xt70zp3vv61n https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt70zp3vv61n/data/mets.xml Kentucky Kentucky Coal Association Kentucky Coal Council 2001 journals  English  This digital resource may be freely searched and displayed.  Permission must be received for subsequent distribution in print or electronically.  Physical rights are retained by the owning repository.  Copyright is retained in accordance with U. S. copyright laws.  For information about permissions to reproduce or publish, contact the Special Collections Research Center. Kentucky Coal Facts Kentucky Coal Facts: 2001-2002 Pocket Guide text Kentucky Coal Facts: 2001-2002 Pocket Guide 2001 2014 true xt70zp3vv61n section xt70zp3vv61n  *%,2001-2002 POCKET GUIDE
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T v is Jobs, Energy, Tax Revenue, and Economic Growth
x Prepared by the
Kentucky Coal Council
andthe
T Kentucky Coal Association
http2//wvvw.coaIeducation.0rg Edition  

 1
. Electricity
Average electricity costs in Kentucky were 4.1 cents/kilowatt—hour in 2001, the
lowest in the United States.
Production
Kentucky produced 131.8 million tons of coal in 2000, compared to the record
production of 179.4 million tons set in 1990. Kentucky has been one of the top three
coal producers inthe United States forthe last 50 years.
Employment ‘
The Kentucky coal industry paid $678.4 million in directwages in 2000, directly employing
14,812 persons and indirectly providing 3 additional jobs forevery mineremployed. The
average weekly wage for coal miners in Kentucky was $880 during 2000. _
Economy
The Kentucky coal industry brought over $2.5 billion into Kentucky from out-of-state
during Fiscal Year 2000-01 through coal sales to customers in 27 other states and 11
foreign countries. Kentucky coal companies paid $141 .2 million in coal severance
taxes in Fiscal Year 2001.
Coal Markets
Electric power plants, located in 27 states, accounted for almost 79% of the Kentucky
coal sold during 2000.
Approximately 80% of the coal produced in Kentucky is sold out—of-state each year.
There are 22 major coal-burning electric generating plants in Kentucky, and almost
all (97%) of Kentucky‘s electricity is generated from coal.
Environment
All surface—mined land today is reclaimed equal to or better than it was prior to
mining. Kentucky mining companies have received five national reclamation awards
in 1999 thru 2001 for outstanding achievement in surface mining and received atotal
of 27 awards in the past 16 years.
Coal mining creates valuable lands such as wildlife habitats, gently rolling
mountaintops, wetlands, and industrial sites where only steep, unproductive
hillsides had once existed.
Kentucky operators have paid over $783.97 million into the Federal Abandoned Nline
Land Fund since 1978 to reclaim abandoned coal mines. Nationwide, operators have
paid over $5.82 billion into this fund. However, $1.51 billion remains unallocated for
All/lLreclamation. H
Coal Resources _
Kentucky has two distinct coal fields, one in Western Kentucky and one ln Eastern I
Kentucky. Kentucky‘s 88.5 billion tons of coal resources remaining represent 84% of l-
the original resource.
Teacher Resources
Coal education resource materials are now available to teachers and students on the
Internet at the web site www.c0a/educationorg. Additionally, a coal education multi-
media library kit with interactive learning tools is now available in every public
elementary, middle school, and county library in Kentucky.
December 2001. This publication is for informational use only. lt includes some extra-
polative second and third party data as well as some broad estimates, and should not
necessarily be construed as official source data or be construed as advocating or reflect-
ing any policy position of the Kentucky Coal Council or the Kentucky Coal Association.
I [www.coaIeducati0n.org]

 Three centuries after it was discovered in America, coal is still providing powerforthe
nation. As we begin a new century, coal faces many challenges to its premier status,
but its importance can never be questioned. The fuel that enabled the United States
to become the wealthiest industrialized nation in the world is still responsible for over
half the nation's electrical power.
Coal provides 51.8% of the electricity in this country, and in Kentucky 97% of our
electricity comes from coal. (see page 47)
Y Average electricity costs in Kentucky were 4.1 cents per kilowatt-hour during 2001,
the lowest in the United States. Kentucky's electric rates were 12% belowthe regional
average and 23% below the national average in 2000. These low rates are largely
due to our reliance on coal-tired generation, sold at cost—based rates, as well as
_ sound utility management and excellent public policy.
