xt712j684094 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt712j684094/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19351203  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, December  3, 1935 text The Kentucky Kernel, December  3, 1935 1935 2013 true xt712j684094 section xt712j684094 Best Copy Available

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KERNEL

SEMI-WEEKL-

UNIVERSITY
VOL. XXVI.

Delia Chi
CLUB Injured Tennessee
Selects Title Of BOOKS SPITALNY Players Condition

UNIQUE PROGRAM Sigma

VESPER

bers of Sigma Delta Chi, men's
Journalism fraternity, selected "The
Sour Mash" as the title of their
new humor magazine, which Is to
be released during second semes- -

ONLY GROUP OF ITS
KIND IN AMERICA

IS YOUNGEST OF
MUSICAL FAMILY

Peterson, Lewis Harp Duo to tcr registration
Be Featured Next
The suggestion for the

Returns from Engagement
at Famous Florida

selected
title was made by Raymond T. Lathrem, who will be awarded a
school-lif- e
subscription to the magazine. The Judges considered the
title, "The Sour Mash," a particu
larly fitting one, the best of a large
number of suggestions received by
the fraternity's committee. Lathrem.
flnncr of the award, Is a sophomcre
,n lne
"ege oi Ans ana sciences,
member or Phi Sigma Kappa so- -

Sunday

Bringing to the camn" on
f
the most interesting and unique
programs enjoyed by vesner audiences In the past few seasons, the
Old Harp Singers, purveyors of
American fol' lore, presented
the
flfth of the Sunday afternoon ves- per mir'enie series at 4 p. m. Sun- day in Memorial hall.
'
me,m"
The performers, elsht in number.
ut
vJiubUclty 8ta"
by E. J. Gatwood, were
direct
seated around a table, and as th-- y sl"dnt
Definite plans for the publishing
rang kept time by clapping their
;
hands, an effect which was charm- organization feels
tag and which added much to the
""I,.
presentation of the numbers. The mum, it win nave a magazine mai.
m, M JCM ,H CUJJT V LO
.. ... Mb
.f
blending of voices and regularity of will h. w
pitch and quality were outstanding. type in the country. The first ediTwelve numbers were presented tion will be one of 32 pages conby the singers, as follows: "Holy taining stories, illustrations and
Manna," "Schenectady," "The Mary Jokes, the latter being original on
Golden Tree,"
"The Trees Do the campus.
Moan," "Babe of Bethlehem," "GypThe contest being held to select
sy Laddie," "All is Well," "Amaz- - the best short story and the best
Ing Orace." "Gabriel's Awful short short story will close today.
Trump." "Hebrew Children," "Poor If there is anyone who has not yet
Wayfaring Stranger," and "Soldier, turned in his or her Intended con- Won't You Marry Me" Each song trlbution they may yet do so. All
waa of American folk origin, and stories must be received by Norman
a short explanation of each num- Garllne at the Kernel office before
ber was given. The program con- (p.m. today.
sisted of ballads, carols, spirituals,
and old drinking tunes. Outstanding numbers were the carols "Babe
of Bethlehem,"
and "Amazing
Grace," and the ballads "The Mary
Golden Tree," and the familiar
"Soldier, Wont You Marry Me."
The Old Harp Singers are from
Nashville, Tennessee, and boast one
.
.
XT
r, .
of the only organizations of its ituiisiici iiiiw jciiin ivenears- ed; Will Be Given at
kind in America. Personnel of the
company Includes:
sopranos, JusTraining School
tine Tigert, Glenn Carroll; altos,
Auditorium
Mary Dennis:
Arlene Richardson.
tenors, Robert Dowden, James Mc- - ' "Old Kentucky
Minstrels," now
Glothlin; and basses, E. J. Gat in production and sponsored by
wood and Wayne Barker. George Rt.TOllpm will ha irtvAn in t Via Trn i,i
Pullen Jackson Is folklore advisor. m(f
auditorium on Friday,
Dec. 13, at 8 o'clock. A limited
.
.
..
1
1
.1.,..,
Ttr 1 TWT OrKerS TT
cc"ls eBcn
V
may be obtained from active mem-- ;
of the organization.
TO
liOUrS
Featu:ed on the programs is the

'?7,,

"e
.

