xt718911pf4d https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt718911pf4d/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19331024  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, October 24, 1933 text The Kentucky Kernel, October 24, 1933 1933 2013 true xt718911pf4d section xt718911pf4d L
TUESDAY
SEMI-WEEKL-

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL

EDITION;;
KERNEL

Y

S-

-

UNIVERSITY

OF

EDUCATION BODY
WILL HOLD MEET

AT UK THIS WEEK
Conference Will Cooperate
With Similar Assembly
In Frankfort
DATES FOR SESSION
ARE OCTOBER 27, 28

President McVey to Preside
Over Banquet and
Addresses

Complete plans and programs for
the Tenth Annual Educational conference to be held Friday and Saturday, at Memorial hall, were issued
today by the College of Education.
This conference will be held In
cooperation with a similar meeting
of the Department of Superintendence of the Kentucky Education
association In Frankfort, Thursday
and part of Friday. The first session at the University will convene
Friday afternoon, when speeches
will be made by James H. Richmond, superintendent of public instruction; D. Y. Dunn, superintendent of Fayette County schools;
James A. Camack, Jr., secretary of
the Kentucky Educational commission; Dr. H. L. Donovan, president
of Eastern State Teachers college,
and Dr. R. A. Kent, president of
the University of Louisville.
Friday evening, a banquet will be
held at the Lafayette hotel, with
president Dr. Frank L. McVey presiding. Two addresses, "The Work
of the Commission from a Layman's
Point of View," by Yancey Altshel-e- r,
Louisville, and "The Commission
and Kentucky's Education Program," by Doctor Richmond, will be
made. The University men's glee
club will render several numbers.
President McVey will also preside
at the final session Saturday morning, when speeches will be given by
Dr. H. H. Hill, superintendent of
Lexington City schools; Dr. J. W.
Martin, College of Commerce, University; Mr. J. W. Brooker, director
division of School Buildings and
Grounds, Frankfort; and. Doctor
Richmond.
The banquet Friday evening will
be open to all students who wish
to attend, as will all sessions of the
conference.
Students may make
reservations for the banquet by
College of Education or
phoning the
' the Extension department.
.

KENTUCKIAN

DEANS DEMAND
COOPERATION OF

PICTURES

'Kentuckian photographs for
the 1S34 annual may be made
any day this week from 9
a. m. until S p. m., at the
Lafayette studios, on the corner of Main and Mill street
For all students who have
had pictures made but who
have failed to return the
proofs, a proof will be selected to be used In the annual.

DRAMATIC CIRCLE
Faculty Advisor Must Exercise More Authority Over
Organization
STROLLER PRESIDENT
DENIES FALSE RUMOR

SCIENCE GROUP
TO MEET HERE
Kentucky Academy of Social
Science Will Convene
In U.K. Commons

Friday Noon

MARTIN

TO

PRESIDE

The annual meeting of the Kentucky Academy of Social Sciences
will be held at noon Friday in the
University Commons.
It will be
open to all persons Interested in
social sciences. The meeting will
be presided over by Prof. James W.
Martin, director of the University
bureau of business research and
president of the academy. Officers
for 1933-3- 4 will be elected.
Mr. Ben Kilore, Louisville, executive secretary of the Kentucky Farm
Bureau federation, will be the principal speaker. His subject will be
"A Rational Program of Legislation

for the

1934

Kentucky General

As-

sembly." The question of establishing a journal of opinion In Kentucky will be considered at the
meeting.
Other officers are R. V. Terrill,
Morehead State Teachers college,
Prof. J. B. Shannon,
Transylvania college, secretary-treasure- r;
Prof. W. J. Moore, Eastern State Teachers college, Richmond, and Dr. Charles J. Turck,
president of Centre college, Danville, members of the executive
committee.
The academy was founded about
10 years ago.
College men in the
fields of political science, psychology, history, economics, and sociology are eligible for membership.
At present all colleges In the state
are represented. Members are asked to write articles on subjects in
their fields which are published In
newspapers.