Kentucky's share of the steam coal market to U.S. electric
;'fQ"5;'L‘;fg,°$, utilities ueciitteti from 23.5% oitiie marketin1975to11.7%in
g' 2000. (seepage 46)
As Kentucky coal companies consolidated into a globally competitive industry the
number of mines decreased. The number of mines currently in Kentucky is down to
almost one-fifth ofthe 2,063 mines which existed in 1984. (seepage 8)
The amount of sulfur dioxide emitted from burning coal in Kentucky has been reduced
by more than one—half since 1976. (seepage 28) .
Post—mining land use changes are providing long term economic, social, and
environmental benefits to Kentucky, and the benefits are increasing. (see pages 30
and 31 )
Kentucky ships over 2.6times as much coal to its neighboring
IS WBT? 3 Tmnd? states as it receives from them, but Kentucky's positive coal
flow ratio has been cut in half since 1990. (see page 26)
Natural gas costs to U.S. electric utilities in 1993, 1998, and again in 1999 increased
higherthan petroleum, while coal costs continued to decrease. (see page 43)
Underground mining in Kentucky continuesto show steady safety improvements. (see
page 72)
0ver $2.5 billion continues to be brought into Kentucky each yearfrom coal sales to
27 other states and 11 foreign countries. (see page 17)
The numberof successful mining reclamation bond releases in Kentucky continuesto
grow each year. (see page 29)
li
On the Horizon? """"" \ I
{ IIIIIHIIII   \ I
[FAQ}  
’ ` K 1
Kentucky permits two coal—fired power plants — wm
the first in 20 years. I it
Cover: The cover depicts a new coal-fired power plant on a reclaimed mountaintop
surface mine. New plants are now cleaner burning and can co—fire waste coal, waste
products, natural gas, orbiomass with the coal. Some have new clean coal technology
fuel cells.
Source: See individual reference pages as listed. . i  

 Governor’s Office Phone; 502/564-2611
700 Capitol Ave., State Capitol Building, Frankfort, KY 40601 Fax: 502/564-2517
Department of Local Government Phone; 502/573-2382
1024 Capital Center Drive, Ste. 340, Frankfort, KY 40601 -8204 Fax: 502/573-2939
or 502/573-2512
Department of Mines and Minerals Phone: 502/573-0140
P.O. Box 2244, 1025 Capital Ctr. Dr., Ste. 201, Frankfort, KY 40601 Fax: 502/573-0152
Kentucky Geological Survey Phone: 859/257-5500
228 Mining & Mineral Resources Bldg., Lexington, KY 40506-0107 Fax: 859/257-1147
Legislative Research Commission Phone: 502/564-81 oo ‘
700 Capitol Ave., Capitol Bldg., Rm. 300, Frankfort, KY 40601 Fax: 502/564-6543
Natural Resources and _
Environmental Protection Cabinet Phone: 502/564-3350 l
Capital Plaza Tower, 5th Floor, Frankfort, KY 40601 Fax: 502/564-3354
Department for Surface Mining Reclamation & Enforcement Phone: 502/564-6940
Commissioners Office Fax: 502/564-5698
Division of Field Services Phone: 502/564-2340
#2 Hudson Hollow, Frankfort, KY 40601 Fax: 502/564-5848
Division of Permits Phone: 502/564-2320
#2 Hudson Hollow, Frankfort, KY 40601 Fax: 502/564-6764
Division of Abandoned Lands Phone: 502/564-2141
2521 Lawrenceburg Road, Frankfort, KY 40601 Fax: 502/564-6544
Department for Environmental Protection Phone: 502/564-2150
Division of Waste Management Phone: 502/564-6716
Division of Water Phone: 502/564-3410
14 Reilly Rd., Ash Bldg., Frankfort, KY 40601 Fax: 502/564-4245
Division of Air Ouality Control Phone: 502/573-3382
803 Schenkel Lane, Frankfort, KY 40601 Fax: 502/573-3787
Revenue Cabinet Phone: 502/564-4581
Department of Tax Administration Phone: 502/564-5523
Division of Compliance and Tax Payer Assistance Fax: 502/564-2906
Miscellaneous Tax Section, Severance Tax Unit
200 Fair Oaks Lane, Frankfort, KY 40619
Department of Property Valuation Phone: 502/564-8334
Division of Technical Support, Mineral Valuation Section Fax: 502/564-5977
200 Fair Oaks Lane, 4th Floor, Frankfort, KY 40620
Transportation Cabinet Phone: 502/564-7183 A
Division of Planning, Coal Haul Section Fax: 502/564-2865
125 Holmes Street, Frankfort, KY 40622
UK - Center for Applied Energy Research Phone: 859/257-0305
Research Park Drive, Lexington, KY 40511-8433 Fax: 859/257-0220
United States Department of Energy Phone: 202/586-8800 '
National Energy information Ctr., El-30, Forrestal Bldg., IE-248 Fax: 202/586-0727
1000 Independence Ave., Washington, DC 20585
Workforce Development Cabinet Phone: 502/564-7976 .