Resort

,

S

By JIMMY ANDERSON
Once every so often there comes
to the front a family whose name
is destined to become nuttindlnn
in some particular field. Such a
famllv Is the Soitalnys' who as ev- eryone knows gave three sons to
the neia or musical entertainment
and each one has outstanding lame
In his own right.
Maurice Splta'.ny, who Is to appear at the Interfraternlty formal
on December 7, is the youngest of

mTSr "oflhe S?i
,,..
j
Broadcastln,
.

comDanv of New
.
ouonjr v., i nun .v.. Hiiu
imucu run, mc
die one, for many years at New
York's outstanding hotels and cafes
and now is creating a new idea
with his excellent girl's orchestra.
Now Maurice is upholding his end
i of the great Spitalny
name with his
marvelous
fourteen piece dance
combination.
The Spltalnys are natives of
Odessa, Russia, and were brought
to the United Sta'es when babies.
They are instinctively
musical,
having started from the moment
they could distinguish between a
piano and a bass horn. Maurice
studied abroad and after p.aying
several concerts, he became connected with the Cleveland Symphony orchestra.
The theatre then beckoned and
like his brothers before him, Maurice established
himself In the
theatre Dit of Cleveland's R. K. O.
Palace, where he worked for several
years. Public demand scon drew
him into the dance and pooulir
field, and with his dance band he
has for the last two years plaved
In the country's outstanding hotels
and night clubs. His most recent
engagement was at the swanky
Coral Gables Country club (Florida), where he is scheduled to return again next season.
Maurice Spitalny, himself, is a
I
o
cm tit, h
Iran fol
-- ro ft la
mcwo
B""- -.
whose famous violin has placed him
wltn Rubinoff and others at the
top of the popuiar and syrnphonlc
orchestra world.
unlver,,t quarieue, "me
Each member of the Spitalny orsevera, tlmM
al3 wno wlu
is of
calibre and
There will als be choruses composed chestratake his soloist In any sym
could
place
of the best talent on the campus, phonic as well as
.
.,
in a popular or
.
-- t
i
t
T

11

!

STROLLERS TO

i

!

IMA

Get Extra

Unrea

vacations,

Famj

Necessitate Acquiring
Time Now
Because the next two work
months for NYA students will be
cut short due to Christmas holidays
and semester examinations. Dean
T. T. Jones Is urging all University
students working under the NYA to
work off as many extra hours as
they can this month so that they
can get all their hours in for the
next two months.
The current work month will end
December 12 when the next time
report will be due. During the next
month, December 12 to January 12,
NYA students will not be able to
work but two weeks because of the
Christmas vacation. The following
month semester examinations wi.l
limit the amount of time that students will be able to work.

PRESENT SHOW

Admtr-utrisim-

:

i

Road" and "Old Man River."
The program will consist of three
danres and iokes will
Intersperse the entire performance.

v..

'

Elect

Intercollegiate
The Kentucky
PresT Bssoc'ation will meet Friday
and Faturday, Dec. 6 and 7, at Western Ftate Teachers college, Bowling
Nontian Garlinir. prident
of the association, and editor of the
Kentucky Kernel, will preside at all
sessions.
Registration will start at 9 o'clock
Frldav morning at th Cedar House.
Luncheon will be held Rt the same
plao at 12:15 o'clock Friduv with
Keen Johnson,
of Kentucky, and editor of
the Richmond Register, as guest of
honor and principal speaker.
On Frldav evening th visitors
will be the iHNts of the MamnWh
Cavo asportation for a tour of the
cae. s A hiiKtness "sslon at wMch
offtce-f"r the comln ver will he
el e'ed. will be conducted Saturday
momlng.