Democratic Club
WAA EXECUTIVES
To Be Organized

ARE ANNOUNCED

young men's demo-

cratic club Is being organied on the
.campus under the direction of the
Fayette county Democratic committee, it was announced Monday
by Mr. E. Reed Wilson, chairman of
the committee. The campus committee appointed by Rr. Reed includes Joe Relster, Douglas Any,
drews, Gorden Lisanby, Phil
"Dutch" Kreuter, Roscoe Stephens, Jack Mohney, and Landon
Ar-der-

Cox.
All men

students interested in the
organization are asked to attend
meeting, the date of which
the first

will be announced soon. A speaker
will be furnished by the Fayette
committee,
and the
Democratic
meeting Is to be in the form of a
smoker. Arrangements for the club
are being made entirely by the Fayette county club through the campus committee, headed by Joe Relster and Douglas Andrews.

Women students who wish to Join
the Y.W.C.A. and who were not
during the membership
reached
campaign, are asked to come to
the Y.W. office in the Women's
building and see Augusta Roberts.
Oflice hours are 9:30 a. m. to 12
noon, and 2 to 4 p. m.

The faculty of the College of Law
will hold a luncheon in the University Commons Wednesday at 12:20.

In

Statement

More authority must be exercised
by the faculty advisor of Strollers,
In order for the dramatic organization to function under the approval
of Deans Sarah Blanding and T. T.
Jones, was the decision reached at
a meeting of the Stroller officers
and the deans on October 18, In
Miss Blandlng's office.
"The Strollers have been Instructed to map out their plans for this
year end present them for approval
to the deans of the University. If
the Strollers are to continue to go
on as in the past, they must have
a competent faculty advisor. The
deans are willing to back the Strollers, If they are willing to cooperate
with the deans and put forth the
proper effort," said Dean Blanding
to a Kernel reporter yesterday.
In an interview with James
Fahey, president of Strollers, who
took over the office recently after
the resignation of H. S. Holllngs-wort- h,
Fahey expressed the intention of coming to terms with the
deans In behalf of Strollers, and
that he had no Intention of disbanding the organization.
"I feel
sure from my discussion with Dean

Jones that a plan satisfactory to
both organization and administrative officials of the University can
be worked out that will allow a
continuation of the organization as
an undergraduate dramatic circle,"
was the new president's statement.
When he was asked if the Dramatic
circle had any idea of disbanding,

his reply was:
"Any rumor to the fact that the
Strollers are considering the breaking up of that organization is absolutely false, and out of the question. Strollers have never entertained such an idea, since I have
been in the organization. The organization intends to continue as in
the past, with a wider scope of activities; we also Intend to make this
year's productions the best in its
history."

TAG DAYS NAMED

Governing Body Will
Hold First Meeting at 3
HONOR FRATS
p. m. Wednesday in Women's Building
Members of Mortar Board,
O.D.K. to Sponsor Drive
Final selection of members and
for Procuring Funds for
advisors of the executive council of
the Woman's Athletic association
Student Union Building
New

BY

was announced at a meeting of the
organization Friday. The first meeting of the new council will be held
at 3 p. m. Wednesday in the
Women's building.
The officers, together with the
advisors and the new appointees,
form the governing body of the organization.
Advisors selected were Miss Rebecca Averill, Dean Sarah Bland-inMrs. P. K. Holmes, and Mrs.
James Server.
Student members of the council
g,

and the sports they represent are:

Helen Fry, basketball; Mary Lou
Hume, hockey; Margaret Warren,
archery; Marjorle Powell, natural
dancing; Dorothy Whit worth, tumbling; Polly Kesheimer, baseball;
Sarah Whittinghill, tennis; Lucy
Jean Anderson, horseback riding;
Sarah Purnell, hiking and camping.
was selected
Freeberg
Virginia
chairman of publfcity and Catherine Calloway was named social

Kampus
Kernels

Group Intends To Function
As In Past, Fahey Asserts

chairman.

