xt715d8nct7h https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt715d8nct7h/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19161019  newspapers sn89058402 English  This digital resource may be freely searched and displayed.  Permission must be received for subsequent distribution in print or electronically.  Physical rights are retained by the owning repository.  Copyright is retained in accordance with U. S. copyright laws.  For information about permissions to reproduce or publish, contact the Special Collections Research Center. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, October 19, 1916 text The Kentucky Kernel, October 19, 1916 1916 2012 true xt715d8nct7h section xt715d8nct7h THE KENTUCKY KERNEL
University of Kentucky
LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY, OCT. 19, 1916.

VOL IX

CHAPEL RALLY WILL
BE HELD TOMORROW STROLLER

GREAT ENTHUSIASM AT
IN ANNUAl

PULLFEST

Alumni Return to Renew Sophs Show True Sports
manship and All Go
Acquaintance With the
Pond

Thru

University

PATTERSON HONORED
President Emeritus Recipient of Ovation From
Audience
The Golden Jubilee, the University's
celebration of the completion of its
fifty years of life, was declared by
those who saw it last Saturday to be
the most unique event of its kind
ever held in the South and one that
was successful In every particular.
From the
the first event
of the program, thru the dance of Friday, the parade and the speeches and
the conferring of the degrees and the
burgoo Saturday morning, the dedication of Stoll Field and the football
game in the afternoon to the dances
evening,
of Saturday
everything
moved as smoothly as clock-worAlumni who had not been near the
University
since their graduation,
some of them for twenty years, were
In the city and vied in enthusiasm
with the baldheads and the Seniors
and their mustachios.
The principal exercises of the day
were held in the University chapel,
with President Emeritus James K.
Patterson and President Charles W.
Dabney, of the University of Cincinnati, making the principal addresses.
A crowd which filled the chapel witnessed the ceremonies and listened
.attentively to the speeches, while a
crowd far larger, disappointed in
their desire to get in, waited outside
on the campus.
r,

k

Perhaps the most striking feature
of the entire Jubilee was the tribute
paid by each speaker to Dr. Patterson,
and the ovation which was given him
when he arose to make his speech.
President Barker, who introduced him,
said: "'Because he has lived the life
of the University, we have selected
to make this speech Dr. James Kennedy Patterson, who will tell the history of the institution from its beginning until now." Dr. Patterson's
relation of the struggles and tribulations undergone by the University in
its early days was a classic both
from the standpoint of English diction and of history, and only lack of
ipace prevents The Kernel from printing this speech and the other excellent talks of the day in full.
In clear and simple phrases Dr.
Patterson told of the battle made to
put the State College on its feet and
the fight against the, denominational
colleges, which attempted to have the
Legislature take away its incomo, of
the growth of that incomo from
annually to $140,000 in 1910, the
last year of his incumbency, and of
the success of the graduates of the
$25,-00- 0

(Continued on Page Five)

FRESHIES

PARADE

which was
The annual
held at Clifton Pond last Friday after
noon resulted in a victory for the
by more
Freshmen,
outnumbered
men and hand!
than seventy-fiv- e
capped by having the worst side of
the pond, the sophs had no chance
and altho they fought hard, the fresh
ies had no trouble pulling them thru.
The contest was witnessed by several
thousand persons and moving pictures
of it were taken by the Universal Film
Company.
Less than thirty seconds after Cap
tain John Fairfax, who was referee,
had given the signal for the pullfest
to begin, the sophs were struggling in
They took their defeat
the water.
wun true sportsmanship
and every
one who pulled went thru the pond.
The Freshmen immediately formed
in line and paraded thru the streets,
stopping traffic, giving their class
yells and making themselves nuis
ances in general. As a grand finale
they all rushed thru the Ben All The
atre where they made their presence
known by giving their class yells and
making other unnecessary noise. As
a result of their victory the Freshmen
have the right to paint their numerals
wherever they desire and they will re
main unmolested.

Cheer Leader Haffler has announced

that a football rally will be held in
the chapel tomorrow morning that will
eclipse even that of last week, and
every student who can possibly be on
hand should be with the bunch. The
game Saturday will be one of the
hardest of the season and the enthus
lastic support of the entire rooting
section will be needed to pull it across.
Last Friday one of the alumni referred
to the fact that there were more girls
In the chapel than boys, and the cheer
leader wants to seo a larger proportion of deep voices tomorrow.
Plans will be announced at the ral
ly for a bonfire to be held tomorrow
evening on the campus. The old fence
has been burned already, but it is believed that material can be secured
for the blaze without tearing down any
of the University buildings.

or

TRY-OU-

TS

BE HELD NOV.