Barron, lecturer In
the Art department of the Univer- sity is scheduled to present an Il
lustrated lecture at 3:00 p. m. in
Room 314 of the University Library,
title of the talk is. "The Im- port an ce of the Bible in the His
tory of Art."
Mr. Joseph

GLEE CLUB TO TOUR

UK OFFICIALS

AT MEETING

Dean Paul P. Boyd and Prof.
Ezra L. Gillls are in Louisville this
week attending the annual meeting
of the Southern Association of
Colleges and Secondary
Schools.
Dean Boyd is a member of the commission on Higher Institutions.

Orn.

Llputenant-Oover-nor-et--

rt

I

,

BARRON TO GIVE ART TALK

here.

r

Wednesday Night
Dance Cancelled

won fame because of its nicety of
tone and beauty of tonal blend
wr,icj, can be produced only by
music of this type.

Newlv Translated

Work Is Off Press

KENTUCKY HIGH

SCHOOLS PRESS

RemainsUnchanged MEETING

Tennessee center, who was injured
in the Thanksgiving Day game, was
announced to be unchanged yesterday afternoon.
The mother of the Injured boy,
in a short Interview at the hospital yesterday, said, "Dr. Vance said
this morning that he isn't any
worse. He had a quiet night I
think. My husband and I appreciate everything that you have done
for us. No one will ever know how
grateful we are to the people of
Lexington for their kindness"
It is the sincere hope of the students and faculty here at the University of Kentucky that Herbert
Tade's condition will Improve rap-Idl- y.

IS SET

ANNDAL MEET

Berea

of the Kentucky High School Prcs association
will be held at the University on
Frldav and Saturday, December 13

The

1935 convention

The annual state YMCA student
and faculty conferences will be
held

to

at

Berea college, December 8

8.

Japanese Bazaar
This

-

cl

p,

n,

4.

.

T. B. Shots Will

s

T

WILL HOLD

U. K. STAFF MEMBERS
TO ADDRESS GROUP University Representatives to
Be Amonir State Officers
Prizes Will Be Awarded in
Present for Conference at

Various Departments of
Sheet Assemblage

Be Given Again

Sigma Xi Society
Hears Dr. Stewart

Electrical Engineers to be held Wednesday at 10 a. m. in Dicker hall.
H

The first meeting of the society
of Sigma Xi, honorary reserach fraternity, was held in the lecture
room of the chemistry bulidine. No
vember 22. Dr. O J. Stewart spoke
on the "Fundamental Assumptions
of Chemistry."
The society is an international
organization, membership to which
is granted to a University staff
member who has published some
paper of merit in a reputable scientific Journal. Seniors and graduate students of promise and ability may be elected as associate
members If, in the opinion of the
staff, they show Intention of continuing their research work.

Driving Cats Get Farly Lead
in (Jrme and Hold It
Over Surprised Vol
AffRregation
By MAX LANCASTER
Proving themselves superior in
every department of the game the
Kentucky Wildcats sent their ancient rivals, the Tennessee Volunteers, home on the short end of the
27 to 0 score Thanksgiving Day in
one of the most thrilling games
ever played on Stoll field to the delight of 16,000 rabid fans.
It was one of the largest scores
ever rolled up by cither team
the other. In 1933 the Vote
played on 5ton neia ana me score
was 27 to 0, but in Tennessees
favor. The 1933 and 1935 scores are
the largest either team has scored.
The 27 points scored this year
not only meant victory for the Cats
but also meant the first time the
Big Blue has scored on the Volunteers since 1931. In that year the
teams deadlocked in a 9 to 6 score,
keeping Tennessee from an invitation to the Rose Bowl. It also
meant the first Kentucky victory
since 1925 when Len Tracy led the
Wildcats to a 23 to 20 victory over
the Volunteers. It was In this year
that the "battle of the keg" was
started. Kentucky kept the keg for
one year and his week Is the first
time it has rested on Wildcat territory since 1926.
Kentucky
struck with terrific
force at the opening whistle and
proved to the 16.000 fans crowding
McLean stadium, that they were
not to be denied victory on this
y
memorable day. On one of
laterals, Davis tossed to McMillan on the Tennessee eight yard
line early in the first auarter and
"Double OO" traveled the remaining distance for the score but Referee Strupper ruled that the wh's le
had blown before Davis had passed
the ball and Tennessee whs saved
from a score for the time being.
At the start of the second quarter Kentucky took the ball on their
own 38 yard line after Tennessee
naa puntea. I ney marcned straigni
for the goal line and on a quarterback sneak from the two yard line
McMillan vent over for the marker. The Wildcat's second touchdown
came a few minutes later when
Johnson dropped back for a pass to
Ellington. A Tennessee man tipped
the ball slightly and Ellington slipped under the ball for a gain of 23
yards and a first down on the Vol
10. Simpson picked up two yards
and then Johnnn went wide around
his own right end for the Big Blue
second score.
Kentucky failed to register until
the fourth period. Skaggs, who
played a great game at tackle for
the Cats, leaped into the air and
intercepted a Tennessee paon
their own 26 yard line and he returned it to their 18 before he was
downed. Kentucky drove to the one
yard line from where Johnson carried it over. Prior to this play,
Tade, Tennessee center, was injured and had to be carried from
the field. A few minutes later
on Page Four)
then-man-

