jtat4

Untvt.rsity of Kentucky

vt--- i

onH cU
Pout Of fir at Lfilnrtoo, Kentucky
mHrr nnrVr tti Act of Mrch 3, 1879.
Publiabrd four timet wrrk during the rrfular Mhonl year eicrpt bolidayi and eiama,
SIX DOLLARS A SCHOOL YEAR

t

Jim Hampton,

Editor-in-Chi-

ef

Larrt Van IIoose, CJilcf Sports Editor
Ann Roberts, Society Editor
IKMtT Ashley, Business Manager
Norman McMcllin, Advertising Manager
Cordon Baer, Staff Photographer
Hank Chapman, Cartoonitt
Marilyn Lyvm and Judy Fennebaker, Proofreaders
Antt Eitefson,

Chief Netcs Editor

THURSDAY'S NEWS STAFF
Jim Hudson, Editor

Nancy Meadows, Associate Editor

.Scoty Hixt, Sports Editor

SC's New Plan

A

Mutual-Ai- d

night SC President Pete
Perlman proposed an idea which
deserves utmost consideration by
Student Congress and the student
Monday

body.

The president proposed that

UK.

initiate action in the lormation ol a
Southeastern student government
conference.
The idea behind this proposal is
to pr oxide our region with an or-

ganization xvhere student governments could xvork together on mutual
problems.
Naturally the proposal is somewhat
related to the rejection of the National Students Association several
days ago, but we xvould hope that in
this case discussion on the question
will not be placed on similar lines to
the NSA debate.
SC Vice President. Fred Strache will
head the committee which will start
,

"Whin's The Use?"

Group
investigating this proposed regional
group. 1 1 is up to this committee to
learn,, the sentiments ol the other
Southeastern schools.
We hope that m their investigation the committee will find favorable
response in the South. Wc also hope
that some concrete proposals are
made in regard to the manner in
which the regional group will function.
We favor this proposal as we
favored the NSA question, because,
in the long run,' it should help UK
student government And ultimately
the University itself.

To The Editor:
Tin's may help formulate a better

sportsmanship during basketball season. f you can, I would appreciate
your publishing this.
. , Give 'em hell, .Wildcats."
Do we really mean this "cheer"?
Can the Wildcats actually give them
hell?
Basically, xvc derive our concept of
hell from the llible. There are three
Greek New Testament xvords xvhich
are interpreted as hell in English.
These are:
1. Hades xvorld of the dead, both
good and bad.
2. Tartarus
the underworld - of

darkness.
3. Gehenna xvhich

the valley
of Hennoiv "ear Jerusalem, into
which garbage xvas cast and burned.
Taking "hell" literally, xve should
not want to "give" anyone such a
state. There was a line sportsmanlike gesture by the UK cheerleaders
in football. 1 his xvas their
at half-timgiving hot dogs and cokes or coffee
to the opponents' cheerleaders. Is
"Give 'em hell" in keeping with such
a fine gesture?
The use of the xvord would seem to
indicate a limited knowledge of one's
own vocabulary, a poor vocabulary,
or low morals. The lirst is probably
more correct. The users of the xvords
are usually careless speakers or hx pontiles. They art hxpoc rites in that
they would not think about telling
anyone to "go to hell," unless under
game conditions.
Lastly, it is. a poor "cheer." A cheer
should be to pep up xour own team,
not degrade another. A loud chorus of
boos is no more degrading than this
"cheer."
is in

e

Boijby

Gfne "Ahch" Ward
(HeU of a note, isn't h?
THE
EDITOR).