Dept. for Employment Services, Research and Statistics Branch Fax: 502/564-2937
Employment and Wages Section
275 E. Main Street, CHR Building, Frankfort, KY 40621
Web site addresses: most reference sources have a web site address listed at the bottom of each
page. Additional data can be obtained atthese web sites. All addresses are world wide web (www),
except as otherwise noted (i.e.,1tp://ftp.), and the (http://) is implied on each address although not
listed due to space limitations.
Example - [http://wwwcoaleducation.org]
Acknowledgment _ _ ‘
Tears Francis, Desktop Publishing Krina Fry, Graphic Designer

 Table of Contents
Highlights ...................................................................................................... i
Changes and Trends ...................................................................................... 1
References .................................................................................................... 2
Contents ....................................................................................................... 3
History of Coal ............................................................................................ 4, 5
Types of Mining ............................................................................................. 6
Production
U.S. Production ............................................................................................. 7
Kentucky Production ..................................................................................... 8
‘ County Production ......................................................................................... 9
Employment
Employment ................................................................................................. 10
· Employment/ Productivity ............,............................................................... 11
Safety and Training ................................................................................. 12,13
Employment / Wages by County ................................................................... 14
Economy
Severance Tax by County ............................................................................. 15
Coal Taxes Returned to Counties ................................................................... 16
Economic Impact .................................................................................... 17,18
Coal Prices ................................................................................................... 19
Coal Markets
Transportation ........................................................................................ 20, 21
Uses of Coal ................................................................................................. 22
Quality - Utility Shipments ............................................................................ 23
Kentucky Coal Shipments to Electric Power Plants ................................. 24,25
Distribution — State to State .......................................................................... 26
Coal Exports / imports .................................................................................. 27
Envrronme nt
Air Quality / By-Products .............................................................................. 28
Reclamation ................................................................................................. 29
Post-Mining Land Uses ........................................................................... 30, 31
r AML Reclamation ......................................................................................... 32
r Coal Resources
Coal Origin and Properties ............................................................................. 33
U.S. Comparisons—Production ....................................................................... 34
r U.S. Coal Reserves ...................................................................................... 35
Kentucky Coal Resources ....................................................................... 36, 37
, Coal Properties / Improvements .................................................................... 38
Teacher Resources
www.coaIeducation.org ................................................................................. 39
PCs + www. = kWh°°a' .............................................................................. 40
‘ Coal Education Field Trip Sites in Kentucky ................................................... 41
Coal-Fired Power Plant Tours ........................................................................ 42
Electrrcrty
Coal- Low Cost Energy ............................................................................... 43
Coal—into—Kilowatts ................................................................................. 44, 45
U.S. Electric Utility/ Non-Utility ..................................................................... 46
Kentucky Coal-Fired Power Plants ................................................................ 47
Electricity Costs ........................................................................................... 48
information Assistance ................................................................................. 49

 History of Coal
1701 Coal discovered in Virginia.
1748 First recorded U.S. coal production.
1750 April 13th - Dr. Thomas Walker was the first recorded person to discover
and use coal in Kentucky.
1755 Lewis Evan’s map showing coal in what is now the Greenup County and
Boyd County area of Kentucky.
1758 First commercial U.S. coal shipment. _
1792 Issac Shelby becomes the first Governor of Kentucky (1792-1796). l
1820 First commercial mine, known as the "McLean drift bank" opened in .
Kentucky, near the Green River and Paradise in Muhlenberg County. (
328 short tons mined and sold in Kentucky.
1830 2,000 tons of Kentucky production.
1837 10,000 tons of Kentucky production.