-

CLUB MEETS

club held its
The University
first meeting of the year Friday
evening, November 29, in the Livestock Judging pavilion. The purpose of this meeting was to have
students become better acquainted
with fellow club mermeers who are
enrolled in the University of Kentucky. The program consisted of
There will be a meeting of the
music, talks, games and refreshAgriculture society at 7:30 o'clock
ments.
Tuesday night in the Ag building.
DAIRY CLUB MEETS
There will be a meeting of the
The annual Dairy club breakfast "Student Parliament" at 7:15 o'given Thursday morning. No- clock. Thursday, Dec. 5, in Room 5
was
vember 28, at the University Com- of the Administration building.
mons. Maurice Meshew, president
of the club, was also the toastmas-te- r
MEETING SCHEDULE READY
The YWCA freshman group will
and gave the welcoming address
Anyone desiring a schedule of the and Introduced John W. Nutter and meet at 3 o'c'.eck Thursday afternoon
in the Women's building.
Miss
convention of the regional conferCarrolton Ball, guest speakers.
Gay of the English department will
ence for International Relations w.ll
speak on "Have You Read?"
be able to obtain one by applying
WILL REPRESENT CLUB
at the office of Dr. Amry Vanden-bosc- h
in the Administration buildStanley B. Zukerman, senior in
International Relations club will
ing. The convention is being held the College of Arts and Sciences,
4 p. m Wednesday aftermeet
in Huntington, W. Va., at Marshall will represent the University in the noon at
in Room 204 of the Adminicollege, Dec. 6 and 7.
Relaconference of International
stration building.
tions clubs of the Ohio Valley Dec.
7. The meeting will be held
6 and
at Marshall college, Huntington, W.
The Senior Cabinet of the YMCA
Va,
will hold its regular meeting at 7:15
O'clock Tuesday In the YMCA room.
Keys, sophomore honorary,
will
meet at 7 o'clock Thursday evening
The Freshman Cabinet of the
at the Lambda Chi Alpha house.
YMCA will hold its regular meeting
Alumni club in cooperation with the
at 7 15 o'clock Tuesday in the
Shinny
Alumni association.
YMCA rooms.
and his orchestra f urnished
the music.
A special pep meeting in honor
Sigma Delta Chi, honorary Jourof the winning Wildca's was held
nalistic fraternity, will have an
10 o'clock in the
Friday morning at
meeting at 8 o'clock tonight
Alumni gymnasium.
Short tulks
Aylesford place. All numat
Mcwere made bv Pres. Frank L.
NYA checks for students rebers and pledges please be present
Vey, Coach Cliet Wynne and Cupt.
ceiving Federal aid undi r thi
Nationul Youth administration
Jimmie Long, and Prof. Carl LampThe Pitkin club will hold Its regert led the singing of "On, On, U. huve been received and NYA
students may obtain them by ular meeting at noon Wednesday ,
of K." Each of the speakers made
at the Maxwell Street Presbytt: lun
calling at the business office,
mention of Herbie Tade, Tennessee
church.
Dean Jonis announced today.
seriously Injured in
center, who was
All NYA students expecting these
checks must cull at the bus.ness
the game, and asked that the stuStudents are warned agxinst
office today.
leaving their coats In the corridors
dents hope and pray for his
(Continued on Page Four)
H