Arrangements
for
sponsored annually by
ization will be made at
Wednesday. November
set as the date and a
been sent to the office
of men for that date.

the dance
the organthe meeting
4 has been
petition has
of the dean

Omicron Delta Kappa and Mortar
Board are sponsoring Tag Days on
October 26, 27, 28 as part of the
Student Union Building fund drive.
These tags will be sold by the members of both organizations for five
cents each.
A benefit dance will be given after
the V. M. I. game on November 11,
The proceeds
in the gymnasium.
of the dance will go to the building
following fraternfund also. The
ities and sororities have pledged $1
out of each initiation fee: Delta
Tau Delta, Alpha Sigma Phi, Alpha
Gamma Rho, Pi Kappa Alpha, Phi
Kappa Tau, SiRma Alpha Epsilon,
Alpha Gamma Delta, Zeta Tau Alpha. Kappa Delta, and Kappa
Kappa Gamma.
Mortar Board and Omicron Delta Kappa will hold a Joint meeting
at 6 p. m. Thursday to discuss further plans for the building fund.
Presidents of the organizations are
Gordon Burns and Lois Robinson.

Women's Honorary
To Sponsor Dance
Mortar Board "Dutch" Dance
To Be Held November 3
In Patterson Hall

Home Ec Fraternity
Begins Annual Work

Mortar Board,

senior women's
group will sponsor a
Phi Upsilon Omlcron, national Dutch dance from3 4 to 6 p. m.
Strollers will meet at 4:45 p. m.,
in Patterson
Wednesday, October 26, in White professional home economics fra- Friday, November
ternity, held its regular meeting recreation hall.
hall.
Each year Mortar Board sponsors
last night at the Agricultural building. After a short business meet- a tea dance. This dance is to take
All DeMolays and alumni
the place of the "leap year" dance
who are prospective mem- ing the members sewed on Christwhich was held last year. Charbers of the honorary DeMolay fra- mas toys.
Refreshments of tea and wafers acteristic of a Dutch dance, both
ternity now being formed on the
Faculty members men and women can go "stag" and
University campus, will meet at were served.
4:30 p. m. in room 111, McVey hall. present were Dr. Statie Erlckson, both can "break."
Final arrangements will be made
Sylvester Ford, president pro tern, Misses Marie Barkley, Maye Hoover, Ronella Spickard, and Kather-in- e and committees will be appointed
will preside.
at a meeting of the organization to
Rogers.
Active members of the chapter be held today at 3 p. m. in the
A reorganization meeting of the
Oerman club will be held tomorrow are Sarah Van Arsdall, president; Women's building.
at 4 p. m. in room 207, Administra- Mrs. O. J. Jones,
DK. PINNEY TO SPEAK
tion building. All students who are Rosemary Ethlngton, secretary;
Interested in the German club are Faye Allen, treasurer; Polly KesheiDr. O. H. Pinney, of the Univerurged to attend this first meeting mer, editor; Pat Johnson, historian-librariaOdeyn Gill, Mary Helzer, sity dispensary, will speak at the
of the semester.
"
Sarah Whittinghill, Ann Irvine, Dutch Lunch club, Friday, October
Alma Magna Mater club will hold Dorothea Wilford, Katherlne Cul-to- 27. Dr. Pinney was a missionary to
Africa for ten years previous to
Dorothy Prows.
Its first meeting of the year at 5
coming to the University, and Will
p. m. Wednesday. October 25, at
talk on his experiences and travels
CANDY SALE IS PLANNED
Maxwell Place. The members of
in Africa.
last year' club will meet at 4 p. m.
All town girls and commuters
arrive.
Freshmen girls of the home ecobefore the new members
After a short business meeting, nomics department will hold a can- who are Interested In hearing Dr.
at
the club will adjourn to have tea dy sale at the Agricultural build- 9 Pinney and who were not club the
are
last meeting of the Dutch
ing Thursday, October 26, from
with Mrs. Frank L. McVey.
a. m. until 1p.m. They are doing asked to call or see Augusta RobThe Woman'! Self Government this work for credit toward becom- ert in the Y.W.C.A. office In the
by Thursday
association is Inviting all women ing member of the the Home Eco- Women's building
noon.
nomics club.
(Continued on Page Four)
honorary

ys

n;

n,

IIUil I I 111 Ml It Jl Jo
WILL BE GIVEN
J

NEW SERIES NO. 12

Senior President

BROADBENTIIEAD
OF CLASS FOR '34

For Kyian Hop;