1843 100,000 tons of Kentucky production. ,
1850 150,000 tons of Kentucky production.
Lexington and Big Sandy Railroad proposed.
Kentuclgr Geological Sun/ey established.
1860 Pre-Civil War Kentucky production record of 285,760 tons. l
1861 Kentucky-born Abraham Lincoln becomes the 16th President of the
United States (1861-65). ‘
1866 Surface mining begins near Danville, Illinois.
1870 Post-Civil War Kentucky production decline to 150,582 tons. l
St. Louis & Southern Railroad completed from Henderson to Earlington, Ky. l
1872 First train off the Big Sandy Railroad.
1877 Coal mined with steam-powered shovel.
1879 One million tons of Kentucky production.
1880 Mechanical stokers introduced.
First coke ovens in west Kentucky.
Mine Ventilation Law.
First train from Williamson, West Virginia to Pike County, Kentucky.
Coal mining machines come into general use.
1890 N&W RaiIroad’s first mine at Goody in Pike County.
Hopkins County in west Kentucky leading coal producer in the state for
18 straight years.
Miner Pay Law.
United Mine Workers of America formed.
Machines developed to undercut coalbeds.
5,000 kilowatt steam turbine generates electricity.
1900 Child Labor Law.
Edgewater Coal Company’s first production in Pike County.
First train off the Lexington and Eastern Railroad.
independent Geological Sunrey established.
1910 First train from the Cumberland Valley Railroad. _.
Fordson Coal Company’s first production at Pond Creek.
Pike-Floyd Coal Company’s first production at Betsy Layne. ;
1914 World War l increases demand for coal; Kentucky production
20.3 million tons. _
Short-flame or "permissible" explosives developed. ;
Mine Safety Law.
1918 First pulverized coal firing in electric power plants.
1920 Federal Mineral Leasing Act.
42.1 million tons of Kentucky production. I
1923 All-time high U.S. employment of 704,793 bituminous coal and ·
lignite miners.
First dragline excavators built especially for surface mining.
1929 Stock market crashes beginning the Great Depression.
1932 Walking dragline excavators developed.
1936 47.7 million tons of Kentucky production .
1940 World War ll - coal production in Kentucky rises to 72.4 million tons
for the war effort.
4 [www.coaleducatlon.org/coalhistory/]

 l
· l
  History of Coal
1940 Auger surface mining introduced.
1942 Republic Steel Company's first production at Road Creek, Kentucky.
Post-War Marshall Plan — production rises to 88.7 million tons
in Kentucky.
Continuous underground mining systems developed.
Kentucky Water Contamination Legislation.
V 1947 Kentucky Coal Association founded.
l 1950 82.2 million tons of Kentucky production.
, 1956 Fish and Wildlife Coordination Act.
, Railroads converting from coal to diesel fuel.
Roof bolting introduced in underground mines.
1960 Railroads began using unit coal trains.
First longwall mining with powered roof supports.
, Kentucky Surface Mining Legislation.
1963 Kentucky coal production exceeded 100 million tons.
1966 National Historic Preservation Act.
C&O Railroad to .lohn’s Creek constructed in Pike County.
l 1969 Federal Coal Mine Health and Safety Act.
1970 A Federal Clean Air Act.
‘ 1972 Kentucky Coal Severance Tax established.
_ Federal Water Pollution Control Act.
  Kentucky becomes the leading coal production state.
) 1973 Endangered Species Act.
OPEC oil embargo: Coal production and prices rise.
1976 Federal Coal Leasing Amendments Act.
1977 Federal Surface Mine Control and Reclamation Act.
1980 Congress enacts the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program
(NAPAP) Study, a 10 year research program.
1983 OPEC cuts oil prices for first time.
Martha Layne Collins becomes Kentucky‘s first woman governor (1983-87).
U.S. Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program established.
1988 Kentucky Supreme Court rules that the unmined minerals tax on coal is
subject to the same state and local property tax rates as other real estate.
T)/A 160-MW Atmospheric Fluidized Bed Combustion Unit on line.
Wyoming displaces Kentucky as the leading coal producing state.
1990 Federal Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990.
Kentucky record production - 179.4 million tons.
U.S. coal production exceeds 1 billion tons.