Kampus
Kernels

Thousands Cheer As 'Cats Ride Crest Of Holiday
Wave That Washes Beer Keg On UK Shores
played, crowds milled in Rosemary Cllnkscules, band sponsor, and drum major Harold Stockton, were f.atures of the rally.
registered
alumni
Returning
Thursday morning in specially esheudquu: t.'rs Ui the lobtablished
bies of the Lafayette and Phoenix
hotels.
The Kentucky band met
the Tennessee muMc uus at the train
and Joined In intermittent marching
and playing throughout the morning.
The traditional beer keg, in the
hands of Tennessee since the last
Kentucky victory ten years ago. was
son lust week.
festivities began Wednesday nlifht returned to the Kentucky cheerwith a pep rally sponsored by SuKy, leaders at the half of the Vol-'CMusic by the battle in the afternoon.
campus pen cirri
"Best. Bund In Dixie," and speeches
The final feature of the day was
by James Park, prominent alumnus, a dance sponsored by the Lexington
Bands

and out of downtown hotels, returning old grads clapped each other
on tho buck and wrung hunds. fraternity and sorority Iwuses became
g
brothe:s
bedlums of
and sisters, 16.000 howling fans saw
of the trarenewal
a
ditional Volunteer- - Cat football but- 'Cats emerging on top
tie with the
by a 27-- 0 count, and the
beer keg came back to the
campus, as the University again
celtbrat d the Thanksgiving seahome-comin-