TO

SEWANEE WILL MEET

10

Prizes to Be Awarded Those Last Year's Tie Will Add
Making Best
to Fight on
Showing

In-tere- st

Stoll Field

"Amateur Night," under the direc- DOPE ON
GAME SCARCE
tion of the Strollers, the dramatic organization of the students, will be
Kentucky Expects to Reheld in the chapel on the evening of
deem Herself For Van-derb- ilt
Friday, November 10, instead of OcDefeat
tober 31, as was announced last week.
This program is held in order to give
(By Tom Underwood.)
students who are not Strollers an opPlace cards have been arranged for
portunity to demonstrate their dramatic ability. Prizes will be award the following for the "At Home" party
ed for the best acts and competition that will be given on Stoll lawn Saturis open to all students in the Univer day afternoon at 3 o'clock in honor of
a number of visitors from Sewanee,
sity with the exception of Strollers.
A prize of $5.00 will be awarded for Tennessee:
Kentucky.
Sewanee.
the best act put on by a single person,
and a similar prize of $5.00 will be Crutcher (Capt.) ... Edmonds (Capt.)
Left End.
awarded for the best act in which two
Perry
or more persons appear. Those who! Heick
Left Tackle-enter are allowed to present any act
Means
they desire, and originality is fre - ' Brittain
Left Guard.
quently considered
in giving the,
Clemmens or Dempsey
Bettle
prizes.
Center.
This is considered one of the most
Rucker
important events of the fall season in Simpson
Righ Guard.
University affairs and the chapel is
Mclsaacs
usually crowded to see the young ac- Murphree or Hickerson
Right Tackle.
tors make their initial appearances.
Clark
While appearance on the "Amateur Kinne
Right End.
Night" program is not the only prereAndrews
quisite for membership in the Stroll- Rodes
Quarterback.
ers, those who enter in the competiSellers
tion are usually received by the or- Grabfelder
Left Half.
ganization as members.
Herring
The Strollers each year present an Haydon
Right Half.
elaborately-stageproduction at the
Leftwitch
Opera House and all students who are Gumbert or Mcllvain
Fullback.
interested in dramatics should dem
Due to the fact that
onstrate their interest by entering the
Last news of the Sewanee game Is veiled
"Amateur Night" competition.
year two of the members of the cast under a cloak of censorship, The Kerof "Father and the Boys," which was nel readers will have to hold their
the annual Stroller play, were Fresh horses and be satisfied with what Miss
men who came into the organization Margaret McLaughlin would call a
by the "Amateur Night" route only "wooden" story. Whether the fact
last fall. The Strollers are glad to that there are no "bear tales" issuing
include in their membership all stu- from the mountain is a good sign or
dents who take an interest in and are bad, remains to be seen.
Dr. Tigert is more mum than usual.
capable in dramatics, and they hope
that a large number will try out for He has not given out any stories about
probable changes in the line-uand it
the Amateur Night prizes.
All who desire to enter should see is understood that the Wildcats will
the stage manager, John R. Marsh, at appear in their customary way. Clemonce and give him their names. Names mens and Gumbert, who received inmay be turned into any of the other juries in the Vanderbilt cyclone, aro
officers or members of the organiza- O. K. and ready for business.
tion and this should be attended to at
Drifts From The Mountain.
once. As the time is short it would
Although discussion of Sowaneo
be well for all contestants to begin and the way the Tigers look, is mostwork on their acts immediately in or- ly a guessing affair, there is a little
der to have them perfectly rehearsed. dope out. Sowaneo outweighs Ken.