1992 U.S. Energy Policy Act of 1992.
1993 CEDAR, lnc. (Coal Education Development & Resources) formed in Pike County.
1994 Western Kentucky CEDAR, lnc. formed in Webster and Union counties.
1996 Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) issues Order 888,
  addressing the issues of open access to encourage wholesale
competition in the electric utility industry and FERC Order 889, requiring
I utilities to share information about available transmission capacity.
1996 Workers' Comp Reform Laws passed in Kentucky.
‘ 1997 The Kentucky Fish and Wildlife Commission re-introduced free ranging elk
_ into East Kentucky on post-mined lands.
1997 Kentucky Coal Association celebrates 50 years ol service.
1998 Mountaintop mining comes under attack.
1998 Federal synthetic fuel tax credit for use of coal fines begins.
I 2001 Natural gas prices increase over 50% in one year.
= Electricity shortages result in rolling blackouts in California.
Kentucky permits two coaI—fired electric power plants, first in 20 years.
September 11, 2001 — America is attacked.
AMERlCA'S SECURE FUEL FOR ELECTRIC ENERGY ——— COAL
Sources; Energy information Administration, Coal Data; A Reference, 1989, Kentucky Department of Mines and
Minerals, Annual Reports, and Willard Rouse Jillson, Coal lndustry in Kentucky, 1922.
[www.coaleducationorg/coalhistory] 5  

 Kentucky has two distinct coal fields, each containing numerous deposits of bit-
uminous coal of various characteristics and mines of every type and size. By the
use of large draglines and shovels, the excavation of two or more coal seam de-
posits (multi-seam mining) is possible inthe large area surface mines of the gently
rolling Western Kentucky coal field and inthe large mountaintop removal mines in
. the steeper terrain of the Eastern Kentucky coal field. Both the Eastern and Western
Kentucky coal fields have large, modern, and efficient underground mines (of various
entry types) utilizing improved mining methods with increased mechanization includ-
ing continuous miners, longwall mining panels, or both. _
0f Kentucky’s 130.7* million Surface
tons of 2000 coal production,
80.2 milliontonswere produced y
by underground mining methods w e  
and 50.5 million tons were  
produced by surface mining *¤·"
m . . .
ethods $$0 *0 Digmggt
9p.¤éé’ go°¤s¤g¢2@g
*NOTE: This isthe official U.S. DOE _O€t8.°6o‘;q5%°§€5&q°¤
numberforKentucky. State and Federal /¤rPHl$’*l·i*“*{*"‘°··"#*‘··Y1
numbers will differ. Please see page 8 _
r0rdmnS_ Area Surface Mine
Mountaintop Removal
A breakdown of the different
types of surface and under-
ground mining methods used Surface
in Kentucky is as follows:
- . . .   ‘\\\\\\\‘;
2000 Minmg Type Estimates *““
No.of Production COTTTOUT/AUQ0l’IVIlfl0
Mine Type Mines (million tons)
sunaee 162 sos U"d‘°"g'°““d
Surface 0nly* - 12.6
sunaee a Auger* - sea fg E"' ""
Auger Mining* - 1.6   //
in !' ‘ /
Underground 246 80.2  
cnnrrnnnnw - eas Drift Mine
Conventional** - 1.7
LongwalI** — 10.0 ? _
Ommtt _ 02 Underground   _ »
 ····"  il i
StateTotaIs 408 130.7   \
*NOTE: Surface mining type estimates are '
based upon Kentucky Department of Mines -- S HE
and Minerals’ License data. D
**NOTE: Underground mine type and
production estimates are determined by Underground & A
the U.S.DOE-ElA when mines produce  gx Xé
greater than 50 percent of their output by i Eg $2, {E
one ofthe underground mine types listed 1 ‘='  
i°°”i A  
Sources: Kentucky Department of Mines and
Minerals, Annual Regan, 2000. us. poe - I lll I
  nrusf A niur L   
ttf -= Source: U.S. DOE - EIA Coal Data; A Reference, 1989.
6 lwww.eia.d0e.gov/fuelcoalhtml] and [www.caer.uky.edu/kdmm/homepage.htm]
   
   

   U.S. Coal Production  
KY and U.S. Coal Preduetion* 1970-2000 (millions of ions)
Kentucky United Kentucky as
Year Eastern Western Total States % of U.S.