ht

long-abse-

nt

ut

21

16,000 Fans See Inspired
Cat Team Roll Up 27 to 0
Score Over Vol Gridders

The conference is under the
auspices of the state YMCA of
14.
Kentucky and the YMCA of Berea
and
On Friday among the events will college. The theme of the conferbe an address of welcome by Presi- ence is "Security".
The officers and members of the
dent Frank L. McVey and response
by Margaret Ellen Smith, president University senior and freshman
of the association, Danville High cabinets will attend the conference.
schools, and round table discussions Bart N. Peak, executive secretary
presided over by Miss Marguerite of the University YMCA will be the
McLaughlin, Professor Niel Plum-me- r, leader of one of the discussion
Mr. A. L. Danburg, Pikeville groups.
Cwens Will Sponsor
and a tea at Maxwell Place by PreThe speakers at the conference
sident and Mrs. McVey.
will be President William J Hutch-In- s,
For the division awards each
of Berea college; Mr. John
member newspaper mav submit as McCutcheon, president of the Berea
many
in each division as it
Murphy, genWeek wishes entries contest. The only YMCA; Mr. Herbert Berea YMCA:
for each
During
eral secretary of the
entry for Mr. Samuel Franklin, Jr., world
I requirement Is that each
I
each contest must be plainly marked traveler, writer and lecturer. New
Women's Honorary Will Hold and so indicated. Tear sheets may York city; Mr. E. S. Lotspelch, state
be used, or. In the case of news and secretary of the YMCA of KenThird Annual Bazaar,
feature stories and editorials, these tucky, Louisville.
Wed. and Thurs.
may be pasted on separate sheets
Discussion leaders for the various
of paper. Also only one division
Holtzen-dor- f,
Cwens, national leadership fra- may be marked in each paoer. that groups will be: Mr. P. B.
Jr., general secretary of the
ne contest nhniilH tw
ternity for sophomore women, will Is onlv
sponsor a Japanese bazaar in the marked in each issue because each YMCA, Clemson college. South Carpasrecreation room of Patterson hall contest is separated Into groups, and, olina; Dr. George E. Sweazy,
on Wednesday and Thursday, De- if two or more contests are marked tor of the Second Presbyterian
church, Danville, Kentucky; Mr. E.
cember 4 and 5, from 11 a m. to 8 In. the same isue, there is a chance S. Lotspelch,
state
o'clock that evening.
that one or more entries may be YMCA of Kentucky, secretary of the
Louisville.
A variety of Japanese novelties, overlooked.
s, kiincluding sandals, knick-knamust b- in the hands of
Entries
HOME EC SOCIETY
monos, bores, and coasters, have the directors by December 9.
been ordered from a Japanese ImHOLDS INITIATION
The divisions will be as follows:
porting company in New York, and Best
annual, best dewill be on sale at the bazaar.
The Home Economics club held
signed
annual, best
This is the third annual Japan- magazine, best
newsoa-pe- r. initiation services
and a banquet
ese bazaar to be sponsored by
Class One, (over 250 students), Monday evening, November 25, In
Cwens. Held every year' before best
newspaper. Class the Agricultural building.
Christmas, an opportunity is given Two, (under 250 s'udents), best
Mr. Jo.vph Barron gave an illusto all students and townspeople to news story, best headline, best ad- trated talk on "Five Hundred Miles
buy novel gifts for the holidays.
vertising make-ubest feature ar- of American Architecture."
ticle, best editorial and best sports
The following girls were initiated: Charlotte Percival, Jeanetie
FORMER STUDENT PROMOTED section.
Certificates of merit will be Watts, Dorothy Emmet, Frances
Austin T. Graves, '29, was elected awarded to the first five places In Young, Julia Hall, Mary Jordan
Odor, Eleanor Howard, Main Eba,
assistant treasurer of Marshall each of the above contests as certi- Jane Eavis, Marie Marcum,
Juanlta
Field Sc Co, Chicago, with whom fied by the Judges.
Lewis, Alyce Swope, Belgen Men-ce- r,
he has been associated since 1930.
Mary Marshall. Mallie Taylor,
FORMER EDITOR MARRIES
Mr. Graves received his B. S. in
OUie Mae Boyers, Bina Balrd, LouCommerce and was a member of
ise Combs, Beverly Richards, Mary
Sigma Phi Epsllon social fraternity,
Miss Lucille D. Mvers, Lexington, Jane Braty, Cornelia Crafton, Byrd
SuKy circle Men's Glee Club, Phi and Mr. Wesley E. Carter. Elizabeth-towKendall,
Greenwade, Louise
were married Saturday night Nichols, Ruth
Mu Alpha, and Delta Sigma Pi.
Marjorie Nass, Gladys
at. the, heme of the Rev. Dr. Homer
Thelkeld, Frances Bower.
W. Carpenter. Mr. Carter is editor
LAWRENCE ATTENDS MEET
and publisher of the Hardin CounA. I. E. E. TO HEAR REED
Enterprise at Elizabethtown. and
Prof. A. J. Lawrence, of the Col- ty -,
wa- editor of the Kentucky Kernel
lege of Commerce, attended a meet"Some
Both Mr. and Mrs. Carter Aspects Commercial and Business
ing of the Southern Business Edu- 1933-3of Electrical Engineering"
Association, Thursday, Nov. were RTaduated from the Univercational
sity of Kentucky in the class of will be discussed by Mr. Washing29 through Sunday, Dec. 1, at Richton Reed, president of the Lexingmond, Va. Prof. Lawrence was re- 1934.
ton Utilities company, before a meetelected as editor of the association's
ing of the American Institute of