BATTLE DIES IN EAST

Maior W. C. McFarland
Was Former Command
ant at University

Major William C. McFarland, one of
the heroes of the charge on San Juan
war, and
Hill in the
at one time commandant at the Uni
versity of Kentucky, died early in September in New York, and was buried
with military honors at West Point.
For many years he had suffered from
injuries he received during the war,
and these Injuries caused his death.
His wife, who was Miss Annie Land- CHEMICAL SOCIETY
ram, of Lancaster, Kentucky, died a
MEETS AT STATION few years ago. He is survived by one
son, Dr. Landram McFarland, of New
The first meeting of the year of the
York City.
Lexington section of the American
John A. Wyeth, writing in the New
Chemical Society was held Thursday,
pays elo
October 12th, at the Experiment Sta- York Sun of recent date,
quent tribute to Major McFarland.
tion, and a report of the
Mr. Wyeth is of the opinion that had
convention of the American Chemical
Society was read by Dr. F. E. Tuttle it not been for Major McFarland's
bravery, the result of
and also a report of the second an headwork and
the battle of Santiago might havo
nual Exposition of Chemical Indus
tries by William Rodes, both of whom been different.
Major (then Captain) McFarland
were present at the meetings in New
commanded E Company of the Six
York.
He
Dr. Tuttle's report was mainly con teenth United States Infantry.
cerned with the business proceedings became separated from his command
of the national convention and dis- ing officer before the battle of Sancussed the various steps of chemical tiago, and seeing nothing left to do,
advancement in the past few months, he charged the trenches of the Spanwhile Mr. Rodes gave an interesting iards. The captains of the companies
account of the great strides that have on either Bide of him seeing the ad"Follow E Combeen made in the chemical industries vance, shouted:
of the United States in the last year. pany," and with this the entire line
This development was shown by 200 swept forward, being led by McFarexhibits at the exposition, wherein land. The charge was successful, but
was emphasized the fact that the Captain McFarland fell within a few
United States has done in two years, feet of the trendies, hit in the back
chemically, what Germany accom- of the head by a fragment of shrapuel
from one of his own guns a few miles
plished in forty years.
R. C. Dabnoy made an interesting in the rear.
should bo
Mr. Wyeth says there
illustrated talk on the "Chemistry of
chiselled on his gravestone at West
Dread Making."
The next meeting will be held No Point, where ho is uried, the follow"Here rests the real
vember 8th, at which time the annual ing inscription:
hero of the battle of Santiago."
of officers will take place.
election
semi-annu-

No. 5

Spanish-America-

n

d

sure-enoug- h

p

UNIVERSITY BULLETIN
MAKES APPEARANCE
The first Issue of the University
bulletin this year mndo its appearance last week. Miss Eliza Piggott
and Frederick M. Jackson aro the editors. Tlio bulletin, which contains a
gist of all the important meetings, social affairs and the like, is issued
weekly and is posted in conspicuous
places on tho campus.

tucky by about six or eight pounds to
tho man. Eleven old men have returned to the Mountain. Of courso,
some guy will think this means tho
No.
whole Tiger team
Dearie, you guessed wrong. Two of
the returned veterans wore subs. Hut
even at that the team will not bo what
you could well call green. Two now
backfleld men aro in tho bunch.
There Is ono thing that Kentucky
funs can smilo about. It is that those

* Page

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL.

2

Go Where the Go's Go

Personally Picked

MEET ME AT

Triangle, Metro, World nnd V. L. S. E.
Feature Pictures.