1970 72.5 52.8 125.3 602.9 20.8
1971 71.6 47.8 119.4 552.2 21.6
1972 68.9 52.3 121.2 595.4 20.4
1973 74.0 53.7 127.6 591.7 21.6
1974 85.4 51.8 137.2 603.4 22.7
1975 87.3 56.4 143.6 648.4 22.1
‘ 1976 91.1 52.8 144.0 678.7 21.2
1977 94.0 52.3 146.3 691.3 21.2
1978 96.2 39.5 135.7 665.1 20.4
1979 104.1 42.5 146.5 777.9 18.8
1980 109.2 41.0 150.1 829.7 18.1
‘ 1981 117.9 39.7 157.6 823.8 19.1
1982 111.2 39.0 150.2 838.1 17.9
1983 95.6 35.6 131.2 782.1 16.8
1984 117.3 42.3 159.5 895.9 17.8
1985 113.3 39.0 152.3 883.6 17.2
1986 112.7 41.2 153.9 890.3 17.3
1987 119.9 45.3 165.2 918.8 18.0
1988 117.5 40.3 157.9 950.3 16.6
1989 125.7 41.6 167.4 980.7 17.1
1990 128.4 44.9 173.3 1,029.1 16.8
1991 117.2 41.8 159.0 996.0 16.0
1992 119.4 41.7 161.1 997.5 16.2
1993 120.2 36.1 156.3 945.4 16.5
1994 124.4 37.2 161.6 1,033.5 15.6
1995 118.5 35.2 153.7 1,033.0 14.9
1996 117.0 35.5 152.4 1,063.9 14.3
1997 120.9 34.9 155.9 1,089.9 14.3
1998 116.7 33.6 150.3 1,118.1 13.4
1999 110.0 29.6 139.6 1,100.4 12.7
2000 105.0 25.8 130.7 1,073.6 12.2
*NOTE: This isthe official U.S. DOE numbertor Kentucky. State and Federal numbers will difter. Please
see page Stordetails.
2000*** Millions
, Rank State of Tons
  ieading Coal Produeers** 1 wyoming _ 333.3
2 West Virginia 158.3
Kentucky ranked third inthe United States in coal 2 ,*§;§i,¤S°*,,Yan,a  
production during 2000. _ 5 ,5,,5Sy ,,95
6 Montana 38.4
  3 * 0 liti  
‘ 2
:2 y,   Montana
*5 800 · ,;.5+* `*i“   5I` Texas
g i 5  5,,.       5555755 _   ....... ,,,,,,0,5 ,
- E 600 v -  .     T  3 .    P‘*“"S"“’"'*‘
gr .7         . ,»3— ;     W.Virei¤i3
O   .     rr     5      __`.
3.% 400   ._,.. Y   7*3· r¤:Z5?Le»i" .   —»7»       arer  
3 y ,_,, ——      — ` ' _
E 5 _   5,,.   i5.i{[f¥‘$Qf€YQ»°*” i *1i` Wyoming
°‘ 200 I  Q.    L 1}10 , . .    . .   A
   {                                   Kentucky
0 " *3   l `‘’*   i 3 l  —` ~ 3  ,... ` .» , .   ~ V ~ sl
1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000
**NOTE: Wyoming, Texas, and Montana were notamong thetop seven coal producers in 1970, but are
includedto showtheirriseto be amongthe leading coal-producing states.
***NOTE: See page 34, U.S. Comparisons - Production.
Sources: U.S. DOE - Energy Information Administration; Coal lndustg; Annual, 1993-2000, Coal Production, l
1977-1992. U.S. Bureau ot Mines, Minerals Yearbook, 1970-1976.
[www.eia.doe.gov/tuelcoalhtml]   A

   k it P u ‘
  entuc y ro uction
Kentucky produced 131.8* million tons of bituminous coal in 2000, down fromthe
record of 179.4 million tons set in 1990.
 
  Under round    .  
  I   S“"a°€ HK
100 E''’i     i’'i;i’   Q .l.. .   WKY
2  
0 120  
hi       ‘    
3  .  ..;.v» 1  
5   l—,‘§ jii?}i3Qf§jL§Xi;f€i‘ WKY
 2121512-1~;
 :5    :‘.     r~tr {  EE;i?;i%¥§‘{E`?%  ,<;
1950 1995 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000
*NOTE: State production numbers differ slightly from yearly federal U.S. DOE - Energy information
Administration (EIA) production numbers, due to minor differences in their methodology (i.e., clean coal
versus raw). Please note whether Federal or State numbers are referenced when using a value.