publication, "Modern Business Education," for the second consecutive
Dr. Henri Beaumont, Department year.
of Psychology, has recently com-Th- e
GREHAN TAKEN ILL
pleted a translation of a German
textbook on Child Psychology which
Prof. Enoch Grehan, head of the
has been published this week by
Farrar and Rinehart, Inc., New Department of Journalism, is ill at
York, and Allan and Unwln, Lon- his home on Desha Road. During
don.
his absence his classes are being
The title of the book, which in- conducted by Professors Plummer
cludes full instructions on giving and Portmann.
' developmental tests to children and
the complete Viennese tests for
children for the first six years of
DevelIffr Is: "Test'n Child-en'opment from Birth to School Age."
It was written by Dr. Charlotte
Buehler, of University of Vienna,
and Dr. Hildegard Hetzer, Teachers
College, Elbing, Germany.
Tuberculin tests will be given
this afternoon at the dispensary.
WIN NATIONAL CONTESTS
All who have not yet taken the
teit are urged to report to the
The annual Saddle and Sirloin
dispensary.
club, national Agricultural club, es
The following students will
say contest, was won for Kentucky
please report to the laboratory
four Kentucky Agricultural stuof the dispensary for the results
pictures: Theim
of their y
places.
fourteenth and sixteenth
Taurman, Edson Current, Louise
boys are: Paul McComas,
The
Current, Herbert Bertram, Fred
James D. Toy, Carl Ca nenisch, and Stephens, Harry Alexander, BetWendell Binkley. The subject of
sy Allen, and Oren Dletz.
the essay was, "The Meat Animal
as a Farm Labor Saver."

hard-foug-

Announcement was made today by members of the Studt-n-t
Council of the University that
the Wednesday night dunce, usually held eve:y other week in
the gymnasium to procure funds
for the Student Union building,
will not be held this week, due
to social events occurring that
would conflict with the function.

wrv..

"--

Bni.

MEET

Johnson Will Address
Meeting1 at Bowling
Green

I

as

The Men's University Glee club,
under the direction of Prof. Carl
Lampert. will render a program in
the auditorium of the Lancaster
CANTATA IS PLANNED
High school, Lancaster, Friday evening, Dec. 6. at 7:30 o'clock. The
A Christmas cantata, "Mystery of
club will be assisted by the Univerthe Nativity" by Satis Coleman, sity Brass quartet.
will be presented by the University
elementary and University High
HIGH SCHOOL PRACTICES
schools In the training school auditorium December 16 and 17. It will
Tho University High school basbe presented to the btudents of
these schools at 1 o'clock Monday ketball team began practice about
afternoon, December 16, and to the three weeks ago under the direction
of Coach Pete Kemper in preparaparents at 7:30 Tuesday night.
tion for their first game with Athens High here Dec. 6. The squad
of fifteen ir. quickly getting in shapa
KIPA TO
for this first home game. There
will be a total of fifteen games
played this sason by the Purples, of
DECEMBER 6-- 7 which at least five will be played
Lieutenant-Governo-

NEW SERIES NO.

3, 1935

Ray Lathrem Suggests "The
Roy's Mother Expresses ApRepresentatives of Pnners of
Intrafrp.ternity Formal to
Sour Mash" As Name
preciation for Local
State Secondary Schools
Feature Rhythms of FamKindness
of Magazine
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After careful deliberation, memDecember 13
The condition of Herbert Tade,
December 7

Harp Sinpers Feature
Folk Sones at F'fth
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Old

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Humor Publication FOR ANNUAL HOP

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TODAY, DISPENSARY

KENTUCKY

OF

LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY, TUESDAY, DECEMI1KR

PRESENTED FOR

TUBERCULIN

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL

TUESDAY EDITION

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Aid Checks Today

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STUDENT RIGHTS MAINTAIN
THANKSGIVING
Kenuuky heat Tennessee Thanksgiving!
But there was no riotous manifestations of joy
on the part of the loyal Kentucky supporters who
had been denied this victory for ten years. That
afternoon a courageous lad from Tennessee had
lcen carried from the field seriously hurt.
That night at the dance there was no evidence
of exultation and hilarity which usually accompany such a victory over an ancient rival. All
thoughts of the game had been shoved into the
background by the concern which everyone had
for the outcome of the terrific struggle which
Herbie Tate was waging at the hospital less than
a block away.
This display of sportsmanship on the part of
the spectators is the real reason why Americans
people.
have become famous as a sports-lovinKentucky wanted dearly to win that game, but
certainly not at such a price.
Herbie Tade will recover and it was with
sighs of relief and gratitude that the men and
women of Kenucky learned that the crisis had
been passed successfully.
g