THE ORPHEUM THEATRE
J. H. STAMPER, Jr., Owner and Manager

First Class in Every Appointment

Admission 5c and 10c
OPEN 10:00 A. M. TO

11 KM)

P. M.

created a great deal of Interest nnd
tho hopo wns expressed that tho "real"
dlplomnB would not bo so hard to carAdmission
tho
BIG PARADE ry or so hard to acqulro as hnd
IN
Ten
PRIZE
fake ones.
Cents
Change of Picture Eacb Day
Tho various classes spent much
Novel Ideas hard work and monoy In arranging
Original and
their sections for tho parado and tho
Presented By Each
school spirit shown was truly gratifyof Classes
ing, tho no doubt class spirit was
Undergraduates of tho University of higher because each class wanted tho
Kentucky, more than 700 in number $100.00.
nnd representing tho four classes, in
olaborato costumes parnded thru the
First Dude "I have tewiblo news;
streets of Lexington last Saturday in Charles Is dead."
tho most original and uniquo pageant
Same Management, Same Classy Shows
Second Dude "Howiblo! How did
ever seen here.
ho die?"
"If a Laugh was worth $1, You'd Leave Here Rich"
The Juniors won the $100 cash prize,
First Dude "His cane fell on him."
offered for numbers, originality of idea The Case Tech.
Prices 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, Boxes
Tho
carried out and for "make-up.award was made by the special comtwo tackles who raised bo muchi
mittee composed of Charlie Straus,
LOST
chairman; J. D. Turner and Frank
trouble last year got their diplomas. STUDENTS' HATS
The Juniors followed the
Battaile.
Just who will appear at the tackles is
pageant idea thruout, illustrating the
as uncertain as an examination on
AT WAREHOUSE DANCE
physiology or how long a Y. M. C. A.
changes and happenings of the Univermeeting will last. The two that apsity's fifty years.
pear in the probable line-uthat
The Freshmen, who marched im
Exclaimed a young fellow
In Check Room mediately after Weber's Band, were
heads this aforesaid "wooden" story, Trouble
purchasing one of our suits.
s
of
When Foot-Shake- rs
were chopped out of some
dressed as children, and the dainty
Sewanee's previous appearances this
He was right. Each garment
misses looked even prettier and
Rush For Lids
year. Dr. Tigert has wired to the
younger than they do in their everyScoring big with must come up with the re
citadel in the hills of Tenday school attire, which is going
College Men, Come in
quired number of College cred
of the team and SUIT
nessee, for the line-uIS THREATENED some! They had toys, bundles or
and let us show them its to get in here.
t
stick of
books and the
their weights, but has not received an
to you.
sucker." The Freshcandy or "all-daanswer.
During the exercises in connection men undoubtedly
made some "hit"
for KerUp to the time the dead-linNew Styles, New Colors,
nel copy went on, the officials had not with the University's Golden Jubilee with the crowds, but the judges
New Belted Backs, Double
last Saturday a number of
thought that they looked too young
been announced.
students were seen wearing hats that and innocent to be given $100 all for
and Single Breasted Styles.
A Battle Royal.
were not of exactly the same size and their own.
115 EAST MAIN STREET
The game will be more exciting shape as
their respective heads, and The Sophomores came next, headed LEXINGTON.
KENTUCKY.
New College Men's
than the first fuss between "two minds a great deal of speculation was in
by several boys and girls dressed in
un
with but a single thought" and as
boys pre
dulged in as to why our
true cowboy style. They had a large
certain as betting on maiden two- ferred head coverings that either con number of clowns in automobiles and
.
From the cragged peak of
cealed their ears or refused to do out and several "freak exhibits." "The
Sewanee, a ferocious den of tigers,
more than nerch nrecariously a la Making of a Battalion" was the best
You've tried the rest
hungering for fight and licking their
Happy Hooligan on the upper rims of stunt they pulled. It was original and
Now try the "BEST"
lips at the thought of prey, will come.
those heads. The Kernel has learned clever and caused many laughs as
In the arena they will match the Wild
the deep, deep secret of the misfits. they passed along Main Street.
That rank right along with
MRS. BARNETT
cats of Kentucky, the "flghtingest" an
Those strange chapeaux were not