AW

Nighthawks

v

V

(

PRESIDENT WILL BE
COUNCIL MEMBER

Final plans for the Kentuckian
dance, which will be held in the
Alumni gym. Saturday, October 28,
from 9 until 12 p. m., were Issued
today by George Vogel, editor of
the yearbook.
and
There will be six

:

.!- -'

Elections Soon

Officers of the senior class who
were elected at a special senior
election held Friday are Smith
Broadbent, president; Ann Jones,
Nicholls,
William
secretary; and Eugene Cowley,

treasurer.

The president of the senior class
automatically became an
member of the Men's Student council and likewise
member of the
Board of Student Publications.
Election of officers of the other
classes will be arranged for at
meeting of the Student council, 4
p. m. Wednesday, in the office of
the dean of men.
The election was held from 9
until 4:30 p. m. Friday, in White

hall. Votes were counted by members of the Student council immediately after the election In the
office of the dean of men.
Smith Broadbent, Cadiz, is registered In the College of Agriculture,
Is a member of Alpha Gamma Rho
fraternity, and belongs to Omicron
Delta Kappa, Scabbard and Blade,
Lamp and Cross, Strollers, the
council, Block and
Bridle, and was a member of the
1932-3- 3
Student council, and played
baseball In 1931.
Ann Jones, Lexington, is registered in the College of Arts and Sciences, and is majoring in psychology.
She is a member of Alpha
Gamma Delta sorority, a member
of Phi Beta, Eta Sigma Phi, and
was a member of Cwens during her
sophomore year. She is the daughter of Dean T. T. Jones.
William Nicholls, Lexington, registered in the College of Arts and
Sciences, during his college career
has been a member of the University band and also a member of
He
the Philharmonic orchestra.
sings in the Glee club and is a
member of Alma Magna Mater, and
of Alpha Phi Omega. Last year
Nicholls composed the University
pep song "Kentucky, Fight Fight."
Eugene Cowley, College of Engineering, is a member of Tau Beta
Pi, was a member 6f the freshman
track team. He was appointed a
member of the Men's Student council for this year.

KENTUCKY DEANS
CONVENE SUNDAY

i

vJ
SMITH D. BROADBENT

ALUMNUS WINS
'32 NOBEL PRIZE
Thomas Hunt Morgan, Class
Of 1886, Receives Honor
For Research Work
In Medicine
AWARD WORTH $46,000

MUSIC COLLEGE
PLANS CONCERT

Y. W. WILL HAVE

GROUP MEETINGS

;

be-b-

7- -0

COUNT

Big Blue Is Conspicuous by
Lack of Coordinate Play
And Blocking
W. & L. MAKES 91 YARD