THE

1935

WILDCATS

The football season is over and it is time for
the Monday morning quarterback to go into action, concerning the status of the 1935 Wildcat
grid machine. In retrospect nothing but praise
can be said concerning our warriors of the Blue
and White. They have not always conquered
but they have certainly fought.
The efforts of the team are perhaps best
summed up in the words of Coach Wynne who,
in commenting on the season, said, "There has
never been any dissention of disloyalty among
the members of the squad at any time during
the season." Such spirit is remarkable in view
of the misfortunes in the way of injuries, bad
breaks, etc., which beset the Wildcats in
mid-seaso-

c

CHOICE OF LITERATURE OFFERS
STANDARD FOR JUDGMENT
Literature plays a very important part in the
civilization of men. It can mould the thoughts
of nations, guide their actions and mark their
lives with a powerful impress. Think of the effects of Voltaire's writings on the French. Dickens accomplished through literature what philanthropists failed to achieve in months of toil.
Such results may pertain also to the individual.
To many, books are inspiring friends and teachers. They are helping hands to the discouraged,
bringing hope and comfort to the

and yet
The team was not a
it may be termed the best team which Kentucky
has had in a number of years. It covets a number of outstanding victories while its losses were
all to powerful foes. In defeating Tennessee, a
traditionally strong enemy, the 'Cats accomplished that which their predecessors have been
attempting to do for a number of years. Too
much praise cannot be given for their work in
the season's finale.
In paying respect to the team itself we cannot
forget that driving force behind the team, that
hand at the throttle, that
Coach Wynne. In his short stay at the University, the "Chetter," as he is affectionately called
by his intimates, has endeared himself to the
student body and faculty through his frank,
amiable manner, and sincerity of purpose. Every
inch a gentleman, he has commanded the respect of the entire squad and the student body
"world-beate-r"

master-stratetigicia-

as a whole.
And so we pay

resjcct to the 1935 edition of
the Wildcats and their guiding genius. It is
our hope that their fighting spirit may set an
example for Wildcat teams in years to come.
WE ARE STANDING STILL

The modern man prides himself in believing
that the world is progressing morally. It is his
idea that science, education and democracy, in
the course of their greater development, are lifting civilization to a higher and higher moral
plane.
According to Reverend Reinhold Niebuhr of
the Union Theological Seminary, New York,
in an address at Symphony Hall last Sunday
forenoon, this "idea of progress is not valid."
He admits progress of man in small fields of activity only, and claims that moral progress,
which is really the summation of all progress,
is

t.

This idea of progress
sprouting up during the

is relatively

modern,
iieel immediately fol

n tinn m s

e

pce-pl-

cast-down-

s.

"Books are a guide to youth and an inspiration
for age."
In books we live in the greatest moments of
history and realize the deepest experience of
human lives. We sit down in our libarics and
meet the greatest minds o( the ages on equal
terms and feel at ease with them. We need not
feel ashamed of any personal weaknesses in their
presence; we have a relationship of thought with
them which ifJ undisturbed by external conditions. We broaden ourselves by mental contacts with them. We forget all our own limitations and thrill to the challenge of their attainments.

"Literature is the soul of action." The heroes
of antiquity are dead; their magnificent buildings arc ruins; their armies have long since
passed beyond existence; their cities and temples
are dust; yet they live in their magic existence
through books which make them as real to us as
the leaders of today. Books are the teachers of
men. They can well be classed as our companions, but good books seem to be as scarce as
gcxd companions so that we must exercise choice
in our selection of them.
We should choose our books as we do our
friends "for their sterling and intrinsic merit."
Some we can keep with us as companions always;
others should receive only a casual and occasional study. Some we should shun entirely;
some we should master by thorough and concentrated eirort; some are fit only for the fire.
We are often told that a man can be judged
by the friends he keeps. He can be judged more
closely by the books he reads. His associates
might be forced ujon him; books are read as a
result of his own choosing. They are an index
to his character and an influence on his actions.
The Coticordian.

don't get s'arted studying,
eating a hearty dinner, till
abnit ole'it or nine.
A