the suits.
next and presentThe Juniors came
imals on earth. The old Romans as
intentionally worn; they were not a ed
unique ideas a pageant or review
in
they crowded on the cold stone seats
part of the oddities of costume in of the happenings of the past fifty
s
in Nero's time and chewed the
favor during the parade. Everybody years, which helped to recall the good
of their tocas and gave nine
wore somebody's else hat because he old days to the visiting Alumni. They Metropolitan
"Habets" for their champions, had
did not know who had his own. The succeeded beyond their expectations,
nothing on the Kentucky crowd. Both
Incorporated.
occurred at a dance
general mix-u'
The Place for Good Things to Eat
for as the fifty years of University
love to see a fight.
"COLLEGE FELLOWS' SHOP'
Ware
given at the Shelburne Tobacco
life passed in review on Main Street
Sewanee is rather desirous of doing
house Friday evening. Guy Huguelett Saturday morning, the crowds cheered
more than breaking even with the
and Prentice Slade, former students hfifirtllv.
The Juniors were divided
Wildcats this year. Kentucky also a
at the University, were promoters of into five divisions, each division rep
"come-backstunt to pull. Both will
the dance, and as a matter of "accom resenting the happenings of ten years.
fiKht as they never fought before.
INCORPORATED
modation" they had provided a check The first of the Junior line was com
Come out and watch the fun.
room where hats could be cared for at posed of boys dressed in the style of
Phoenix Hotel Lobby
twenty-fivcents per. The dance was
the eighties and representing the stua very enjoyable affair, and every- dents of those early days. A carriage
ADA MEADE HAS GOOD thing went smoothly till sometime bewah" dayB, containing a
of "befo
PROGRAMS IN STORE fore daybreak, when all the male beauty of de Junior class in becoming
the
CITY DATES 25c
DAY AND NIGHT SERVICE
dancers decided at once that they dress of that period and with a real
chilwas
A glance at the list of features wanted to go home, and as it
darky driving, caused quite a bit of
coming to the Ada Meade during the ly outside they wanted head coverings. applause as also did the "Immortals
They went after them. The check- of '98," whose path was strewn with
next few weeks looks like the middle
page from "Who's Who in Vaudeville." room attendants, when they saw 150 flowers by a crowd of dainty flower
bearing down girls. "A Cop's Welcome to tho CamOn Monday, Nainea, the past mas or more husky youths
ter of Hawaiian music, brings his uko- - on them, incontinently deserted their pus," "Cannon Law," the "Death of
could Willis B. Smith," "Jack Dicker" and
lele. The Juvenile Six with a clean- posts and everybody that
grabbed a hat. Some must have taken "George Washington's
Annual (?)
up musical song and dance hit, and
Ask any "State" Man who wears Justright Tailored to
went with Turkey" were some of the other
Order Clothes and he will tell you that he would not
Jerome Jackson and Jane Barber, sure two, for some others who
r
kind as
anything but uniquo remindors to tho Alumni of
think of going back to the
fire comedy successes, start things off. one camo back without
long as we are In business. Our new Fall Patterns
scratches received in the melee. Now, things well known to us. Last but not
Come and look
your inspection.
are ready for
Thursday brings "The Fascinating
We guarantee perfect satisfaction.
them over.
appears, Huguelett and Slade are least camo tho Juniors tribute to "Tho
Flirts," a corking "girl act" that's it
bad, too, as those who lost their Grand Old Man," Dr. Patterson, who
bright and snappy. Routan's Song in
hats are threatening suit to recover was represented in a president's chair,
TO
Birds and Blllsbury and Robinson, two
SUITS AND OVERCOATS
damages.
carried by several boys dressed as
clever girls from musical comedy.
"Trustees."
Following in quick succession thru
The Seniors were encased by huge
November are Dave Roth, Harlan LOST A Louisville Girls' High School
1915. Please return paper "Diplomas" on which was paintclass ring, class
Knieht and Comnany. "The Devil's
Lexington, Ky.
St,
145
to Mary Grundy, Patterson Hall, and ed their respective "degrees" and a
Revue." "The Niuht Clerk." and "The
one inside. They
caricature of the
receive reward.
Maid of the Movies."