Better Form Is Expected for
Annual Duke Battle Next
Saturday
By JAY Ll'CIAN
13 proved to be unlucky
In actuality for the Wildcats, leaders of the 13 teams In the Southeastern conference, as they lost a
7 to 0 decision, Saturday afternoon
to the Washington and Lee Generals in the 13th football contest between the two schools.
A much lighter team, the Generals rushed the sluggish, lacking
luster Wildcats from the beirinninrr
of the fray and played at top speed
throughout the contest, scoring one
touchdown and successfully reDuls- ing the attempts of the Kentuckian
when they did come to life.
Kentucky was woefully consDicu- otis by its lack of coordinate play
and blocking. . Perhaps it was the
effect of three hard games in a
row. ror they appeared to be an
entirely different team from the one
that took the field and wrested vic
tory from the powerful team of
Georgia Tech two weeks ago.
Although the Wildcats gained
more first downs, the game was
fairly even throughout, except In
the third quarter when the Gener
als, led by Seaton and Sawyer,
arove 84 yards for a touchdown.
They almost scored again In the
second hair when an attempted
field goal failed by inches.
The
successful touchdown play was a
shovel pass from Seaton to Sawyer
who carried it around end.
The fighting Washington and Lee
team was held for downs several
times close to the Big Blue goal
line.
Kercheval (attain wtes out
standing for his punting and defen
play. Kentucky's most consissive
tent ground gainer was Pritcliard
who carried the ball nine times for
an average of five yards on each
run. Rupert. Janes, and Jobe looked good in the line.
Over - confidence evidently was
one of the causes that brought
about the Kentucky defeat. Last
year's game with Washington and,
Lee was the fourth straight victory
for Kentucky and ended to the tune
of 54 to 7. This year's Generals
are a vastly improved team. They
tied the powerful West Virginia
team and were beaten by Yale by
only two touchdowns, one of which
came as the result of a blocked
punt.
The first defeat of the season for
the 'Cats will place them in a fighting mood for the Duke game next
Saturday and a complete reversal
of form is expected to take place.
The lineups and summaries:
Kentucky
W. A L.
Poa
Kreuter
LE
Henthorne
Dyer
Fish
LT
Jobe
Bolen
LG
C
Glynn
Janes
Aldridge
RG
Gumm
Carmen
Tichenor
RT
Ruppert
Wise
RE
QB
Seaton
Jean
Mattox
LH
Pritchard
Sawyer
Cassady
RH
Bailey
FB
Kercheval
Substitutions: Kentucky Jackson,
Wagner, Davidson, Kelly, Darnaby,
Jacobs, Kreuter, Long, Shanklin,
(Continued on Page Four)
Number