Source: Kentucky Department of Mines and Minerals, Annual Reports, 1950-2000.
  ‘rtt   et Mines, 1984-2008
Kentuck Eastern Kentuc Western Kentuc
Year Surface Underground Total Surface Underground Total Surface Underground Total
1984 1,137 926 2,063 1,026 900 1,926 111 26 137
1985 937 921 1,858 836 897 1,733 101 24 125
1986 723 830 1,553 633 802 1,435 90 28 118
1987 612 816 1,428 532 791 1,323 80 25 105
1988 492 738 1,230 426 714 1,140 66 24 90
1989 429 670 1,099 358 644 1,002 71 26 97
1990 360 627 987 301 601 902 59 26 85
1991 296 542 838 243 513 756 53 29 82
1992 270 482 752 225 459 684 45 23 68
1993 250 446 696 197 425 622 53 21 74
1994 248 425 673 206 401 607 42 24 66
1995 237 361 598 201 339 540 36 22 58
1996 237 307 544 197 287 484 40 20 60
1997 221 308 529 193 289 482 28 19 47
1998 205 277 482 186 259 445 19 18 37
1999 198 260 458 178 243 421 20 17 37
2000 162 246 408 148 234 382 14 12 26
Source: U.S.DOE - Energy information Administration, Coal lndustpg Annual 1993-2000, Coal Production 1984-92.
  et Mine Licenses ie Keetueky `
The number of actual mines is smaller than the final number of mine licenses issued
each year. A new license is required when the company name or ownership changes.
0000 - Z  Surface ‘
g 4500   ,.... , ,...,. .   H f9f UH
G)   " .. .t ff Z . · .
3000   .,,.     ,  ·-.-  
5      
    1t~l    
  1,.;· E  
0  1·=.‘,1.‘...»,·   ·1·-  
1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000
Source: Kentucky Department ot Mines and Minerals, Annual Reports, 1950-2000.
8 {www.caer.uky.edu/kdmm/homepagehtm]

 l   County Production
There were 408 mines in Kentucky during 2000.
These 408 mines were issued 605 Kentucky mine
licenses and produced 131 .8 million tons.
246 underground mines (323 licenses) accounted for  
62% ot Kentucky’s production and 162 surface mines
(282 licenses) accounted for 38% ot Kentucky’s _
production. ·•I.I IEI '
_ 78% ot Western Kentucky and 57% ot Eastern
Kentucky's coal production was from underground
mines during 2000.
28 Kentucky counties produced coal in 2000: nine Western Kentucky counties and
‘ 19 Eastern Kentucky counties.
2000 Production by County and Type oi Mine License*
Underground Surface Total
County Licenses Tonnage Licenses Tonnage Licenses Tonnage
EASTERN KENTUCKY
Bell 16 2,608,541 15 1,254,240 31 3,862,781
eraalnln - - 8 1,021,686 8 1,021,686
Clay - - 2 22,118 2 22,118
Estill - - 1 42,074 1 42,074
Floyd 38 2,099,604 2 849 40 2,100,453
Harlan 40 7,746,358 18 2,474,757 58 10,221,115
Johnson 4 500,162 3 371,898 7 872,060
knon 35 6,176,318 25 5,559,184 60 11,735,502
Knox 10 378,100 5 1,000 15 379,100
Laurel — - 4 63,369 4 63,369
Lawrence 2 529,869 3 134,457 5 664,326
Leslie 8 5,281,827 1 1,310,293 10 6,541,620
Lamnar 31 5,275,874 41 4,745,885 72 10,021,759
Martin 15 4,786,070 10 5,142,267 25 9,928,337
Morgan 1 7,760 3 52,812 4 60,572
Owsley - - 2 22,357 2 22,357
Perry 14 5,869,601 17 6,547,400 31 12,417,001
Pike 91 18,731,242 87 15,351,814 178 34,083,056
Whitley 8 15,800 8 216,903 12 232,703
EKYTotal 309 59,956,626 256 44,335,363 565 104,291,989
WESTERN KENTUCKY
Butler - — 1 16,665 1 16,665
cnrlstlan - - 1 197,900 1 197,900
‘ Daviess - - 3 769,963 3 769,963
Henderson 1 746,827 1 1,114,335 2 1,891,162
Hopkins 4 4,269,713 11 1,980,922 15 6,250,635
Muhlenberg 3 1,939,881 5 1,331,184 8 3,271,065
Ohio - - 2 274,061 2 274,061
Union 2 5,738,248 - - 2 5,738,248
Webster 4 8,848,474 2 295,826 8 9,144,300
WKY Total 14 21,543,143 26 6,010,856 40 27,553,999
KY Totals 323 81,499,769 282 50,346,219 6115 131,845988
*NOTE: The number of licenses is greater than the number of mines because a mine may be relicensed if
the company changes name or ownership. (
Source: Kentucky Department of Mines and Minerals, Annual Report, 2000. ‘
[www.caenuky.edu/kdmm/homepage.htm] 9 U

 The Kentucky coal mining industry has a current workforce of approximately 15,500*
people directly employed in coal mining jobs. The Western Kentucky coal field
directly employs approximately 2,510 persons, while the Eastern Kentucky coal field
provides 1 2,990directminingiobs.