BEN

All

Feature and Comedy
Pictures

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THEATRE

cDA MEADE
'Superior Vaudeville"
ALL NEW BUT THE NAME

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United GJstflfri

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Hats, Shoes, Shirts,
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University Lunch Stand

coat-tail-

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* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL

Page

his punting averages and tills method good

WILDCATS

"WAITE"

DEFEAT

GO

Grass Rugs For
!

BEFORE

TO wns booh discarded as bad business. not nblo to gain much but ho made up
Straight football was next Introduc- for it on tho defense Ho stopped
VAHDY ed and tho KentucKy lino was no Hayes onco when ho was headed for a

45 to 0 Tells the Sad, Sad
Story of a Good

Game Fight

The Student's

DOC AND CURRY STAR

Room
The student usually wants his room to look nlco, yet ho docs not
caro to spend a great deal for It. Wo have solved tho problem on
floor covering In a "Waitos" Grass Hug. Walto Rugs are very attractive in coloring and very durable Wo show a completo assortment
of sizes In all tho colorings. Not expensive but very Mtltfactory.

A. F. Wheeler Furniture Company
LEXINGTON,

COR. SHORT AND LIMESTONE

KY.

Don't Neglect
Your Eyes
Your Eyes are Strained

20 PER CENT. DISCOUNT OFFERED
To Students of State University on Every pair of Glasses Fitted and Made
We Make Them Any Style
Here. Duplicated Lenses Included.
You Desire and Charge Only the Standard Pric

A Thorough EYE EXAMINATION Included
C. F. THATCHER
UflTinC' Past two years located
NUIIUti

OPTOMETRIST AND OPTICIAN

at Short and Lime
NOW IN
BANK BUILDING
CITY

Commodore Forwards Too
Big and Fast For Kentucky Linemen

mntch for the Vnndy bulls. Tho
backs made stoady gains thru
tho holes opened up by tho
battering rams In front of them nnd
thereby suspends a narrative.
How Scores Were Made.
There scorns to be some question
about who mndo
tho touchdowns.
Presley T. Atkins, managing editor of
Tho Lexington Hornld, Jack Sallcc, of
,
generally considtho
ered tho best sporting writer in Kentucky, and John Ilond, of Tho Louisville Herald, and a Loader reporter,
were all mixed up on who made the
touchdowns and In the Sunday morning papers no one of tho four had tho
same men making the touchdowns. It
appears that "Rabbit" Curry, tho Texas marvel, mad6 three scores. Ho
hopped thru tho line In a fearful way
and left a lasting impression on Kentucky minds. "Red" Floyd, tho star
backfleld man and open field runner
certainly went around right end for
another. Richardson, who took Tom
Zerfoss's place, made one on a cross- buck run. Whether Norman, Floyd or
Richardson made the other seems
where the trouble comes. At any
rate there were an even half a dozen
touchdowns made.
"Doc" Versus "Rabbit."
Curry or Rodes? This is the question. The "Rabbit" Is certainly the
greatest open field runner ever seen
anywhere. He dances thru the" field
like a Mercury on winged feet. He is
a graceful football player and his "every little movement has a meaning all
its own." His most wonderful run
was when he caught a punt on tho
line and shot thru the field for a
touchdown with absolutely no interference.
But "Doc" with an entirely different
style of play is just as great as Curry
will ever be. He predominates in
every scene. Standing at the pilot's
place he points his finger at the line
to get them set right. Deliberately he
calls his signals with a powerful voice.
He drives tho team down the field as
no other man can drive them. One
cannot forget in making comparisons
that "Doc" had little interference and
tho lino was not able to hold. He
made only one spectacular open field
run, but his dives and plunges netted
steady gains. His punting nearly
equaled Zerfoss's.
Haydon and Brittain.
Brittain and Haydon were the other
stars. Their work was remarkable.
Haydon crawled around on the ground
and hopped thru the lino as an ape
hops thru the Upmost tops of tho banana trees of his native forest. He
made spectacular gains. Brittain was
a bear. He fought hard and his fighting counted. Ho broko thru tho lino
and threw Curry for his only losses.
Ho came across with the goods.
and Grabfelder played
Crutcher

First and City Bank Bids., Main and Chcaptide
Room 202

Courier-Journal-

Vanderbllt has conic nnd gone nnd
tho "true collegians" of tho University
who had planned to give vent to their
jubihoped-fo- r
Joy with a
lee celebration Saturday night, had to
bo satisfied with drowning their sor
row. Tho story of Vandy'a visit is a
Bad, sad one, and is told with a tear
not of shame but of sorrow. Tho
scoro does not spell ignominious
speedy-gdefeat. The
ing Commodores know when they left
that they had been in a football game
and had been playing a football team.
Thoy had no Jokes to erack about
their triumph over the Wildcats.
"Why did we lose?" somebody still
asks, now and then. The answer is as
easy as cutting Freshman hair. Van
derbilt's linemen looked like a bunch
of Hippopotami or Hippopotamusses,
as the case may be, and charged like
raging bulls. Their backfleld men were
as fast as any ordinary Derby candi
date and each one dodged like a fry- chicken when you get him
up against a back-yarfence.
The AVildcats wildcatted In the old
time fighting way. There was no
flinching or fouling and they battled
like true sons of the Dark and Bloody
Ground. The University of Kentucky,
looking back upon fifty years of life
as an institution, was proud of her
representatives.
The Blue and White
was never upheld more bravely or
fought for any harder. The line, out
weighed over fifteen pounds to the
man, did all it could against the Commodore catapults. The tacklers dove
desperately at the legs of tho runners
and the backfleld men knew no fear,
Among Those Present.
Before the burgoo and barbecue had
well settled down for tho afternoon'
the multitudes began to pour in. The
crowd was generally estimated at
5,000, altho anybody could guess ten
thousand and get away with it just as
well. In the concrete visitor's box sat
the Governor of Kentucky and his
handsome wife. President Henry S.
Barker, Kentucky's most enthusiastic
rooter, was also in the box. In tho
big blue sweater that had Just been
presented him as a token of the regard of tho student body of the University, sat Richard C. Stoll, familiarly called "Dick," tho former
hero and present active alumnus
of the school, to whom tho field had
just been dedicated.
Over on tho Vanderbllt side was a
big bunch of "Cuckoos." Thero is a
persisent rumor that they "Cuckooed"
quite loudly when Kentucky got her
hard knocks. It is tho same "brotherly love" that has prevailed so many
years between tho two schools.
The Recital of Wrongs.
Vandorbllt opened up with a punting game. Tom Zorfoss, former Kentucky man, was doing tho
for tho Commodores. His steady kicking made tho fanatics bollove that the
sport oxperts who herald him as the
greatest punter In tho South aro not
just working their jaws to glvo them
exorcise. Hut "Doc" Rodes, who was
doing the kicking for tho Wildcats,
was only a few feet behind Zerfoss in
sure-enoug-