One of the highest honors ever
to be given a graduate of the University was. the awarding of the 1932
Deans Blanding and Holmes
Nobel prize for medicine to Dr.
Will Attend Women's ConThomas Hunt Morgan, internationvention to Be Held in
ally known zoologist of Pasadena,
Louisville
California. The award was made in
recognition of his discoveries conDean Sarah Blanding, and Mrs.
cerning the eugenic functions of
B. Holmes, assistant dean of
Sarah
chromosomes.
women at the University, will leave
Born In a house on the northSunday to attend the annual meet
west corner of Mill and Second
ing of the association of deans of
streets in Lexington, known as the
women in Kentucky which will be
Gen. John Hunt Morgan home, in
held in Louisville October 29 and 30.
1866, Doctor Morgan attended the
Mrs. Holmes is chairman of the
University, and was graduated in
program committee.
the class of 1886. He returned in
Miss Hilda Threlkeld, dean of
1890 to receive an honorary doctor's
women at the University of Louisdegree.
ville and former dean of women at
Announcement of the award came
is
college, Lexington,
Hamilton
on the eve of the commemoration
president of the association.
of the 100th anniversary of the
The program committee has ob
birth of Airred Nobel, Inventor of
tained several prominent persons in
dynamite, and originator of the
the fields of sociology, psychology,
prize. No exact cash value of the
and education to speak on various
prize has yet been released, but it
topics. Among the subjects to be
is expected to be at least $46,350,
discussed will be: "Meeting the
the value of the prize in 1930.
Needs of the Individual Girl,"
After leaving the University in
Meeting
Her Physical Needs,"
1886. Doctor Morgan began a long
Needs,"
'Meeting Her Character
teaching career at Bryn Mawr and
Meeting Her Needs As a Home- Columbia university, which termin"Meeting Her Vocational
maker."
ated when he became director of
Needs," and "Meeting Her Cultural
the William C. Kerchoff laboratorNeeds."
ies of biological sciences at the CalDr. Raymond R, Kent, president
ifornia Institute of Technology in
of the University of Louisville, will Cincinnati Symphony Orches1928.
He received his masters and
deliver the Introductory address. His
tra Will Present Two Pro- doctors degrees from Johns Hopkins
topic will be "What's New on the
university.
grams at Woodland AudiEducational Horizon." Other speakDoctor Morgan has established a
torium, November 16
ers on the program will be: Dr.
reputation which extends over two
Carnegie Foun
Anna L. Rose of the
continents. Some of his special reThe Cincinnati Symphony orchesdation for Advancement of Teach
searches have been upon chromoing: Dr. Alice Pickett. Louisville tra will make its appearance in somes and genes, during which exphvsician, and Dr. Homer Carpen- central Kentucky for the first time periments he has come close to the
ter. Dastor of the First Christian in 11 years when it presents two secret of life itself. A few of his
church. Numerous other topics will concerts Thursday, November 16. at
(Continued on Page Four)
be treated by various members of the Woodland auditorium, with Euthe departments of the different gene Goossens conducting.
Two programs will be offered. A
schools represented in the association. Dean Sarah G. Blanding will matinee at 2:30 p. m., which is
1933 termed a children's matinee, and
report on the activities of the
national association of deans con- lasting an hour and 15 minutes, will
feature numbers that are of special
gress.
Interest to students and children,
Children and Activities
as well as adults.
for This Week
DR. ROSE TO SPEAK
students may purchase reserved
Will Include Several StuStudents, In
Anna Rose, former dean of seats for 25 cents.
Dr.
dent Assemblies for Orwomen at George Washington uni- order to obtain tickets, must make
ganized Discussion
versity, Washington, D. C, will be their reservations early.
The evening concert will begin
the first of several
eveY. W. C. A. activities
for the
speakers for the vocational guid at 8:15 p. m. Prices for the
ance groups, the first meeting to ning are $2.50, J3. $1.50, and $1. with week include the World Fellowship
774 seats at thrVtter price. Tickets group and the Social Service group
be held in November.
Doctor Rose, who has been work- may now be procured from Miss meetings Wednesday afternoon, and
ing with the Carnegie Endowment Anna Chandler Goff, Lexington Freshman group meetings Wednesfund, is interested in the advance- College of Music, Phone Ashland day afternoon and Thursday night.
graduMiss Hilda Capablanca,
She will arrive 639.
ment of teaching.
ate student from Havana, Cuba,
in Lexington early in November and
Temple University, Philadelphia, will address the World Fellowship
will be available for personal InterA general convocation for sets the unique record of having group at 3 p. m. Wednesday in the
views.
women will also be held during her eight sets of twins among the stu- Women's building. She will discuss
dent bod- ystay on the campus.
the present political situation in
Cuba with special emphasis on the
part that students are taking in
The World Felthe government.
lowship group, under the direction
of Mary Caroline Terrell, meets biweekly to study International student problems. The next problem
to be studied Is the question of
Jewish persecution in Germany. All
By DOROTHY NICHOLS
women students interested are inmeetings
An interesting display of James Orson Lowell's Illustrations in pho- vited to attend the
"Why the Depression" will be the
Lane Allen material Is on exhibit togravure. One of these is of John
by Dr. Esat the University of Kentucky li- Gray, the schoolmaster, in his fa- subject of aof talk given
the political science
brary in connection with the recent mous fltjht with a wildcat in the ther Cole,
department, Wednesday at 4 p. m.
dedication of the James Lane Allen school house.
John Wilson Townsend's biogra- in the Women's building before the
memorial fountain In Lexington.
oi ine ooemi oervite
his bibliography
of Allen
The exhibit is on the second floor phy the edition and 1928 will be ex- members Dr. Cole will give a backgroup.
of
library and Is one of a num- in
of the
Photographs will be shown ground for the study of social welber of displays which will be shown hibited.
King Solomon, a character in fare Institutions which are attempt,
In the various cases during the of of Allen's books, and of the ing to meet the Increased demand
year. It includes nvenrsi eaiuons one
marking
King
Solomon's for welfare work due to unemploystone
of the Kentuckian's work. These grave in the Lexington
cemetery. ment, which the group is making.
are as follows:
The first freshman group meeting
These were lent by James R. Miner,
"Blue Grass Region of Kentucky," U. K. 'student.
An autographed which will be held at 4 p. m. Wedwith original Kemble Illustrations; picture of James Lane Allen was nesday in the Women's building
"The Choir Invisible;" "The Land- lent by Prof. Grant C. Knight.
will be concerned with the second
mark," Mr. Allen's last work; "The
"The Reign of Law," a first edi- of a series of talks by Miss Gertrude
lent by tion with autographed letter from Wade of the Home Economics deBride of the Mistletoe,"
Mrs. W. T. Lafferty, and "The Ken- James Lane Allen to Mrs. Madison partment on "How to be More
lent by Prof. Caweln, was lent by Professor Charming " The subject for distucky Cardinal."
Knight.
cussion Wednesday will be "How to
Grant C. Knight.
Five pictures of Mr. Allen, one Dress to Suit your Type Most EcoA copy of the rare "John Gray,"
published in Llppincott'a monthly taken in early life, one from Har nomically."
Thursday at 7:15 p. m. in Pattermagazine in 1892. the early form per's Weekly In 1895, and an auto-o- f
Roberts
'The Choir Invisible" will graphed photograph taken Just e son hall Augusta freshman will lead
girls on
on exhibit. There will also be a fore his death, also were lent by a discussion for
Conversation."
copy of "The Choir Invisible" with Professor Knight.