. . Eastern Kentucky
Kentucky’s Coal Mining com plaid
Work Force, 2000 Surface 4162
Underground 8,828
Western Kentucky Total 12-990 ·
Coal Field
some 450  
Underground 2,060    h  
Total 2,510 % 
 » ,,,      W  
    E @    ` r
.  tmu     ‘ 
  °’ 
_ q   md.£@      ,,,   -
Eastern Kentucky averaged 84% of Kentucky’s coal mining workforce and account-
ed for about 80% of Kentucky’s total coal production in 2000.
Western Kentucky averaged 16% of Kentucky’s coal mining work force and account-
ed for about 20% of Kentucky’s total coal production in 2000.
Kentucky produced 130.7 milliontons during 2000 while direct mining employment
continued to decline.
Kentucky Coal Mining Employment, 1979-2000
Western Kentucky Eastern Kentucky Kentucky
Year Surface Underground Total Surface Underground Total Totals
1979 4,343 6,945 1 1 ,288 12,838 23,064 35,902 47,190
1980 3,995 7,879 11 ,874 11 .819 22,702 34,521 46,395
1981 4,056 6,489 10,545 13,473 24,032 37,505 48,050
1982 4,120 5,639 9,759 12,319 22,782 35,101 44,860
1983 3,415 4,918 8,333 10,485 17,615 28,100 36,433
1984 4,022 4,053 8,075 11 ,327 18,474 29,801 37,876
1985 3,421 4,294 7,715 10,516 18,583 29,099 36,814 ·‘
1986 2,327 4,297 6,624 8,718 17,312 26,030 32,654
1987 2,345 4,605 6,950 8,740 16,900 25,640 32,590
1988 1,825 4,388 6,213 8,261 16,085 24,346 30,559
1989 1,870 4,166 6,036 8,034 16,586 24,620 30,656 _A
1990 2,095 3,491 5,586 7,505 17,407 24,912 30,498
1991 1,910 3,603 5,513 6,251 14,878 21,129 26,642
1992 1,722 3,483 5,205 6,014 13,405 19,419 24,624
1993 1,887 3,465 5,352 5,683 13,028 18,711 24,063
1994 1,803 2,988 4,791 5,728 12,849 18,577 23,368
1996 1,109 3,176 4,285 5,474 11,366 16,840 21,125
1996 1,095 2,601 3,696 4,855 10,275 15,130 18,826
1997 937 2,578 3,515 5,053 10,369 15,422 18,937
1998 747 2,763 3,510 5,493 9,924 15,417 18,927
1999 615 2,309 2,924 4,973 9,314 14,287 17,21 1
2000 450 2,060 2,510 4,162 8,828 12,990 15,500
*NOTE: State employment numbers (page 14) differ from federal ElA numbers.
Source; U.S. DOE — EIA; Coal lndustry Annual, 1993-2000, Coal Production, 1979-1992.
1 0 [www.eia.doe.gov/fuelcoal.html]

 Employment/Productivity
Kentucky Coal Mine Employment, 1979-2000
§  
1-E 30   » 4   .._ . .=   .1 
K   -.;;;.... 
1979 1982 1985 1988 1991 1994 1997 2000
*State employment numbers (page 14) differ from federal EIA numbers.
Mine Pro