hard-hittin-

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Tickets on Sale for Use only on SATURDAY, OCTOBER 28. Good
turning to Reach Lexington, Prior to Midnight, October 31, 1916.

Re-

CITY TICKET OFFICE, 118 East Main Street. Phone 49.
DEPOT TICKET OFFICE, Q. & C. ROUTE DEPOT.

H C. KING, Passenger & Ticket Agent, Lexington, Ky.

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OFFERS TO THE COLLEGE YOUNG MEN

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Grabby was

DOWN

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grid-Iro-

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Boys, the F.

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touchdown. Grabby leapt from behind
like a tiger around his neck and pulled
him down. Crutcher was steady thru
tho game.
Tho man whom tho defeat hurt
worse than anybody clso and who had
done more than anybody else was not
seen on tho gridiron. Ho was down
on tho players' bench crossing and uncrossing his elongated logs. Ho had
planned tho game. Ho had worked
and hoped and feared. Ho had tossed
t
by night and labored by
and
day. Ho was a game loser and Blmply
said tho best team won. Dr. TIgert
is a great coach and tho power of tho
team is all his workmanship.
Clemmons, who hnd played a peach
of a game at center had to leave on
account of an Injured ankle.
Tho
veteran Dempscy went in and played
n splendid game.
Gumbort had to
leave on account of a damaged
shoulder. Mcllvain took his place.
Both played well. Alvin Thompson, a
new man, appeared in the regular lineup and did excellent work.
half-slep-

FOOTBALL TALK.
Carmen, the big guard for Vanderbllt, who snapped a bone in the game
here Saturday, may be absent from
the gridiron all the rest of the year on
account of the Injury.
crowd outThe Kentucky "Rah-Rahat the Vanderbllt
did themselves
game. They never said die and the
snake dance eclipsed any before witnessed.
Georgetown outplayed Cincinnati in
every department of the game and
game. Georgetown is
won a
reputed to have a team that will be
heard from.
Centre College and the University
of Louisville battled Saturday in a
scoreless tie. It was the second consecutive year the two colleges had
played 0 to 0 games.
Lexington High School and Louisville High School also played a scoreless tie.
"

GET YOUR OWN

PAPER.
The Kernel wishes to request
every student to go to the University postoffice on Thursday morning after 11 o'clock and get his own
copy of the paper. No one is expected or allowed to take more
than one copy, as there is only ono
for each student, and when more
than one is taken some one else is
deprived of his. The management
regrets that it is necessary to make
this request, but some persons have
been taking moro than their share
of tho good news and tho custom
will have to bo stopped.

the only store selling the

University
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Just the shoe you need, especially constructed ol the best grade of
Krom Tan Leather with Goodyear Welted Viscolizrd soles on a
Price, $4.50
comfortable English last

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ordinary clothes.
Won't You Come in and Look?

Kaufman Clothing Co.

3

Fine new Dress Shoes of all leathers in Tan orBlack
on the newest lasts, prices from - $2.50 to $5.00
Evening

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* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL

Page 4

The Kentucky Kernel
Published every Thursday throughout the College year by the student body of
the University of Kentucky, for the benefit of the students,
alumni and faculty of the institution.
THE KENTUCKY KERNEL is the official newspaper of the University.
It is issued with the view of furnishing to Its subscribers nil the collcgo news
of Kentucky, together with n digest of items of interest concerning the universiti