Noted Author's Writings
Are Exhibited in Library

WIN OVER 'CATS

DRIVE FOR ONLY SCORE

Student Governing Body Will
Conduct Other Class

two specials. Music will be furnished by Andy Anderson and his
Nighthawks, an 11 piece orchestra.
This dance is held each year for
the purpose of raising funds for the
publication
of the Kentuckian.
which Is entirely a student project.
Other sources from which financial
support for the yearbook Is derived
are senior dues, advertising solicited by members of the business staff,
and subscriptions obtained by the
sales staff. Each year, an award Is
presented to the student selling the
most yearbooks, and usually a free
book is given for every ten sold by
any member of the sales staff.
Chaperones for the dance will be:
Pres. and Mrs. Frank L. McVey,
Prof, and Mrs. Enoch Grehan, Prof.
and Mrs. Victor R. Portmann, Dean
and Mrs. T. T. Jones, Mr. and Mrs.
Lysle Croft, Mrs. P. K. Holmes, and
Mrs. Annie Neel.

W. & L. GENERALS

BY

Ann Jones, William Nicholls,
And Eugene Cowley Are
Other Officers

Annual Event Will Be Held
In Gym Saturday; Music
By

CONCERTS
I

19.1.1

SENIORS CHOOSE

Plans Released
Band

SZ?

KENTUCKY

LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 21,

VOLUME XXIV

A university

Best Copy Available

PHI BETA NAMES
SEVEN PLEDGES
Music and Dramatic Group
Chooses Five Undergraduates and Two Associate
Members
i

Phi Beta, national music and
dramatic honorary organization for

women, pledged Eleanor Wilkerson,
Eva May Nunnelley, Frances Kerr,
Anne Goodykuntz. and Betty Mof-fet- t,
undergraduates, and Mrs. H. C.
Robinson and Miss Jane Ratchford,
as associate members, at services
held at 3:30 p. m Monday, in the
Phi Beta room of the Women's
building.
Mrs. Robinson is a member of
the Cullis Robinson piano duo
which broadcasts from the WHAS
extension studio, and is a past president of the MacDowell club. She
played a leading part in the opera
' Maltha" which was presented by
the MacDowell club last spring. She
plays the piano and is well known
for her vocal ability.
Miss Jane Ratchford is a teacher
of

dramatics at Transylvania

uni-

versity and works with the Transylvania glee club. She Is a member
of the Central Christian church
choir. She has taken part in several Gulgnol plays and will be remembered particularly for her work
In "Once in a Lifetime," presented
last spring.
The undergraduate pledges and
the type of music in which they
are particularly interested are Eleanor Wilkerson, trombone, band,
and piano; Eva Mae Nunnelley,
violin, orchestra, vocal, glee club;
Frances Kerr, piano; Anne Goody-koont- a,
piano, glee club; Betty
MofTett, piano.
Pledges to Phi Beta must have a
standing of 15 and must have either musical or dramatic ability.