-

College Students And Religion
P.y

GURNEV NORMAN

exist in this xvoild. Some students knoxv
3
about or haxe heard of lUiddhism, Mohammedanism, Shintoism. and of
the
philosophies of Kant and Darwin. They
seek the relationship between these ideas
and Christianity, and their logical teachersthe ministers usually fail them.
4. Religion is presented to college students as it was presented to them when
they xvere age 10. The Holy llible- - (for
xvhich I haxe ex cry respect), is still largely
corpresented as a factual, xvord
rect document to be taken liter all), xvhen
surely it must be admitted if )ou think at
all that this line book is replete xvith
sxmbolism and parables that must be
interpreted be lore they have religious
signif icanc e. .
UK.
Students aie also repelled by the pretty
The basic complaint these students
bickering and disagieements among the
have, I think, is that chinches are un1'JjH
denominations, the fusses over the xvay
realistic in their approach to our
sac laments aie obscixed, the minor points
xvith my'Western cultuic and to coping
riad social and moral pioblcms in an on interpretation that keep whole groups
at each other's thioaTs. This is particularage of cixilicd conluMon.
Perhaps the mo-- t significant of theso ly obvious in sin ,i Iter communities.
College stuck nts some of them aie
complaints is found in one ol the followtired of threats ol hell or hopes of paraing
1. A college student goes to church and
dise as a motixe for doing "good, rather
'
is met by a stxle show in which social presthan hearing a logical reason for behaving a certain xvay.
sure louts him to participate. Easter and
Now the validity of these comments is
new clothes haxe. come to be synonymous.
limited because they aiise
People chess for' (lunch as they would lor admittedly
a formal dance. Tn actuality this is
from the limited scope ol one individual's
a
minor point, but some students, seeking observation. I do not profess to be an
between dress and authoiity on dandies or religion, as lexv
to line! correlation
'
of us are. This is merely one person's
xvorship and finding none, hae a seed of
skepticism sown in their minds.
attempt to explain xhy churches haxe
lost their appeal lor some students.
2. There are moie serious objections.
Perhaps intelligently taught Sunday
For one thing, it is conducted exactly as
it xvas last Sunday. It is a loimality, a
school classes offer a possible solution.
routine meeting xvith the stiff order of
Of course there xvill be the inexitable
xvritten out and xvith rarely
the program
letters from some, declaiming me as an
any originality or freshness thrown in. atheist or agnostic, but I am neither.
Group praxcrs led by a preacher are a Neither have 1 attempted to discredit
time lor thinking about some distant Christianity, for Christianity is a philosothing (admit it, now), and, xvhen hxmns phy and the foregoing comments are
aie sung, a loud pipe organ and a group concerned only xvith the way people adof professional singers in the choir drown
minister that philosophy.
the- xoiccs in the audience. One xvho
out
Some students want in their religion a
would meditate seriously linds no opporforcefulness of thought a postive, philosotunity.
phical approach to morality instead of
3. There are still moie serious objecan emotional shying away from real obtions. Rarely do preachers ac know ledge stacles to sane living and unless they are
to thejr lollovving the possibility that,, gixen tin's in their churches, tlux will
other bt lit Is, clilfercnt from their own. seek it tlstxvheie.

(The lollowing comments arc concerned
only with Protestant churches.)
At a certain point in a student's philosophical maturity, he begins to question
what he has been taught since childhood,
and his
religious ' training does not
escape his scrutiny. He asks, "Have I been
told everything?" And xvhen he discovers
he hasn't he reacts, often adversely.
The exchange of ideas is an
This investigation xvill carry into an
quality that a Southeastern student government group could analysis of what present religious training
he is receiving as a college church-goer- .
bring about.
vVVheu he disc oxers that today he is still
This is something constructive. We .pi, -getting a broad-mindereligions connot
think it will work.
cept Ironi his church, then churches very
often lose their appeal for this particular
student. There arc many such people at
often-overlook-

ed

for-wor-

d

d

The Readers' Forum
Hell Is A Variable

Much Ado About

Death And Disability
To The Editor:
For each of the past 20 years or so,
traffic accidents in this country have
claimed 30,00 to 40,000. lives. This is
ti!igic in every sense of the xvord. But
is it more tragic than the hundreds of
l
thousands of
injuries inflicted annually on the highxvays and
streets?
1
read so often of the number of
fatalities, but seldom do I sec statistics
on injuries. Last year this number xvas
(1,100,000), I believe. Of course, this
includes the number of people xvho
suffered only sprained, wrists, cuts
bruises, etc., but it also inc ludes those
xho are now permanently disabled
because of amputation, loss of sight,
paralysis, or other serious injuries.
It would be difficult to say xvhich is
xvorse: outright death, or the living
death of disability that changes pronon-fata-

ductive individuals into lifetime consumers of hospital and medical care.
Statistics cannot shoxv the grief of
air orphan or. widow. They can only
measure the tragic waste of resources
and lives which xve have permitted to
become so commonplace. This could
all be avoided if xve drivers xvould constantly be aware that, xvith the least
bit ol carelessness or discourtesy xvhile
driving, our servants in business, and
pleasure can be transformed into killers or mutilators.
Pa 1. 1). Coorr.R

-

Faculty Club Correction

1

KERNELS
It is ridiculous to suppose that the

great head of things, xvhatexer it be,
paxs any regard to human alfairs.
Pliny Tin; Eldfr
It's no disgrace l' be poor, but it

might as well be.
"Aue Martin"

One of the Kernel's stall reporters
may haxe jnadxertently caused some
faculty members to miss their lunches
yesterdays

Alter our feature article on the
Faculty Club appeal eel, xve teceixed a
telephone call from Hill Downey, the
club's host. Mr. Doxvuey, ox c nun by
late lunchers who thought the club's
dining hours had been changed, asked
that we coned our trior. Lunch is

still serxed o