* Best Copy
THE

rage Two

these admissions and facts, are the
actions of the Hitler government,
since its inception. Justified?
To that question It Is hard to
answer "yes." The acts of Hitler
In the pmt several months can
hardly be Justified on any grounds.
His persecution of the Jews has
been unreasonable, unfair, and even
murderous to a great race. The
stopping of all public opinion
through complete censorship and
control of the press and radio is
not desirable to say the least. It
has been found in the past that
men who are sincere In their deal
ings with the people do not at
tempt to muzzle the press and choke
other means of public expression
But as has been said the very con
ditions that have been described are
A SIGNAL HONOR
due in a large part to the unjust
For the first time In the history , treatment received by Oermany at
of the institution, a Nobel prize the hands of the lormer Allied
award has been presented to a Powers.
Dr. I Much talk has been heard lately
graduate of the University.
Thomas Hunt Morgan, a native of In reference to the Oerman situa- Lexington, and who was graduated tion, about the failure of the
from the University In 1888. has League of Nations. It Is well to
received this great scientific honor. Keep in mina inai uermany can
Doctor Morgan was awarded the not withdraw from the League for
Nobel prize for research in the field two years. It Is well also to remem
of medicine.
I ber
that nineteen years ago last
After his graduation from the August, in 1914. Germany did not
University. Doctor Morgan received give the world any notice of Its
his M. S. and Ph. D. degrees from position or Intentions, but simply
the Johns Hopkins University. He mfyrched her forces Into foreign
has also been given honorary de- territory. The present situation, all
grees from McOlll, California, Edin- will agree, is certainly something of
burgh, Michigan and the University an Improvement over what existed
of Kentucky.
on 1914. At least we now attempt
"Doctor Morgan's dscoveries In to stop war and, however feeble our
the field of heredity constitute the efforts may be, they do help.
greatest of the discoveries made i This generation has laid a founthis century in biology," according dation upon which permanent
to Prof. W. S. Anderson, professor peace will be the result.
of genetics at the University of
Kentucky.
Dr. Prank L. McVey, president of
PITKIN CLUB
the University, Saturday telegraphThe Pitkin club was organized at
ed congratulations to Doctor Morgan, who now resides in Pasadena. the University of Kentucky in 1925
by certain members of the Maxwell
California.
He said, "The University of Kentucky extends congratu- Street Presbyterian church who saw
lations to Its distinguished alumnus an opportunity for doing some conupon whom has been conferred a structive work of a religious nature
most signal honor, the Nobel prize. among the Presbyterian men and
The University is honored by your women as well as the young people
great services as a scientist, phil- of other denominations who atosopher and gentleman.
May you tended the University.
The idea of having a Pitkin club
The
have many happy years."
Alumni association also wired a on this campus came through Doccongratulatory message to the dis- tor States, professor of Physics at
the University, and a member of
tinguished graduate.
In addition to his outstanding Maxwell street church. Doctor
work In the field of science. Doctor States was a member of the first
Morgan is a direct descendant of Pitkin club which was organized on
one of the South's oldest and most the campus of the University of
colorful families. His father. Cap- Pittsburgh. The original name of
tain Charlton Morgan, was a broth- the club is fn honor of Horace
er of the Confederate cavalry leader, Tracy Pitkin, missionary to China,
Oen. John Hunt Morgan, and serv- who was killed In the Boxer Reed with him during the War Be- bellion. The first club had as its
tween the States. His mother, Mrs. purpose missionary work.
Doctor States, Prof. J. Morton
Ellen Key Howard Morgan, was a
of Francis Scott Davis, Prof. W.'s. Webb with the
Key, who wrote the "Star Spangled cooperation of George Kavanaugh,
secretary of the Y.M.C.A., organized
Banner."
Every graduate and student of the University of Kentucky Pitkin
the University should feel proud of club l